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Mount help- Vivitar Series 1 70-210mm

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by hanklepstein, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. hanklepstein

    hanklepstein New to Mu-43

    9
    Dec 3, 2011
    Hi! This is actually my first post here.. but I've been reading this forum for awhile now

    I just bought this lens on ebay- they said it was a Minolta SR mount. I bought the only Minolta adapter I could find (MD to m4/3) and it isn't working for me. I'm not sure if I need a different adapter or if there is a certain way to mount the lens that is messing me up.

    seems like the pics are having issues showing up on here so I linked them too:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    pic 1
    pic 2

    Thanks for the help
     
  2. harrysue

    harrysue Mu-43 Regular

    164
    Mar 12, 2011
    Never used a Nikon, so I cannot say for sure, but that metal clip on the outside barrel of the lens is what I recall seeing on some older Nikon lenses.
     
  3. WJW59

    WJW59 Mu-43 Veteran

    235
    Feb 20, 2011
    I'm not a Nikon user either but it certainly looks like a Nikon AI to me. Vivitar was usually pretty good about making their lenses. The marking are normally on the mount or somewhere on the lens barrel near the mount. Samples would include P-K/A or PK/A for Pentax "A" lenses or K-AR for Konica AutoReflex so look for the markings N-AI.
     
  4. hanklepstein

    hanklepstein New to Mu-43

    9
    Dec 3, 2011
    Ahhhhhh thanks for the help guys. The one adapter that I own that I didn't try is my Nikon adapter. But it's for Nikon G lenses with aperture control.

    It seems to work except it locks the aperture when on. I'm curious, should the lens focus correctly when using this adapter?
     
  5. ekoe

    ekoe Mu-43 Regular

    73
    Sep 26, 2010
    Unless you're terribly lucky, an adapted zoom lens will not hold focus through the zoom due to slight inaccuracy of the adapter. Even a few thousandths of a mm are enough to cause a parfocal lens to lose focus through the zoom. In fact, even our m4/3 kit zooms are not perfectly parfocal and would lose focus through the zoom if not for the aid of firmware. This has been a point of contention, but I do know what I'm talking about... I service, collimate adapt legacy zooms (among others) for modern digital cameras.
     
  6. hanklepstein

    hanklepstein New to Mu-43

    9
    Dec 3, 2011
    That makes sense.

    I plan on getting another Nikon adapter. I have the Nikon G adapter with aperture control. The one without aperture control is for Nikon F lenses I think...?

    I'm just curious to know if both of these Nikon adapters are the same length (only difference being the aperture control).

    It doesn't really matter because I plan on getting the Rokinon 85mm so I need the other Nikon adapter anyways. I guess I can test and find out myself!

    The thing that worries me about this lens is it's so heavy, it looks like it might break this adapter. It's a cheap Fotodiox adapter which I've been using with a Tamron 28-75. The lens will wiggle around a little bit, which I don't like. But it's worked for me.
     
  7. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    "F" is the name for Nikon's mount. "G" is a series of lenses that are made cheaper by not putting an aperture ring on the body. It is a bit of contention for us old Nikon shooters. Anyway if you get a mount without the "G" adjuster it should work fine. Your lens would be what is called "AI"{for more info on that click link below}.

    KEH Camera Blog: Nikon Lenses: Non-AI, AI, AI-S, and AI'd
     
  8. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Or for shooters of any system who still makes cameras these days, except maybe Leica shooters. ;) Nobody makes aperture rings anymore, and that is a point of contention with me. Hell, they're even getting rid of manual focus rings now! The Panasonic X compact lens uses a lever for manual focus and zoom, and the Nikkor 1 lens has no manual focus whatsoever. What is becoming of cameras?
     
  9. ekoe

    ekoe Mu-43 Regular

    73
    Sep 26, 2010
    I agree entirely, Ned. That is precisely why I haunt these adapted lens forums... because a 'lens' should have an aperture ring, manual focus, an infinity stop and accurate focus marks. Slow, debilitated kit lenses are simply not for me. I'm frustrated with anything other than a fast, manual focus lens. The zoom action on the kit lenses is also stiff, which makes it very hard to perform a smooth zoom when shooting video. I often perform complete overhauls on old zooms specifically to obtain smooth zoom action... the way they were designed to perform. Why do the kit lenses arrive new with stiff zoom action, as if they made no effort in this regard?
     
