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LR 6 standalone vs CC now that android is available...

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by fsuscotphoto, Apr 23, 2015.

  1. fsuscotphoto

    fsuscotphoto Mu-43 Top Veteran

    819
    Feb 15, 2013
    St. Cloud, FL
    Ron
    Now I'm in a real quandary. I've really been wanting LR mobile, but until now it's only been available for IOS. Now with the advent of the Android version, I'm really having trouble deciding if I want CC or just will continue to use the upgrade. I'm done with IOS because of the lack of expandability of the storage. On the other hand I could just get a Surface Pro and use a "real" version of LR. My next tablet is going to be either an Android or Surface, it's just a decision now of what I'm willing to pay.

    I'd sure like some discussion of what others here think.
     
  2. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    I think no tablet has the screen real estate, CPU, GPU, memory, and apps to do what I can do on my MacBook Pro.
     
  3. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    The mid to high end Windows 8.1 tablets do have to horsepower, especially the high end devices running i5 and better processors, but I agree that the Android and iOS tablets are up to the task.

    Personally, I think the way to go is with the full version of either LrCC or Lr6 and use a Windows 8.1 (later 10) tablet. You need to use one that runs Win8.1/64bit and has adequate primary storage for your applications. Lr can't install (easily*) on the expansion card or any other removable media. A high end Window tablet with a 10"+ screen can be rather useful in the field. One with a i5 processor is even better, able to do real RAW processing. The iOS and Android apps can't actually process RAW files. They use the previews as proxys in their mini-Develop mode and simply return the adjustment instructions back to the desktop Lr when sync'd. The desktop Lr then can do the real work. When using the Windows version of Lr on a tablet you will lose the sync functions in the iOS and Android apps. You would have to manually export as catalog on the tablet and import from that catalog on the desktop to migrate your tablet images and adjustments to the desktop's catalog.

    I haven't tested it, my Win8.1 tablet is 32bit, but LrCC/6 for Windows has a "touch" mode that is supposed to be much like the Lr for iOS and Lr for Android interfaces. Without the touch mode you would need an HID (mouse, digitizer pen, trackball, ...) to do much work.

    I'm running Lr5 on my Dell Venue 8 Pro and find it functional with small catalogs and usable but slow when processing typical RAW files. I can get by with TouchMousePointer instead of a hardware HID, but it's much more functional when I connect a real mouse. I don't use Lr on my tablet very often, but it's there when needed. I run Lr on my big desktop box (i7, 8tb local HD, ...) regularily. The tablet is primarily a playback device

    *There are ways to map a second storage device, even a removable one like the typical tablet's microSD, to an otherwise empty folder on the main fixed drive. If you do this, you can install Lr to that folder and the files will actually be on the card. It still has to place the catalog file and preview cache on the fixed drive, but you can repeat the "trick" for that also. Regardless of how you install, you can always place the real image files on any drive(s) you wish.
     
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  4. Clint

    Clint Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 22, 2013
    San Diego area, CA
    Clint
    I don't think you'll be able to run LR CC/6 on a 32bit OS.
     
  5. MikeB

    MikeB Mu-43 Regular

    125
    Jun 10, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    I've got the Surface Pro 3, i7 CPU, and run full Lightroom on it. I either save my images to the internal SSD or to an external USB 3.0 drive. Since the surface has a micro-SD slot, I've switched to using micro-SD cards inside an adapter within my E-M1. The screen is reasonably large, has great pixel depth, and good color rendition. Overall, it's a great package for processing images when traveling. LR6 is supposed to be quite a bit quicker than LR5 when rendering on the Surface Pro, they are supposedly making better use of the GPU. I don't know if you do much retouching of your images with brushes, but the Surface's digitizer pen works really well for drawing directly on the image.

    I've used an iPad and a Nexus 7 tablet, and they are both great for tablet-type activities like reading books and web browsing, but I think the Surface is a far better choice is you want to do higher-end activities like image processing.
     
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  6. dwig

    dwig Mu-43 Top Veteran

    621
    Jun 26, 2010
    Key West FL
    Correct, that's why I stated in my second paragraph that the devices to look for should run 64bit Windows.

    Since the UI is unchanged between Lr5 and Lr6/CC, with the exception of a few very small additions, my experience with using Lr5 on a small screen is a good reference. My 8" screen is too small to be efficient to use; you have to work moderately slowly and be very careful with the mouse. A larger 10-12" display on a device in the MS Surface 3 / Surface 3 Pro class would be more practical.
     
