LUMIX G9 for Milky Way?

ToxicTabasco

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I am sure full frame is better, but the G9 is good enough for me. I took these the other night near Fort Davis, Texas. These are static shots with no tracker. I did a few 20/30 shot sets to stack but I haven't processed those yet.

Nice shots you have. That Texas milky way looks great. The core looks much higher in the sky than what we get here in the Mojave Desert.
 

fader

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Thank you Fader. On June 3, I took a chance with clouds up during the sunset. And, by the end of twilight, the sky cleared (except for some haze on the horizon). Thus, my first crack at the Milky Way with the Lumix G9 and Pana/Leica 15mm f/1.7: it was a long 9 months of waiting. And, the results were pretty good. Most likely the last chance for the horizon milky way this year. Here are the results.

A shot at the end of blue hour (About 2100 hrs), and the milky ways is rising
View attachment 752337

Below, further down the road near the water tanks. A 2 row panorama.
View attachment 752336

Below a 3 row panorama, and last milky way horizon shot for the year (for me anyway).
View attachment 752338

Test results of the milky way photography with Lumix G9.
The outcomes are IME as good as my Nikon D5500 and D7200. With light painting, colors and details in the foreground can be enhanced for more dynamics of the overall shot. The G9 will do one shot milky way exposures with fast wide lenses. However, IME Multi shot panoramas allow for 2 stops more noise reduction, and almost no sharpening is needed on the RW2 files. Thus, ISO 3200 @ 13 seconds is my standard for the dark night long exposures. And sometimes I'll use ISO 6400 with 10 second exposures. Nevertheless, either can be used shooting panorama with great outcomes as APSC cameras.

As for the lenses. Seems the 15mm f/1.7 prime allows a lot more light vs a f/2.8 zoom. That extra stop of light also allows for faster shutter speeds like 13 seconds vs 15 or 20 seconds. Thus, the optimal exposure I found with this set up is f/1.7 at 15mm, 13 second shutter, with ISO 3200 or 10 seconds at ISO 6400.

Keep in mind that the long exposure works for me and the look I go for with the milky way horizon shot. This is just one way to get this type of shot. There are many other techniques and settings that others use for the look they want.

Anyway, I hope this helps. Good luck on your milky way adventures.

Looks great -and I love the red. The core colors should stand out a lot more if you can get further away from town. Maybe I missed it earlier but does the G9 have a dark frame subtraction setting?
 

ToxicTabasco

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Looks great -and I love the red. The core colors should stand out a lot more if you can get further away from town. Maybe I missed it earlier but does the G9 have a dark frame subtraction setting?

Thank you fader. It's almost impossible to escape the Las Vegas city lights (the little glow on the left). This was about 102 miles south, and 5300ft elevation from Vegas. Also, the light in the middle is from Kingman also 100+ miles East. There was some haze on the horizon that night which also makes for the horizon shot challenge.

As for the G9 dark frame thing, it has a long exposure NR and high ISO NR. I keep the long exposure NR on at all times. Without it, there would be small specs on the shot. Luck the index rotor helps cut time between shots, and lines them up fast in the dark.
Index rotor head.jpg
Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
 
Last edited:

opiecat

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Joined
Mar 17, 2017
Messages
36
Thank you Fader. On June 3, I took a chance with clouds up during the sunset. And, by the end of twilight, the sky cleared (except for some haze on the horizon). Thus, my first crack at the Milky Way with the Lumix G9 and Pana/Leica 15mm f/1.7: it was a long 9 months of waiting. And, the results were pretty good. Most likely the last chance for the horizon milky way this year. Here are the results.

A shot at the end of blue hour (About 2100 hrs), and the milky ways is rising
View attachment 752337

Below, further down the road near the water tanks. A 2 row panorama.
View attachment 752336

Below a 3 row panorama, and last milky way horizon shot for the year (for me anyway).
View attachment 752338

Test results of the milky way photography with Lumix G9.
The outcomes are IME as good as my Nikon D5500 and D7200. With light painting, colors and details in the foreground can be enhanced for more dynamics of the overall shot. The G9 will do one shot milky way exposures with fast wide lenses. However, IME Multi shot panoramas allow for 2 stops more noise reduction, and almost no sharpening is needed on the RW2 files. Thus, ISO 3200 @ 13 seconds is my standard for the dark night long exposures. And sometimes I'll use ISO 6400 with 10 second exposures. Nevertheless, either can be used shooting panorama with great outcomes as APSC cameras.

As for the lenses. Seems the 15mm f/1.7 prime allows a lot more light vs a f/2.8 zoom. That extra stop of light also allows for faster shutter speeds like 13 seconds vs 15 or 20 seconds. Thus, the optimal exposure I found with this set up is f/1.7 at 15mm, 13 second shutter, with ISO 3200 or 10 seconds at ISO 6400.

Keep in mind that the long exposure works for me and the look I go for with the milky way horizon shot. This is just one way to get this type of shot. There are many other techniques and settings that others use for the look they want.

Anyway, I hope this helps. Good luck on your milky way adventures.

thanks! this is good detail on exposure, lens, aperture!
 

ToxicTabasco

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Never heard of a index rotator, so it handles the horizontal axis. For the vertical do you set that manually, or is there something similar for that axis?

Yes, I use the mu43 cameras in horizontal orientation with the index rotor. The monopod tilt head is used to adjust 30 degrees up for about 50% overlap on the vertical. When the milky way gets higher, 3 rows usually works.
 

ToxicTabasco

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thanks! this is good detail on exposure, lens, aperture!

Thank you. f/1.7 works great with the G9 for a good range of depth from stars to foreground. And with the range scale (the tiny line with flower and mountain), it's super easy to set manual focus to infinity. Much easier and more efficient than my DSLRs.
 
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