  10. snkenai

    snkenai Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Sep 5, 2010
    Using those BIG vivitar lenses on the SMALL m4/3 cameras does bring the need to be careful about the strength of mount, mostly the camera itself, as it is not designed to be used with such heavy lenses. I do not mount them on a tripod! The bottom of the camera is not strong enough to stand the pressure. I know from experience!

    That being said, I heartily recommend using the Series 1 70-210mm on m4/3. I hand hold, propped against/on something steady, so that I can stop all movement. I use the 2 second self-timer to fire the camera. Works great and faster than you may think, after some practice. The manual assist really helps get the focus right.

    Enjoy,
     
  11. ekoe

    ekoe Mu-43 Regular

    73
    Sep 26, 2010
    That's a very valid reminder, Steve. Especially since some of the best (and fastest) legacy zooms for m4/3 also happen to be very large and heavy (similar to the Vivitar Series 1 70-210). I like the f1.5 to f2.5 zooms in the range of about 20-100mm.

    What I find with heavy zooms is that the left hand naturally assumes support of the lens, until there is a need to adjust focus, aperture or zoom. I agree with your policy of not placing strain on the camera mount by using a tripod with heavy zoom, unless you support the lens as well. Ideally, with lenses of this size and heft, support rods should be used to protect the camera mount, but I realize this isn't the sort of kit we all aspire toward.

    With the Kiron 'one-touch' (push/pull zoom) version of the Vivitar Series 1 70-210 (which I think hanklepstein has), this is less of an issue because the left hand is able to continually support the lens during zoom and focus operations. But the one-touch zoom collar often becomes stiff and many require overhaul to work smoothly.

    To attempt to answer Hank's question... yes, I think the adapters for G-series Nikon lenses are the same length (flange focal distance) as F-series (AI, AI-S). Someone please correct me though, because I'm not very familiar with Nikon G's.

    I have the Pixco Nikon-m4/3 adapter, and I've used it with my 'one-touch' 70-210. It does have some wiggle on the rotational axis, due to the looseness of the camera mount locking pin, but otherwise there is little to no play in the mount. The adapter does require adjustment in order for the zoom to hold focus, but if you like I can advise you how to do this. For what it's worth, the knurling on the Pixco matches the knurling on the Vivitar's aperture ring almost exactly.
     
  12. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I was wondering about the focus on the smaller X lens. I like the idea of the zoom lever for some shooting but focus should be a ring! The new Nikon 1 cameras will do manual focus but you have to use a dial or button. I had a coolpix 5700 that I had to do that on - :mad: - not having manual focus ring was the biggest reason I got rid of it!

    What is becoming of cameras = high-tech! AF is so good and fast that only the few adventurous photographers{like us} ever venture out to the days of old. I started on a Nikormat and the only thing auto in it was a built in light meter that was not always accurate and when the battery got low it stopped working all together. Can anybody say hand meter?
     
  13. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Yes they are the same. The G will mount onto older bodies but they are all but useless. They work great on newer cameras however , just annoying not having aperture control on the lens{it can be set through the dial control on the body however}. AI and AIs lenses will fit every body Nikon ever made but on the newer entry level bodies they are very hard to use. The new entry level bodies do not have the aperture coupling so the metering will not work. Works fine if you hand meter or just guess. Lenses made before the AI standard{1977 or earlier} will not fit the new higher end bodies but can be modified to AI and then will work. They will fit the entry level bodies but have the same issue that the AI and AIs lenses do.
     
  14. hanklepstein

    hanklepstein New to Mu-43

    9
    Dec 3, 2011
    Thanks for the help guys. I should be getting my new adapter in the mail this week. I haven't seriously tested out this lens, just tried it out and it seems to work fine. Macro mode works nicely. I really do like the feel of the lens, and it doesn't seem to have been used at all- just a little dusty when I got it.

