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Magnification confusion?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by manju69, Jul 13, 2011.

  1. manju69

    manju69 Mu-43 Veteran

    493
    Jul 1, 2011
    Stroud, UK
    Pete
    Hi

    Am loving my EPL1 and decided to buy a legacy macro lens to play around with. Picked up a Olympus 50mm f3.5 macro and an adapter that are on their way from USA.

    Then, as I investigated I saw that this lens is only 1:2 (0.5x) not a true macro 1:1 this could be fine...but

    I looked at the specs of my 14-42 kit lens and it's says it's 0.22 or x0.48 (35mm equivalent)

    So does that mean the 50mm will be doubled on the EPL1? (i know its focal length will be) or will it be 0.5 (not much more than my kit lens)

    I am confused!

    Also the kit lens' closest focusing is around 20cm but as far as I can gather the Olympus will get me closer, therefore bigger? My newbie questions are

    Does the magnification change when you use a legacy lens on the micro four thirds body?

    And more importantly! Will this old lens get me better macro shots than my kit lens? (closer and sharper)

    Thanks
     
  2. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    Focal length is not doubled. The minimum focus distance is the same regardless of sensor. But because the 4/3 sensor is tinier, 1/2 the size, your subject will be cropped at the center, in effect giving you an equivalent of 1:1 on a full frame sensor.

    To answer your question, you'll get twice as large images with the Olympus Macro 3.5 than with the kit lens.

    Magnification doesn't change but if you want you can just multiply by 2 to get equivalent magnification as a rule of thumb.
     
  3. pxpaulx

    pxpaulx Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    Midwest
    Paul
    Lots of discussion in this thread, including examples I posted of a comparison of my 50mm Pentax macro used on a pentax body (aps-c, 1.5x crop) and a GF1, 2x crop, here:

    noob-lens-questions-infinity-focus-distance-what-macro

    Although you're discussing a 1:2 lens and most of the posts were regarding 1:1 lenses, my samples half way down the first page are a decent representation of how the crop factor affects the image.
     
  4. Alanroseman

    Alanroseman Super Moderator Emeritus

    Dec 21, 2010
    New England
    To lessen the confusion, in simple terms.

    50mm Pentax Lens is - 100mm when coupled to your µ43 body (35mm equivalent)

    14-42 Kit zoom is - 28-84 mm in 35mm equivalent

    It is a very simple factor of x2, any focal length for µ43.

    The information offered so far regards to sensor size etc. while correct, is understandably confusing to a new shooter.

    Just use the x2 to find for 35mm equivalent focal length.

    Alan
     
  5. pxpaulx

    pxpaulx Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 19, 2010
    Midwest
    Paul
    Alan, when it comes to Macro lenses, the 2x hard rule kind of doesn't apply. I approach a macro from a different angle. The reason being that if I take my 50mm macro and my 100mm macro and shoot both at their closest focus of 1:1 magnification, they will produce the exact same image! Yes, they will produce different images on FF, aps-c or m43 sensors, but the different focal lengths do not have an affect on the 1:1, only the actual sensor size itself. The only perceptible difference will be that the 50mm macro will be about 2 inches from the subject, while the 100mm will be about a foot away when actually taking the pictures (not exact distances, but for illustration). A macro of 1:2 will convey an image that covers twice the area of a 1:1 macro, and so on with 1:3, 1:4 (beyond 1:2 is getting outside of a true macro though imo).
     
  6. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    The magnification ratio does not change due to crop factor. If you took a photo of an insect the measures 6mm in length, the image captured on an m43 sensor would measure 6mm long at 1:1 magnification, it would also measure 6mm long at 1:1 magnification if you used a 2 1/4" film camera. The crop factor is like the size of the playing field, the image size does not change, it just takes up more real estate on a smaller sensor..
     
  7. Alanroseman

    Alanroseman Super Moderator Emeritus

    Dec 21, 2010
    New England
    Hi,

    Correct. That said, I was not addressing Macro lenses. Just the very basic most simplistic rule of adapted lenses.

    That's it. It seems to me that adding lots of technospeak, tossing sensor and crop factors in there isn't very helpful to a new user. All of that information is available online for reading at one's leisure.

    So, by the time a new user posts here asking the question, It's my opinion that they've been unable to decipher the myriad verbose explanations offered everywhere else.

    So very simply. Apply a factor of X2 to find for the equivalent 35mm focal length. Macro as pointed out is a whole other ballgame...

    Alan





     
  8. sylvesterii

    sylvesterii Mu-43 Regular

    26
    Jun 21, 2011
    I always thought that a 50mm Macro and a 100mm macro both at 1:1 will produce the same image for a flat subject, but not for one that has dimension, and the focal length would have an affect on that, wouldn't it?
     
  9. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    It is because he already knows that equivalent focal length doubles. He is asking if magnification also doubles. Your post doesn't address his question at all.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. manju69

    manju69 Mu-43 Veteran

    493
    Jul 1, 2011
    Stroud, UK
    Pete
    Thanks for your responses.
    My main question was answered I think in that I will get twice as large images with the adapted macro than my kit lens. I am hoping i got that right! as otherwise I may have wasted my cash...

    The rest of the thread is not totally clear, but I will keep investigating. and more replies are welcome if they help to clarify.
     
  11. Magnification ratio is the relative size of the projected image on the sensor plane vs the actual object size e.g. A 2cm high object would create a 2cm image using a 1:1 macro lens. Sensor size doesn't alter the magnification ratio, but it will alter the effective magnification.

    This means that by using a smaller sensor (m4/3 instead of full-frame) you are capturing a smaller portion of the projected image, which effectively gives you a higher magnification image.

    As an example, compact camera lenses don't have particularly good magnification ratios (as defined in the first paragraph), but because of the tiny sensor size they take very good close-ups because of the effective magnification.
     
  12. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    I'm in effect, spinning like a top !!!!!