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Mega Panoramic Composition

Discussion in 'Open Discussion' started by Kadmos, Jan 23, 2013.

  1. Kadmos

    Kadmos Mu-43 Regular

    26
    Oct 4, 2012
    Hello there,

    Ok I know that to create a panoramic photo you can place your camera on a tripod and then take consecutive pics panning a bit every time , before using a software like photoshop to add up all the images in post to create the panoramic image.

    My question is: could one take additional photos above and below the ones taken in the example above then take all of the pix into a software to get an even larger image and feild of view or would programs get confused? I would still overlap borders ofcourse but I would be taking much more photos and in all directions.. So for each photo taken I would tilt the camera upwards to take one above then tilt it downwards to take one from below (maybe more if needed), before panning to take the next section of the panorama and doing same thing again.If this can work, then what program can I use for that, would it work in photoshop?
    Thanks :)
     
  2. elavon

    elavon Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 1, 2012
    Tel Aviv Israel
    Ehud
    You can do it in Photoshop. The program is trying to merge photos according to content.
     
  3. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
  4. nsd20463

    nsd20463 Mu-43 Regular

    116
    Apr 30, 2011
    Santa Cruz, CA
    I have done it in hugin. It works fine.

    -Nicolas
     
  5. Al.

    Al. Mu-43 Veteran

    372
    Jul 3, 2010
    Hull, East Yorkshire, UK
    Alan
    I read once that there is a way....

    take 3 rows of panarama's, top ,middle and bottom

    Process each row in your panorama software, giving 3 panorama's

    Then merge the 3 rows with your panarama software.

    If it works don't hesitate to post your results
     
  6. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
    I am curious to know whether the panorama software could stitch all columns and rows together at one go, or if it can only handle either horizontal or vertical stitching one at a time. Hope others can share their experience...
     
  7. savvy

    savvy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Sep 28, 2012
    SE Essex, UK
    Les
    Ryan Brenizer does this to create some amazing large shallow D0F images (mainly for wedding photos). He used to do it all in PS, although I believe I read he uses Autopano Giga software now to make the process easier.
     
  8. Kadmos

    Kadmos Mu-43 Regular

    26
    Oct 4, 2012
    This is exactly what I was trying to ask:)
     
  9. savvy

    savvy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Sep 28, 2012
    SE Essex, UK
    Les
    Kolor Autopano Pro or Giga can do it all in one go.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. atomic

    atomic Mu-43 Veteran

    224
    Nov 3, 2011
    Hugin will also do it in one go, and it's free. It's not quite as reliable or easy to use as Autopano, but it'll save you quite a bit of money. The software that comes with a Gigapan unit works very well, as well, so long as you use the gigapan unit to generate the shots for it.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
    Do you know if Microsoft ICE could do it in one go also?
     
  12. RobWatson

    RobWatson Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Yup, all in one go. I did one ~570MB
     
  13. mkallstrom

    mkallstrom Mu-43 Regular

    138
    May 3, 2012
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Magnus
    This i 18 shots (in portrait orientation), handheld and stitched together in Photoshop. I haven't uploaded the high resolution version to flickr but I think it shows what is possible to do with stitching.

    Edit: If I remember correctly I panned up and down from left to right, but Photoshop seems to be able to line the shots up correctly regardless of shooting order.

    6911992887_827998db71_z.
    Mont Blanc by Magnus Källström, on Flickr
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. marcsitkin

    marcsitkin Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Jan 24, 2013
    Harwich, MA USA
    Marc Sitkin
    I would suggest the software PTGUI. It's available for Mac or Windows, works very well, and can allow you to compensate for many problems you can run into. You may also want to look into a nodal ninja bracket if you plan on doing a lot of this work. It can really speed things up.

    This is my first posting on this site. I stumbled upon it while researching a 4/3 camera I hope to use for my panoramic work.

    You can see an example of a multi row, multi column images here and a short article on it's being assembled
     
  15. inkista

    inkista Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 13, 2012
    San Diego, CA
    Depends on the program. But most can take a grid as well as a single row.

