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My first attempt at landscape astrophotography

Discussion in 'Astrophotography' started by jdthebigj, Jun 6, 2016.

  1. jdthebigj

    jdthebigj Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Aug 28, 2012
    Fremont, CA
    JD
    Fellow Asrotrippers,

    This is my first post on this forum but I've been lurking around the shadows collecting tips from the wise individuals who have shared their experiences. I was in the monument valley last month and thought of using my knowledge.

    Olympus OMD-EM5 MK-II v2.2 + Olympus 7-14mm on iOptron Skytracker v2
    10 each, light frames and dark frames : 40 sec ISO 1600 F2.8 12mm
    10 bias frames: 1/16000sec ISO 1600 F2.8 12mm
    Separate exposure for foreground illumination

    Combined using DeepSkyStacker. Post processed in Adobe Photoshop Elements 11 and Lightroom 5.

    The result was following image:
    Milky way over the two mittons by Jaideep Padhye, on Flickr

    As my first attempt, I'm pretty happy but only big disappointment has been the greenish tinge on the picture. Unfortunately i was not able to get rid of it.

    C & C welcome.

    Special call out to siftu for his wonderful article which made everything look less intimidating.


    - JD

    Helpful References for beginners in astrophotography:
    The theory or How to create better images
    Night Photography Image Processing, Clarkvision.com
    Reflections: Running DeepSkyStacker for Windows on the Mac
    Astrophotography Nightscape Lens Rating
    Milky Way Exposure Calculator
    Landscape Astrophotography with m43 - The shoot and Post Process (Image Heavy)
    Olympus mZD 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO lens makes for a great astroscape lens for Milky Way photos | Gary Ayton photography
     
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  2. siftu

    siftu Mu-43 Top Veteran

    633
    Mar 26, 2015
    Bay Area, CA
    siftu
    Well done it's a great pic and glad you got some info out of that. The green should be easy to remove with the tint slider or a tone curve on the green channel.
     
  3. jdthebigj

    jdthebigj Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Aug 28, 2012
    Fremont, CA
    JD
    I tired it pretty hard. If the green goes, then ugly blue comes onto the stars. I was decently happy so I let it be but looking for ways to circumvent this issue.
     
  4. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    If you move the green you usually need to move the red and blue too to balance it. You may even let the green as is and boost the other to channels to get a gray tone. I used the LAB curves but any channel mixer/curves should do it. Here is what I got (four shots on flickr):

    27420442012_0dcb6ebe94_c.

    First one is with green cast removed only (following this), second one is with more contrast, third one I desaturated the blue tones a little, last one is a quick personal edit with a little more light and red in the landscape (with a very rough mask): the peak on the right is a little too bright but I like the details in the foreground.

    27242746590_fa4cc0aa70_c.

    Nice shot BTW.
     
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  5. jdthebigj

    jdthebigj Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Aug 28, 2012
    Fremont, CA
    JD
    Thanks guys for your help
     
  6. jdthebigj

    jdthebigj Mu-43 Regular

    29
    Aug 28, 2012
    Fremont, CA
    JD
    I prefer the first edit more. It looks more natural
     
  7. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    I really feel that a night sky should be black and not grey, so IMO the more "natural" shot is probably the third one.

    About the land yes, it is a little HDR-ish, so the sky from the third and the land from the first (with just a little shadow recovery on the terrain) may be a good compromise. But of course it is personal taste.
     
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  8. Tenpenny

    Tenpenny Mu-43 Regular

    172
    Mar 16, 2015
    Nampa, Idaho
    Brent Watkins
    I've been trying to learn a little bit about night/astro landscapes as well. For me, they are proving to be a real b**ch to figure out. I think I am beginning to realize that in order for the astro shots with lit foregrounds to somewhat resemble what I'm seeing in the landscape, and to convey the way I think I see it, I'm needing to process each photo twice. Once for the sky/stars and once for the foreground. Then mask accordingly. I'm still not there yet, but it's sure fun going out to learn it.
     
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  9. acnomad

    acnomad Mu-43 Veteran

    284
    Jan 5, 2016
    Andy
    On a recent trip to Yosemite, I hastily grabbed this shot with a P7-14 on E-M1:

    El Capitan
    Yosemite-6090498.
    The settings were: 7mm, f/4, 30 sec., ISO 1600
    Postprocessing included some dodging of the moon, sharpening, noise reduction and white balance to get the blue cast. The two bright lights in the terrain below the Big Dipper are rock climbers on El Capitan; everything else is a star (or the setting moon).

    Looking for suggestions on how to improve this kind of shot without going over-the-top with specialized equipment and software.
     
    Last edited: Jun 13, 2016
  10. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    It seems a bit out of focus (the stars look like big discs). The features of interest are also extremely underexposed. what were you trying to capture here?
     
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  11. acnomad

    acnomad Mu-43 Veteran

    284
    Jan 5, 2016
    Andy
    Yes, it's all a bit out of focus. The stars looked OK in the viewfinder, and although I couldn't see the terrain very well, I figured it would be in focus as well with such a short focal length. My intent was to capture the distinctive silhouette of the rock formation against a moonlit night sky. I wanted pinpoints, not trails or saucers for the stars, so I was willing to lose foreground detail.