  7. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    And no MacBook pro has the screen real estate, CPU, GPU and storage to do what I can do on my beast workstation at home. Compromises exist with every solution.

    Many of the tablet based apps for Android and IOS are optimised for the input, hardware and screens of tablets, and are extremely responsive and powerful for small batch editing.

    I think running Lightroom on a full Windows tablet is an option. But you need some kind of traditional input method as these apps were not designed around the inaccuracies of stubby fingers as input. However, in order to get the screen size and resolution, CPU power, and then lugging around a keyboard/mouse dock, you are back to small laptop size. So what it gained over a sleek laptop? I suppose if you buy one of the Wacom pens for the surface, you might have an option there.
     
  8. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Just depends on what you want to do. If this is going to be a primary machine that you want to be able to dock and use like a desktop/laptop, then get the surface. Keep in mind that not all Windows apps are designed as tablet first apps, so they may not work that great without the keyboard/mouse. And if you do go Windows tablet, make sure it is one with a "real" processor. Running desktop LR or CC on a Atom CPU is not going to be extremely enjoyable.

    If you want a portable solution to edit and share small batches on the go, then I'd get an android. You can get a lighter, cheaper tablet with all apps being tablet optimized for touch and slower hardware.

    As much as I hate iOS storage inflexibility, sometimes you might find a clearance or refurb ipad with 128GB is not much more than an Android with the same horsepower/screen and a 128GB SD card. So if you prefer iOS, just make sure you compare Apples to, uh, Apples? (Didn't mean to turn that into a pun... :)).
     
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  9. jziegler

    jziegler Mu-43 Veteran

    261
    Dec 15, 2012
    Salem County, New Jersey
    James
    Well, what do you want to do on the tablet?

    I tried a Windows tablet, even had lightroom 5 on it, I ddin't get along well with it. Lightroom's sliders and touch aren't a great match. When I had hardware problems with the tablet soon after I bought it, it went back for a refund instead of a repair.

    Lightroom on android doesn't have many of the features of the full version, but it's looking good to me for doing initial rough adjustments and sorting of images. The biggest problem that I have is that there is no way to import (other than phone/tablet taken photos) on Android and sync to CC/your computer. Seems like there should be a way to load from your memory card to the tablet and sync that to the cloud, so you can use just a tablet at times. That's where a Windows tablet would work better.

    So, think about what you want to do on the tablet, and that will help you decide.

    There are also other good editing apps for Android that tag metadata that is compatible with Lightroom. I'm looking at using another app when I travel to review photos, tag them, rate them, etc and then import the tagged and rated photos into Lightroom when I get home.
     
  10. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    Lightroom 6 now has a Touch Workshop mode that works with touch-enabled Windows PCs. And it's in the full version of Lightroom. No need for Lightroom Mobile which, lets be honest, is a pretty crippled application that doesn't let you do much of what makes Lightroom good. I do 99% of my photo editing on my desktop, but knowing that I could still get mobile goodness on my Surface Pro 3 if I wanted to was what led me to buy the standalone version of LR6 instead of CC.
     
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  11. jziegler

    jziegler Mu-43 Veteran

    261
    Dec 15, 2012
    Salem County, New Jersey
    James
    I was not aware of the new mode in Lightroom 6. That certainly could help.

    And I did admit that the mobile version doesn't have all of the features of the full version. But it does have some uses.

    My Samsung Galaxy tab S is much better hardware than the Lenovo Miix that I breifly had, and, for me, Android is a better touch OS than Windows. But full Lightroom is better than Lightroom Mobile. I personally chose the less powerful editor on the tablet what I like better for everyday tablet purposes over the better editor on the tablet. It was a tough decision.
     
  12. MikeB

    MikeB Mu-43 Regular

    125
    Jun 10, 2010
    Atlanta, GA
    I just saw the announcement of the touch interface mode, and am looking forward to trying in on my Surface. But for Lightroom, I tend to use either a blutooth mouse or the Surface's pen, both work just fine.
     
  13. fsuscotphoto

    fsuscotphoto Mu-43 Top Veteran

    819
    Feb 15, 2013
    St. Cloud, FL
    Ron
    Well, I should have been more to point. I was really asking if I could go with LR CC since it offers mobile for an Android tablet, or if I'd be better off going with LR standalone and going with a Surface and not bother with mobile. I think I've got my answer and will save for a Surface.

    Thanks everyone!