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MFT Noob - My Lens Purchses

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by Chottobaka, Oct 7, 2018.

  1. Chottobaka

    Chottobaka New to Mu-43

    6
    Oct 6, 2018
    SoCal
    Jim
    I am a MFT virgin. I have been a Nikon and Canon film and DSLR shooter -- straddling the line between casual and enthusiast. My main camera is a Canon 80D. For some inexplicable reason, I decided to go with a tiny sensor, fewer pixels, limited AF capabilities, and a great form factor by adding an Olympus OM-D E10 Mk III. Not a downgrade by any means, just a new and very different flavor. The form factor and the lens options intrigue the hell out of me.

    Yes, I know the Mk III UI has been overhauled, and maybe not for the better, but that's not a big deal for me. This will be my small travel camera -- something I can keep in my EDC, use for spontaneous still photography, hiking and walkabout 4K video. I really have no desire to delve too deeply into another system at this point, so the "dumbed down" UI is fine with me. I don't have enough room in my head right now.

    I got a deal on a reconditioned Mk III from Olympus, which came with the 14-42mm EZ kit lens. I have purchased the 17mm 1.8 and the 45mm 1.8. I am noodling with the idea of adding the 12-40mm Pro down the road.

    I do a mix of everything, but street and just a bit of landscape will be a primary focus for this camera. Handheld long exposure and 4K, plus good nighttime capabilities were important factors in me making the jump.

    Am I on the right track lens-wise. Any other recommendations? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Michael Meissner

    Michael Meissner Mu-43 Regular

    It always depends on what you want to shoot, budget, etc.

    One popular lens that is often fairly cheap to add as a companion is the Olympus 40-150mm f/4-5.6, as it gives you the telephoto range for travel.

    Or you can go like I did, and get the 14-150mm mark II as a general purpose vacation lens. Sure it isn't a great low light lens, but it is nice just to slap the lens on the camera, and not worry about changing lenses for outdoor shots. After my 12-40mm, the 14-150mm mark II is my most used micro 4/3rds lens.

    I do have the 12-40mm f/2.8 lens, and it is a great lens. I find I use my primes (20mm f/1.7 and 45mm f/1.8) less since often f/2.8 is fast enough for indoor no flash shoots. But every so often I find I need that extra stop of light, and out they come. Note, it will make your E-m10 lens heavy, and it is bigger than your current lenses (but not as big as the Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens is).

    The other small lens I have that I don't use all that often, but when I need a wider lens, it is useful, is the Olympus 9-18mm. If you are on a limited budget, it might make sense to wait to see if you are constantly shooting at 14mm and want wider (or 12mm if you go for the 12-40mm).

    The alternative to the 12-40mm might be one of the two Panasonic lenses (12-35mm f/2.8 mark I or II or the 12-60mm f/2.8-4). Note, on Panasonic lenses, the zoom and focus rings operate opposite of the Olympus lenses, and they don't have the manual clutch ring that the 17mm and 12-40mm have.

    I recently picked up the Panasonic 35-100mm mark I f/2.8 lens, and it is useful for indoor theater/wedding/etc. lenses where you are further back than the 12-40mm lens can reach, but like the other pro lenses, it is not cheap. But for me, it was a lot cheaper used (and much smaller, lighter) than the Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 pro lens is.

    Generally I recommend shooting with the lenses you have, but keep a log (on paper or in your phone) of each time you feel you are being hindered by the lack of a lens. If you are shooting in low light environments, then perhaps another prime of a different focal length. If you are at the wide end, obviously think about a wider lens, and the same for the telephoto end, if you miss shots due to changing lenses, perhaps a superzoom. I find myself however hovering where I have a couple of lenses that make sense some times, but it isn't enough to make me get the next new shiny.
     
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  3. Bushboy

    Bushboy Mu-43 Veteran

    312
    Apr 22, 2018
    NZ
    Charlie
    Your lenses are good. Probably all you need....
     
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  4. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    so, like, you didn't buy m43 because that's barely different to your 80D sensor size ... or indeed other metrics
    Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX80 vs Canon EOS 80D | DxOMark
     
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  5. discus277

    discus277 Mu-43 Regular

    74
    Jan 11, 2018
    Fripp Island, South Carolina
    Jim
    I have a PEN f and 6 lenses.....the Oly17mm 1.8 easily gets the most use by far....seems to be my go to lens
     
  6. ADemuth

    ADemuth Mu-43 Veteran

    300
    Jan 27, 2017
    Koror, Palau
    Yep. If it were me, that 17mm would be glued to it (I like the 15-20mm focal range) I lust after that O45 every time I peek into it's showcase thread, but can't really justify it - I barely use the 40-150 I have at any FL.

