Mercury Transit, 2019

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Not good viewing here in Southwest British Columbia, but to me, the clouds make it more interesting!
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No, that wasn't very interesting. Here's a crop of the SE quadrant:
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I used Astro-Physics™ AstroSolar™ Safety Film 5.0 (which I had bought for the solar eclipse a couple years ago) on an Olympus OM 500mm ƒ/8 Reflex lens:
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So, this was pretty underwhelming. Anyone have any better shots?
 

acnomad

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I watched the live stream on Slooh. They cycled the feed from large telescopes in several locations, and it was quite interesting, but I don't think there was much of a photographic opportunity with this particular event. Not that I fail to appreciate the significance of this rare occurrence, but I'm actually thankful we had cloudy skies at my location today - it allowed me to simply enjoy watching it. Having said that, I do rather like the image you captured. As you point out, the clouds add character to it.
 

archaeopteryx

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I don't think there was much of a photographic opportunity with this particular event.
Yeah, this is more or less the best I came up with, though I do have a range of similar positions for the little black dot. The sun was behind thin clouds or fog until the last half hour or so of the transit but, on a few occasions, a little grey dot was possible to discern somewhat earlier. Mostly all the clouds and fog did was make things just blurry enough to wash out Mercury.

This one is the most different I have from the one already posted where Mercury was reasonably visible. It's... not very different. Panasonic 100-300 II at 300. I don't have anything longer, though this event was really more a telescope thing so it wouldn't have made much difference. With @Bytesmiths' mirror Mercury would be five pixels across instead of two or three.
P1070470 web.JPG
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(which I had bought for the solar eclipse a couple years ago)
I reused my 2017 setup as well (a stack of coating based IR NDs, probably using Inconel 600, totaling 17.5 stops).
 
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archaeopteryx

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Discussion in the design thread aside, I'm sure it was more adequate than Randall Munroe's ND0 arrangement.
transit_of_mercury.png
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"For some reason the water in my pool is green and there's a weird film on the surface."​
 
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Geoff Cole

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Transit of Mercury, E-M1 Mk II, OM 500mm f8.0 mirror lens, 2X teleconverter, solar filter material sandwiched between two 72mm UV filters.
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felipegeek

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Basically, we all took a picture of a small dot on a bigger dot. I think it's cool because the next one Mercury transit won't happen until 2032 and the next Venus one is much further away in 2117 (well beyond our life expectancies)

Shot with E-M1 with adapted Nikon 300mm AF lens and Nikon 2x teleconverter (both circa 1987) with Solomark metal adjustable mount that uses Baader Planetarium solar film for protection (bought it for 2017 eclipse which was a washout for me)
Some processing in LR to rid of a bit of green chromatic aberration and clarify the image a bit along with a crop to about 25% of frame.


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archaeopteryx

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Basically, we all took a picture of a small dot on a bigger dot.
Yeah. NASA SDO doesn't have an atmosphere in the way, though, has some nice etalons for the bigger dot, and most of the imagery can be had with the sun not quite 4000 pixels across if one wants detail (e.g. SunToday).
It'd be nice to have the money for long glass and an etalon (DayStar, Meade, Lunt Solar) but I'm pretty sure I'd spend it on other things. I enjoyed photographing the transit but mostly because I found a nice spot on a pleasant day for the waiting. Sorting through the intervalometer sequences to find the images with the best seeing, not so interesting.
 

felipegeek

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Yeah. NASA SDO doesn't have an atmosphere in the way, though, has some nice etalons for the bigger dot, and most of the imagery can be had with the sun not quite 4000 pixels across if one wants detail (e.g. SunToday).
It'd be nice to have the money for long glass and an etalon (DayStar, Meade, Lunt Solar) but I'm pretty sure I'd spend it on other things. I enjoyed photographing the transit but mostly because I found a nice spot on a pleasant day for the waiting. Sorting through the intervalometer sequences to find the images with the best seeing, not so interesting.
Having access to space-based cameras that see in various frequencies of light and seeing it interpreted and displayed during events like these has got to be a cool experience. It certainly would be for me. Thanks for sharing the video!
 

archaeopteryx

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Having access to space-based cameras that see in various frequencies of light and seeing it interpreted and displayed during events like these has got to be a cool experience.
At least a few solar observatories streamed the transit so you might look on YouTube. I haven't watched any of them but a quick search gives me several from NASA plus Lowell Observatory, Griffith Observatory, and a few others.

Personally, I think I could probably get enduring enjoyment from just an 0.6 Å H-alpha etalon. Easier and vastly cheaper just to download imagery, though.
 
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