    However, if you want to cover the entire sphere for a 360x180 pano:

    8335972190_02a1f76264_z.
    Panasonic G3, Rokinon/Samyang 7.4mm f/3.5 fisheye. tripod. Nodal Ninja 3. 6 shots in portrait mode , rotated in yaw by 60-degree intervals, zenith (straight up) and nadir (straight down) shots. (Actually 18 images, 3 sets of shots bracketed @±2EV exposure fused and stitched in PTGui at the same time). Interactive view.

    then the number of packages that will consistently work gets quite a bit smaller. Most of the stitchers that can do this are based on Helmut Dersch's PanoramaTools (at least in part). Hugin (open source) and PTGui (commercial) would be the two packages I'd point most folks to.
     
  16. savvy

    savvy Mu-43 Top Veteran

    714
    Sep 28, 2012
    SE Essex, UK
    Les
    • Like Like x 1
  17. JohnF

    JohnF Mu-43 Regular

    183
    Apr 1, 2010
    Oberursel, Germany
    Nobody heard of gigapan?

    It's a robotic tripod head that does this extremely quickly and efficiently. I've been using one or another now for the last four years (was in the beta program) and it's perfect for what it does: you attach the camera with lens, set the FOV, show the system your upper left hand corner and your lower right hand corner, and the robotic head does the rest, moving the camera, taking the picture, moving to the next, etc.

    You can either buy their software (if you buy one of their units, you get a copy) or use whatever else you want to: their software is, as far as I am concerned, heads above all others when it comes to speed and efficiency, if not stitching quality.

    GigaPan | High-Resolution Images | Panoramic Photography | GigaPixel Images. If you pop over there, search my user name and you'll find over 100 hosted there. Not all great, but hey, I've been using their gear since before it could be bought. :) No connection to them, just a satisfied user.

    Oh, and I use my Epic Pro with my E30 and the Oly cable. Works great.
     
  18. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    622
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    As the posts in this thread already indicate, most of the leading pano assembly software can handle multiple rows.

    Personally, I haven't found much need for multiple rows when shooting true panos. I generally find that a single row with each image a vertical image will accomplish what I want.

    That said, there are times when I need a wider lens for a relatively normal aspect ratio image. This sample is a four shot image, 2 rows of 2 images, that was shot hand-held and assembled in PS. It was shot with a Pany G1 with the 14-45 at 14mm. The full resolution assembled image, after trimming, is approx 25mp.
     

    Attached Files:

  19. marcsitkin

    marcsitkin Mu-43 Veteran

    307
    Jan 24, 2013
    Harwich, MA USA
    Marc Sitkin
    [​IMG]

    I've just started using a gigapan with an EP2 body. Fits well, and my first trial was with a 50mm f1/8 Oly adapted lens. Unfortunately, I found that focal length was way too long. My 180 degree view was 108 frames. I got it stitched up in PT Gui, and ended up with a very nice, but very huge file. I've just acquired a 28mm Canon f2.8 which is going on today. Here's an article on the process. Please feel free to leave comments or questions http://marcsitkinphotography.com/2013/03/21/roosevelt-bridge-stuart-fl-panorama/

    While the gigapan is "fun" in an automated way, I like the control of the Nodal Ninja for shots with people or moving objects (boats, blimps, bikes). The ninja makes it easy to go back and reshoot a frame to position an element where I want it, or hold up on the pan a bit for something to clear a frame. It takes a bit more skill to use, but as long as you don't forget a frame, is very reliable.
     
  20. JohnF

    JohnF Mu-43 Regular

    183
    Apr 1, 2010
    Oberursel, Germany
    Oh, the gigapans let you back up as well, and have the added advantage of being very precise about it. You can pause as well to wait for people moving through...

    The problem with using wide-angle lenses for panoramas is yes, you need fewer images, but the whole point is to get the extremely high quality that you can only get with long lenses and many photos. Further, by using many images, you reduce distortion that you have inherent with using wide-angle lenses. But hey, whatever floats your boat. :)