    Play around with that kit lens. It's nice enough, just not terribly fast. You may find you want something wider.
     
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  7. Chottobaka

    Chottobaka New to Mu-43

    6
    Oct 6, 2018
    SoCal
    Jim
    Thanks to all of you for the feedback. I appreciate it. I think the 17mm will probably be my bread and butter lens. And, I will give the kit lens a chance.
     
  8. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    Hi

    somehow this point was absent in what I intended to say above (I was distracted in posting it)

    to me lens choice is highly subjective and very dependent on what *you* do. So really (as you say you're a newbie) I recommend that you go with the method: "try and learn" ... its the only way to really know. Don't take what others say to guide you in terms of lens choice (well and with a sprinkle of common sense that can be extented to everything people may advise you on). Millennia later this is still true:
    “Everything we hear is an opinion, not a fact. Everything we see is a perspective, not the truth.”
    ― Marcus Aurelius

    Good points here too ...


    :) 
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2018
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  9. Chottobaka

    Chottobaka New to Mu-43

    6
    Oct 6, 2018
    SoCal
    Jim
    Yes, I agree entirely. And I used my gut to select my lenses for this system. I do tend to have pretty good guts based on previous experience. Just looking for others' hands on experiences. Your point is well taken.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  10. Chottobaka

    Chottobaka New to Mu-43

    6
    Oct 6, 2018
    SoCal
    Jim
    GTFO. These are apple and oranges, notwithstanding what the specs are on paper. I use paper to start my charcoal chimneys when firing up my smoker.

    There are times the heft of the 80D, with the battery grip and its controls, feel perfect -- especially with vertical orientation. It's a great all-rounder in my experience. Very good with moving subjects. Dual Pixel AF is nothing short of amazing. Locks on subjects and provides a smooth, cinematic effect. Arguably, best in class. I also prefer an optical view finder. Like I said, apples and oranges.

    I am not trying to get into a pissing contest comparing formats. Like I said, not better or worse, just a different flavor.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  11. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    So why make the false statements about it being a tiny sensor when there is like only a small percentage difference?

    Sounded like a put down to me ....
     
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  12. Chottobaka

    Chottobaka New to Mu-43

    6
    Oct 6, 2018
    SoCal
    Jim
    You obviously have "tiny sensor" issues. And while we're at it -- factually speaking -- there is substantial difference between MFT and APSC sensor sizes. That did not stop me from dipping into the system, because I find many aspects of it to be both intriguing and attractive. I also find the Olympus form factor to be irresistible.
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  13. PakkyT

    PakkyT Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 20, 2015
    New England
    Hi Jim and welcome to micro43.

    I too like your lenses. On my old 4/3rds equipment (pre-micro mount but same sensor size) we didn't have a lot of primes so my 1-2 punch were the 12-60 and 50-200 Olympus lenses. When I switched to micro, I kept using both (I have the E-M1 which supports those two old lenses) but starting adding micro lenses. Two of the first ones I bought were the Panasonic 12-35/2.8 and the Oly 17/1.8 I got the pair from a seller here for a great price. I LOVED the 17/1.8 and added the 45/1.8. A while later I had the 25/1.8 on my Amazon wish list but didn't really think I wanted it thinking the 17 would be the one I would mostly used. My wife ended up getting me the 25 for my birthday and dang if it didn't take over as my favorite lens.

    Anyway, typically depending on what I am shooting, I leave the house with either my zooms or my primes. Even on long weekend vacations where I won't have access to them all, I will only bring my 17/25/45 f1.8 trio and no zooms. Other times if I am not sure what I will be shooting then it had been the Panny 12-35/2.8.

    So as you said, down the road, the 12-40 PRO would be an excellent choice for that do everything zoom, but also you might look into the 25/1.8 to round out your own trio for those times when you are perfectly happy carry 3 small primes with you instead.
     
