Multiple Bodies, Multiple Needs - Multiple Flashes?

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by Replytoken, Jan 24, 2013.

  1. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    When I initially purchased my m4/3rd's gear, it was supposed to be a compact, lightweight alternative to my D300 and lenses. While it has met those goals, one body became three, and I now have a host of lenses as well. My D300 is still in use for a variety of situations, but I am finding myself comfortable with m4/3rd's. So much so that I have now been looking at flashes to see if I can use my gear where I might have used my D300 with SB-600 flash.

    But, it seems that I have radically different expectations for compatible flash gear, and and trying to sort things out. On the one hand, the beauty of this system is that it is very lightweight and comapct, and it would be great to have a flash that is also lightweight and compact. On the other, I want a flash that is powerful enough to duplicate what I often do with my D300/SB-600 combo. There are flashes that are this powerful (both in output and in recycle time), but they are not small, and most can dwarf almsot any m4/3rd's body with the possible exception of a GH3. So, I have been considering a two flash solution, but my wallet does not seem happy with the idea.

    I am presently using a G3, and E-PL2 w/VF-2 viewfinder, and a GF3. I would expect that an OM-D will probably join this stable some time this year. The flashes that I am considering are the OLy FL-600R for power and compatibility and Metz' 28 CS-2 ( Metz mecablitz 28 CS-2 Digital Slave Flash MZ 52822D B&H Photo ) for compact travel (and as a compact slave). The combined cost is not cheap, but it seems like a versatile solution that might provide some utility in the long run.

    Any thoughts or suggestions?

    --Ken
     
  2. BarefootPilgrim

    BarefootPilgrim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    517
    Dec 23, 2009
    Westchester, IL
    Bob
    If it were me, I'd stick with your Nikon flashes and use them off-camera in manual mode with a set of inexpensive radio triggers.

    When you're using the flash off-camera, it seems to me that size shouldn't really be an issue. So what if the flash dwarfs your body? The RF triggers are only about 2 inches by 3/4 inch or so in size, and they're the only thing mounted on your camera.

    I have several Olympus cameras and three compatible flashes (Oly FL-50R, Oly FL36R and Metz 58-AF2). In spite of that fact that all three are capable of use in any mode my Olympus cameras offer (including TTL triggered by on-camera flash), I find them most flexible and convenient when used manually and triggered by a set of cheap Cactus RF triggers.

    I also find that using them off-camera gives me much greater flexibility in the kind of lighting I can put on my subject.

    Of course, the kind of light you use will depend on what you want to accomplish. You weren't very specific about that. Perhaps some additional detail would help us answer your question more effectively.
     
  3. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    Thank you for the reply, Bob. With regards to specifics, I can see two primary uses for flash. First, if I am working with flash(es)in a fixed position. In this case, I would agree with you that using existing flashes manually with remote triggers makes sense.

    My second use, though, would be "grip and grin" work when I am doing event-type work. In this case, I usually need a flash on camera or bracket. Holding a D300 steady with one hand is not really ideal. Yes, a m4/3rd's body is smaller, but controls on these bodies often seem to require two hands (and would possibly be a concern when using the Metz off camera). Granted, I could hand-hold a flash, but a bracket would be better, and on camera with a light modifier is also a possibility. That was why I referred to the size issue between the flashes and camera bodies.

    --Ken