    I'm with you guys on the aperture ring business... Especially for video (which I do about 75% of the time compared to photo) I realllly prefer having an aperture ring and a smooth zoom. I just got a 14-42 kit lens with my 3rd GH2 and I don't know how people can use that lens. It's more like a 14, somewhere in between, and a 42.. The 14-140 on the other hand is pretty nice.

    I also have the Rokinon 85mm (Nikon) and Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye on the way. It's nice to know they are still making some full manual lenses. But hey- at least all these current electronic lenses will probably go for really cheap in the used market in 15 years because they won't be able to work on any of the new cameras! hmm

    Now I just need to find a cheap lens to go with this lonely Minolta adapter....
     
  15. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Most pro video cameras do not have aperture rings on the lens and some don't have zoom rings either. The zoom is almost always a pressure sensitive rocker and the aperture is adjusted via a dial or button on the body. Although some have both but the ring has no stops or markings. Focus rings often work the same way , no stops or markings.

    Movie production cameras on the other hand are very manual. The focus , aperture and zoom are all controlled on the lens manually. The focus is almost always attached to a follow focus device and the zoom often has a lever that screws onto the ring.

    It is only recently that video cameras have become more cinema-like. This is because of the huge indie trend. People want to make movies not just shoot video and they want to do it like the pros. So the camera makers are now building their equipment for us who want that.
     
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  16. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    I notice you say for "us" who want that. Hear, hear! :tongue:
     
  17. ekoe

    ekoe Mu-43 Regular

    73
    Sep 26, 2010
    That's not entirely correct. There are 'professional' camcorders, and then there are broadcast video production cameras. In these classifications, broadcast video cameras are higher grade, larger sensor, better signal, overall more pro than 'professional' camcorders. Broadcast EFP and ENG video cameras have an interchangeable lens bayonet mount, and use high quality Fujinon and Canon TV broadcast lenses with aperture rings, zoom and focus marks with infinity stop, just like manual cine lenses, and oftentimes with built-in, switchable ND filtration and in some cases a 2x extender and macro modes. These broadcast lenses often have servo zoom and motorized aperture modes, as well as manual control. Broadcast cameras precede our more recent 'professional' camcorders like the PD150/170, XL-1/2, and VX1000/2000 series, Z1, etc. So, it is not only recently that video cameras have become more cinema-like in regard to aperture and focus marks on lenses. EFP and ENG broadcast cameras have all had these features since the early advent of video production.
     
  18. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    You are right , most of the highest end lenses do have those features. I was talking about the "pro-sumer" level and either spell-check deleted "-sumer" or I didn't finish typing{I sometimes get ahead of myself when typing - duh!}.
     
  19. ekoe

    ekoe Mu-43 Regular

    73
    Sep 26, 2010
    No worries, I just had to clarify for those reading who may not be aware of broadcast video lenses.
     
  20. hanklepstein

    hanklepstein New to Mu-43

    9
    Dec 3, 2011
    So, I received my Nikon F adapter and the Nikon mount Rokinon 85mm

    Annnnd I'm pretty frustrated by it all. I've mainly stuck to the M42 mount because I haven't had any issues with them. They screw on nice and snug and work nicely.

    But I put the Rokinon on the new adapter- photos and video look great, but it's not very snug. Even more than the Tamron 28-75 it jiggles around. Maybe it's because the focus is much slower and you have to put more force into it, forcing the lens just to move a bit. It's really frustrating but I'm thinking there might be a way to fill the tinyyy gap between the lens and the adapter...

    Then I decided to put the old Vivitar on next. Still though, like when i used the Nikon G adapter, the aperture ring won't move. It moves fine without the adapter. Also, after taking it off once before with a lot of effort, I put the adapter back on and I can't get it off! I'm not sure why it's so difficult. It's not a huge deal though because the Rokinon 85 works with the other adapter (still jiggles slightly though).

    By the way, both of these adapters are Fotodiox. If anyone has any tips to fix the issue with the jiggling or why the aperture is stuck on the Vivitar any help would be great.

    I planned on getting some Nikon adapters for my 7d as well but hopefully they aren't this bad.