Mirrorless cameras are slower firing than DSLRs.

Mack

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Never expected that a mirrorless camera's shutter lag was a lot slower than an older mirrored DSLR, and by a factor of three!

Imagining Resources did a shutter lag test on a Nikon Z7 and on an older Nikon D850 flippy mirror camera, and the D850 was much faster. {Link: https://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/nikon-z7/nikon-z7A6.HTM )

"The Z7's full AF shutter lag measured 0.215 second with the mechanical shutter (default mode), 0.207 second with electronic first curtain shutter (EFCS) enabled and 0.156 second when using the all electronic shutter. By comparison, the D850 managed only 0.076 second with the mechanical shutter, and that includes flipping its mirror up out of the way."

Only mentioning this because I sometimes shoot with flashbulbs and I need to have a computer control the timing for the flashbulb's ignition and getting it up to peak lumens, and then triggering the shutter. It all happens in milliseconds so the timing is critical as flashbulbs are sort of expensive now (e.g. The FF33 bulb runs about $55 each so don't want to blow bulbs that aren't at peak lumens when shutter fires. https://rogergeorge.com/products/flash-bulb-pf-330 ).
 

Michael Meissner

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Well in general the phase detect auto focus used by DSLRs tends to be faster than the contrast detect auto focus used by most mirrorless cameras. But note with phase detect auto focus you are limited to a specific number of points, and often times you might need to adjust the focusing to fine tune the display. Contrast detect auto focus can in general can use any point to focus on (though by default it can be tricky to select points not provided by the camera). There are some hybrid cameras (like the E-m1 mark II/III, E-m1x, and E-m5 mark III) that can combine both types of focusing.

Two other factors are the lens motor speed (including whether the motor is optimized for phase detect auto focus or contrast detect auto focus) and the wide open aperture of the lens.
 

GBarrington

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Well in general the phase detect auto focus used by DSLRs tends to be faster than the contrast detect auto focus used by most mirrorless cameras. But note with phase detect auto focus you are limited to a specific number of points, and often times you might need to adjust the focusing to fine tune the display. Contrast detect auto focus can in general can use any point to focus on (though by default it can be tricky to select points not provided by the camera). There are some hybrid cameras (like the E-m1 mark II/III, E-m1x, and E-m5 mark III) that can combine both types of focusing.

Two other factors are the lens motor speed (including whether the motor is optimized for phase detect auto focus or contrast detect auto focus) and the wide open aperture of the lens.
My first reaction to this thread is that I had not noticed slower firing speeds. Maybe it is possible that your explanation explains it somewhat. (That, or my level of awareness is somewhat lacking!)
 

fortwodriver

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I wonder if the timing on the DSLR is faster because it's using its predictive AF to get the lens to the right spot while the mirror is lifting. I remember reading that Nikon and Canon's AF systems could drive the lens to the spot they needed long after the AF sensor was disabled. Once it had the initial reading, the mirror was free to rise as the lens was racking.
 

Mack

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Too bad M and FP shutter synch are absent from modern cameras. I didn't even know you could still buy flashbulbs any more! $55? OMG :doh:

Agree. Seems it could be some extra setting buried in the menu as it is a simple delay of the shutter with the faster output trigger to the hot shoe. Maybe some pro model add on.

As to the focus, when I shoot with the flashbulbs I needed to use manual focus since these lenses vary too much in time acquiring a focus lock. Sometimes they seem to hunt for a few seconds in some situations before they get a AF lcok. I recall talking to a Nikon service person that "they could speed up or slow down the AF in firmware, but it was a trade-off. Speeding up might result in more missed focus shots, while slowing it down resulted in more good focus shots but that led to complaints about AF being too slow for some people.

When I began using the Meggaflash PF-330 flashbulbs ( http://www.meggaflash.com/ ) , they told me "I had to come up with a shutter delay myself" (ugh!). There is an outfit called Camera Axe that makes/made a shutter delay setup ( http://www.cameraaxe.com/wp/ ). I made my own using an Arduino Uno R3 computer and delay for my old D800E which worked given some experimenting with the shutter delay and the bulbs (I used some cheaper Press 25 bulbs from an old thrift store before going to the expensive ones.). I think the shutter delay hold off, with AF on Manual, was about 350ms given the flashbulb's slow ramp-up to full lumen and the shutter lag needed. Might need to add a few ms to the mirrorless given it being slower than the DSLR. Dunno.

I never really thought a DSLR was faster, but given it takes time for mirrorless Live View to go dark with the shutter closing, and then exposing with the moving slit, and then reopening for Live View again, the old mirror-type beats it given the shutter is already in a trigger state with the mirror covering it so that's one mirrorless cycle that's out of the way which makes the DSLR shutter lag faster. I mistakenly thought the mirrorless would be faster than DSLR. Live and learn.
 

demiro

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After fifteen years in this hobby I'm in a better place when I read faster or better or sharper, or whatever. My brain's default setting is to change those words to fast enough, good enough and sharp enough.

I'm not saying that this difference in shutter lag is not important to some people [or many]. I'm just saying that the word enough generally keeps me in my happy place.
 

Derek

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Just FYI, Imaging Resource presets the lens used for these measurements to the correct focus distance. This quote is from the Panny G95 performance page:

"To minimize the effect of different lens' focusing speed, we test AF-active shutter lag with the lens already set to the correct focal distance."

So, they do try to control for focus-motor speed as best they can to get a "pure" shutter lag. They also test the shutter lag in prefocused and manual focus modes. I find their shutter-lag tests useful, but, as always, just a piece of the perfect-camera-search puzzle (see @demiro's post above).
 
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