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  14. Chottobaka

    Chottobaka New to Mu-43

    6
    Oct 6, 2018
    SoCal
    Jim
    Thanks for the warm welcome and advice. You are reading my mind. I did not want to go ape-$*t with immediate lens purchases, but was thinking of the 25/1.8 to fill the gap -- winding up with 35mm-equivalents of 34mm, 50mm and 90 mm. 12-40mm might be the icing on the cake for my use. :) 
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
  15. ac12

    ac12 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    671
    Apr 24, 2018
    I primarily shoot APS-C Nikon.
    I got my m4/3 Olympus E-M1 for travel with a smaller lighter travel kit. And on my vacation it delivered what I wanted without the bulk and weight. But even so, after 2 weeks, I was worn out.
    My kit is:
    • Panasonic 12-60/3.5-5.6 as my primary lens,
    • Olympus 17/1.8 as my low light indoor lens, and
    • Olympus 40-150/4-5.6 as my LONG lens.
    When I got the 12-60, I had looked at the 14-150 super zoom. I shoot the Nikon 18-140 DX/APS-C lens, and really liked the super zoom range. But for 90% of the time, I don't need to go beyond 60mm, and I can save weight and leave the 40-150 at home. The 14-150 meant I would be carrying the heavier lens 100% of the time. I also valued the extra 2mm on the wide end more than the extra 90mm on the long end.
    But if you don't need to go to 12mm, and 14mm is adequate, the 14-150 is a great general purpose and travel lens. And you don't have to change lenses to reach out to 150mm, as I have to do with the 12-60.

    IMHO, the 14-42EZ is a great basic lens, and compact when turned off. The E-M10 + 14-42EZ makes a great compact kit. In fact I have been thinking about getting one myself, just because it is so compact when off.

    The 17 and 45 as your fast primes makes sense.
    I have the 17, and am thinking about getting the 45.
    The 17 and 45 pair is similar to the 35mm film pair of 35 + 85.

    Do you need a longer lens? You current kit maxes out at 45mm.
    The inexpensive 40-150R is one option, to complement your 14-42.

    The need for a PRO lens depends on lighting or lack of it (where the slower zooms have trouble), and when you want the max image quality. But it comes at a cost of greater size, weight and $$$ cost.

    I agree with Michael about keeping a shooting log. That way you can document when and how often you run into a situation where you do not have the right lens. This would be the support to making a better decision about what lens to get next.
     
  16. pellicle

    pellicle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 10, 2010
    Kiillarney, OzTrailEYa
    pellicle
    sorry, but I've been in this system since it started ... I was also in APS-C before that but sold out of that years ago.

    Here is a visual for you ...
    sensorSizes.jpg
    Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)



    do tell ... as I mentioned, you were the one who started this post with language which I simple corrected ...

    Maybe you weren't aware that 43rds is x2 crop and APS-C not far away at x1.6

    Since we're making assumptions you're obviously maths challenged.

    I still use 4x5 sheet and 120 roll ... here's just the 120 roll compared to Full Frame:

    35mmVS6x9.jpg
    Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)



    If you said you said you'd come from 645 digital or even Full Frame I might accept tiny, but hey, what's the facts got to do with anything right?

    P.S. And are you sure it's only chotto .. totemo mitai ka naa
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2018
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  17. ToxicTabasco

    ToxicTabasco Mu-43 Top Veteran

    707
    Jul 2, 2018
    South West USA
    Congratulations on upgrading your cameras. I think you're on the right track. And you'll be surprised how good the MFT system is once you push it to the limits. And, the 12-40 Pro is the best lens you can get for that range on that camera. Don't worry if your MFT takes over a lot of your DSLR duties once you get the 12-40 Pro. It happens to a lot of people who make the switch.
     
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  18. gnarlydog australia

    gnarlydog australia Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Feb 23, 2015
    Brisbane, Australia
    Damiano Visocnik
    If money is burning a hole in your pocket right now and you said "landscapes" and "Handheld long exposure", nothing scream louder than the M.Zuiko 12-100 f4 Pro, with its dual I.S. system people report of taking hand-held images (that are sharp) at 5 seconds.
    One lens to do them all?
    Of course, no longer that small :( 
     
  19. archaeopteryx

    archaeopteryx Mu-43 Top Veteran Subscribing Member

    550
    Feb 25, 2017
    And, considering its dual IS abilities, in the darkness bind them.
     
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  20. bigboysdad

    bigboysdad Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 25, 2013
    Sydney/ London
    Excellent start, I started with the Pany 20 and Oly 45. Spend enough time with the 2 lenses you've purchased and honestly, you'll work it out yourself what lens route you go down.
     
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