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Movement in low light - fastest AF?

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by harry_s, Oct 6, 2016.

  1. harry_s

    harry_s Mu-43 Regular

    180
    Jul 19, 2011
    Wiltshire, UK
    I've been seriously considering trying M43 gear for weddings but I've been reading quite a bit of conflicting information.

    I'm after - ideally a fast 35 or 50 and 85mm (or thereabouts) equivalent on a body that will be reliable capturing moving subjects in low light. The new Olympus 25mm 1.2 and Panasonic 42.5mm 1.2 would be ideal.

    IBIS etc is largely irrelevant, I'm freezing action (albeit relatively slow action), so shutter speeds are never dropping below 1/160.

    I've read one detailed account that says a Panasonic GX7 is quite a bit quicker / more reliable in low light than an EM1, particuarly with the fast Olympus primes. I would be interested to know if this is a common conclusion.

    Full disclosure: I've just acquired an EM1 and 12-40mm 2.8. I understand this combo is very quick even in low light, but f2.8 is simply not going to be fast enough sometimes.

    Being a Nikon user I swear by Auto ISO with a minimum shutter speed of 1/160, as far as I can tell no Panasonic body (inexplicably) has these capabilities, but at a push I would go Manual (I assume at least they will do Auto ISO in Manual?)
     
  2. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Hi, many (most?) bodies will do auto ISO in manual, but only the Pen F gives EC in manual.

    Most Oly bodies have a Slow Limit setting that will set a preferred minimum shutter speed for A and P modes.

    My experience with my E-M1 is that some lenses are very fast and reliable at night (Oly 17/1.8), and some hunt and frequently fail to lock (Oly 45/1.8).

    The Pana 20mm is well known for slow focus, especially indoors.
     
  3. acnomad

    acnomad Mu-43 Veteran

    284
    Jan 5, 2016
    Andy
    If the E-M1ii is all that Oly says it will be, that could be your answer. FWIW, I think the E-M1 already has quite good AF capability, and feel confident that the second iteration of that model will be even better, but I doubt it will be as fast or accurate as Canikon.
     
  4. harry_s

    harry_s Mu-43 Regular

    180
    Jul 19, 2011
    Wiltshire, UK
    Thanks, I've read several comments in that respect about the 45mm 1.8. A shame as it's a great lens otherwise (and a bargain).
     
  5. Speedliner

    Speedliner Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 2, 2015
    Southern NJ, USA
    Rob
    I think you'd be happy with any of pl15, oly 17-1.8, pl25-1.4, oly 45-1.8 and oly 75-1.8 for much less money than the others you mentioned. Can you really shoot a wedding at 1.2 DOF?

    For zooms, the Oly 4/3 35-100,f2 would work as well as the 150,f2 prime if you ever need that much reach. They're expensive and heavy though.
     
  6. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    I've shot quite a few weddings with Olympus gear. I find the PRO zooms do quite a good job. During the ceremony, I have zero problems with AF on the EM1 or EM5 Mk II with the zooms or any of the primes that I have employed (17, 25,45,75 f/1.8 varieties.

    Where I will say that there has been issue is with backlit subjects at the receptions. On 2 occasions there were reception events that had my subjects in front of either a bright set of spotlights or backdropped by a projected slideshow. The AF of the m43 cameras failed to reliably lock. I needed to throw the MF clutch into action and focus that way.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  7. harry_s

    harry_s Mu-43 Regular

    180
    Jul 19, 2011
    Wiltshire, UK
    Quite comfortably I would imagine. I currently use D750s with a Sigma 35mm 1.4 and Nikon 85mm 1.4, often wide open and rarely beyond f2.8.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. astrostl

    astrostl Mu-43 Veteran

    360
    Oct 4, 2014
    St. Louis, MO
    Justin Honold
    Not to spark an equivalence debate (God help me), but this is a plus for MFT for me: f/1.2 in light (making up for a smaller sensor), f/2.4 in depth of field (no "tip of nose in focus" issues).

    I shoot various events at f/1.2-f/1.8, handheld with a Nissin i40 flash at most, all the time. Biggest go-tos are the Voigtlander 17.5/0.95, PanaLecia 42.5/1.2, and Olympus 75/1.8.
     
  9. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I also shoot a D750, I have a D800 as well. About two years ago I tried to make the switch to m4/3 for my event work. I had an E-M1, the 45, 75, and 35-100 f/2.8 plus the FL-600R. I'll add that this was before the major update to the E-M1 that improved the AF a good bit.

    The E-M1 was fine for formals, rehearsals, ceremonies, etc. But not even close for a dark dance floor with a lot of fast action, not the way I shoot anyway. I know many handle these situations. I think I could have adjusted my style and learned how to make it work for me. But I also had to consider if I was going to make a complete switch or just add to what I had and why? Add I have 2 FX Nikon bodies; 24mm-200mm f/2.8 and 16mm-200mm f/4; the flash system and battery life; and it handles everything I throw at it.

    In the end I reversed direction and scaled my m4/3 back to fun, family, and everything not professional event related. The E-M1 mkII and Fuji X-T2 may have have me looking again.
     
  10. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    Also to add...you have to remember the distances you are shooting at. Not sure how many here shoot weddings, but you are usually not any closer than 15 feet of anyone in the wedding party. I'm routinely told that I must be "in the back", "no closer than the last row of occupied seats". Even in a small church/venue that is still quite a distance away. 99% of the time, you are prohibited from using flash during the ceremony.

    Reception time is different as you are not under such restrictions, but even then if you look at the DOF charts for an m43 camera against f/1.8 and the distances you are shooting, you've got plenty of "sharp" focus area.

    These are the numbers from DOFMaster for the Oly 17/1.8:

    Subject distance 10 ft

    Depth of field
    Near limit 7.81 ft
    Far limit 13.9 ft
    Total 6.08 ft

    In front of subject 2.19 ft (36%)
    Behind subject 3.89 ft (64%)

    Hyperfocal distance 35.5 ft
    Circle of confusion 0.015 mm

    Here for the 75/1.8:
    Subject distance 15 ft

    Depth of field
    Near limit 14.7 ft
    Far limit 15.3 ft
    Total 0.64 ft

    In front of subject 0.31 ft (49%)
    Behind subject 0.33 ft (51%)

    Hyperfocal distance 690.7 ft
    Circle of confusion

    -------------------------------

    so your 25/45mm f/1.8 wuld be somewhere in between and if you shoot like me and use the zooms more often than not in these situations, wide open at f/2.8 - you've got even more latitude.
     
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I found m4/3 very good under these conditions.

    And here the problem. Especially when the distance changes from 5 to 25 feet and back again the next second.
     
  12. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    one person's problem is another persons asset.
     
  13. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I should have just left the "reception time is different" part of that quote. I just had to hard a time getting in focus images. And since my Nikon gear pretty much just works the way I need it to....

    But again this is for me and the way I work. I'm sure that for others they work just fine.

    I'll add the OP noted Auto ISO. Auto ISO in manual mode with exposure compensation. :2thumbs: