Most tourists take photos from the same spot

Discussion in 'Scenic, Architecture, and Travel' started by s0nus, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. s0nus

    s0nus Mu-43 Veteran

    Dec 13, 2010
    I stumbled across this blog post about Switzerland-based Corinne Vionnet who has taken several hundred photos of the world's top tourist destinations and layered them. The results are really interesting - check them out here: Hundreds of Tourist Photos Weaved into One

    I'm reminded of the other discussion going on about why we take pictures, and I would argue it has to do with memory - of remembering or being remembered.

    For the sake of remembering, I often seek out the "classic" framing of a given place so I can have the satisfaction of saying that "I too went there and took that picture". In away, it's nice to know that I'm participating in some kind of tradition when taking a picture that thousands have done before. It says something about a particular vantage point that thousands have sought out and shot from in the past - that spot may best serve the subject in some way. Democratic photography - hah!

    On the other hand, this also serves as a reminder that to be memorable , my images must have character, personality, and uniqueness. Otherwise, they're just 1 in a sea of thousands, and easily replaceable in a project such as Vionnet's. For an image to be remembered by others, it should stand out and treat the subject somehow uniquely.

    I enjoy both approaches. What about you?
  2. Hyubie

    Hyubie Unique like everyone else

    Oct 15, 2010
    Real Name:
    I also think it is important to note that in some other tourist-y spots, people are only allowed in a very specific area, so you have no choice but to have the same view/picture as everyone else. Some of these are the US Capitol (all the times I went there, there was a barrier in front), the White House, and I think also the Pyramids?

    Otherwise, I think it's also because the angle of the usual photographs are really the best angles. For example, the Colosseum in Rome - we want to see both the "complete" side and the "broken" side; or we want to capture the complete picture, thus Taj Mahal or the entrance to the Forbidden City at almost always the same spot. During these times, I think to h%ll with photography rules and all these "look at it from another angle" stuff, I just want to see me with this view! :)
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  3. red

    red Mu-43 Veteran

    Sep 21, 2010
    A exciting work by Corinne Vionnet!

    Look at my short collection about my Portuguese holiday pictures... that's my approach (in this thread)
  4. Luckypenguin

    Luckypenguin .

    Oct 9, 2010
    Brisbane, Australia
    Real Name:
    As of last year you were still relatively free to walk around the site of the Giza Pyramids. There are thankfully barriers to stop you climbing on them but not so much to herd you away from them. I'm not talking chainwire fence here either so they're not a great impediment for photographs. What you will find is that a number of the security guards pick out a spot where you can get a good photo and secretively point you to it as though they are making an exception by allowing you into a restricted area - all for a bit of baksheesh of course.
  5. Alanroseman

    Alanroseman Super Moderator Emeritus

    Dec 21, 2010
    New England
    Nice Post. Enjoyable.
  6. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    I try and search out unique/different views, but sometimes, the classic shots are taken there for a reason - it's the best view.

    I am off to the Taj Mahal in a few days, so we shall see!