Love to hear from newer digital users who purchased an Olympus OM-D camera - learning experience/curve

Annie

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  • I would highly recommend the book, Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson if you're in the early stages of your photographic journey and learning curve
  • The main things I miss from a FF camera / my canon are: AF performance (m43 is getting there, but I still think my Canon bodies were/are better) and low light performance. I cant use my EM1.2 above 1600 and get anything usable (just my preference, others might disagree
The m43 system for sure gives the most amount of reach for the cheapest price and smallest size/weight. The 40-150 f2.8 lens is a beauty of a lens, incredibly sharp, and if paired with the MC20, will give
will give you 600mm f5.6 eqv reach

Anyways, hope that helps. And happy decision making.
Thank you, Joe!
All of that helps, especially what I left above.
Humbled to say, I could always improve regarding exposure (makes me a better photographer too!) Just checked my local library and they have it (so I placed a hold on it).
I didn't know about the MC20 extending the reach of a lens; I knew it was for macro; I just didn't think of its other possibilities :)
Thank you, again, for the really helpful info!
Annie
 

Annie

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Thank you so much for that link! I didn't know about this used camera site. I like that sometimes the manuals are included (have not seen on other sites), they show extensive photos of the gear, and (my fave) they have the shutter actuations.
I might be OK with used M1 II if shutter count is low and the camera is in mint/excellent+ condition.
I am hoping to get to do Test and Wow first and see how the cameras (M5 III and M1 II feel with the 40-150 lens).
All the best!
Annie
 

ac12

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That is a pain to have the battery die :( I find that happening with my little Sony cybershot camera, but I never had to worry with my Canon SL1. One thing I would definitely miss leaving DSLR.
Mirrorless cameras just uses more power than a dSLR. My dSLRs will run the entire weekend + Monday on a single charge.
My experience is that battery life is based on "power ON" time, not so much the number of shots.
  • I drained an EM1-mk2 battery in about 3-1/2 hours and shot about 350 pics.
  • And I shot over 1,000 pics in less than 2 hours and still had lots of battery life left.
The lens you use also affect battery drain.
My EM1-mk1 with the Panasonic-Lumix 12-60 will go 4 hours, continuous ON. But with the Olympus 12-100, it plummets to 2-1/2 hours. It is for the 12-100 lens that I have FIVE batteries for my mk1.
With that many batteries you also have to consider how to charge them.​
On vacation, I took three batteries (should have taken four), with two chargers, and charged every evening/night in two shifts.​
The cost of four additional batteries + 2 additional chargers is a significant cost.​
The mk1 uses a similar capacity battery to the EM5-mk3, so if you use the 12-100 continuously, you can expect a similar 2-1/2 hours of battery run time.
 
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Annie

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The mk1 uses a similar capacity battery to the EM5-mk3, so if you use the 12-100 continuously, you can expect a similar 2-1/2 hours of battery run time.
Thank you!
That's important to know. I turn the camera off when not actually taking a photo so I am grateful for that habit.
I don't need the 12-100; thus far the 14-150 sounds like a better option (it is the kit lens currently selling with the camera).
All the best,
 

ac12

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Thank you!
That's important to know. I turn the camera off when not actually taking a photo so I am grateful for that habit.
I don't need the 12-100; thus far the 14-150 sounds like a better option (it is the kit lens currently selling with the camera).
All the best,
I shoot sports, so there are very few times when I can turn the camera OFF.
Maybe between games and halftime, if there is no activity happening to also shoot.
 

Annie

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I shoot sports, so there are very few times when I can turn the camera OFF.
That makes sense. I attend sporting events. For the inside ones, I am unsure if I could bring my camera so I don't consider it. I do love watching :)
 

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I've used KEH and MPB very often. Always a good experience. I traded in a Canon M3 towards my Olympus EM5 with MPB. Their communication and assistance in the UK is second to none.
 

RAH

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This is all very helpful. I haven't had Exposure Comp experience but it sounds like something that would be helpful... you can see I have much still to learn!
That is a pain to have the battery die :( I find that happening with my little Sony cybershot camera, but I never had to worry with my Canon SL1. One thing I would definitely miss leaving DSLR.
All the best, Annie
PS: Love the image!! <3
Exposure Comp is mainly used when you use Aperture or Shutter priority. It is pretty much a REQUIREMENT when you use these modes because otherwise you have no way to tweak the exposure yourself (those modes set the shutter or aperture respectively). It is no big deal. For example, if you are shooting a black cat in a snow bank, you might want to adjust the exposure the camera is giving you.

Actually, I find using Exposure comp EASIER than changing the shutter speed or aperture in manual mode because Exp comp is more intuituve and obvious - you use plus to get more light, minus to get less light - not much thought behind that! In fact, I think that is why many manufacturers are allowing Exp comp to be active even in manual mode, because people are so used to using it and it is more intuitive. Obviously, it isn't necessary in manual mode (which is why it has always been disabled in manual mode up till recently), but it's a lot easier to use a plus or minus button than thinking about what you need to do with the shutter speed to boost the exposure for example (i.e. lower it).

I don't find the E-M5III (or E-M10II) much worse battery-wise than the SL1. I agree that a DSLR potentially uses less power because of the optical viewfinder, but all of these cameras seem to give about 250 pics on one battery charge, at least for me. A DSLR like my Canon 80D gives about 1200 to 1500, which is why you pay the big bucks for it and its larger battery (or the E-M1II or III with its larger battery).
 

Annie

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Exposure Comp is mainly used when you use Aperture or Shutter priority.
Actually, I find using Exposure comp EASIER than changing the shutter speed or aperture in manual mode
Thank you,
Yes, I am usually completely in manual mode, setting aperture, ISO, and shutter speed.
I use the exposure meter within the camera to adjust exposure. It does require more thinking on me part (or taking a photo and reviewing it in the LCD display), but after awhile I get good at guessing what I need.

With the SL1 I could not use the exposure compensation functionality in complete manual mode: one day a few months ago, I decided to try it to see what it was, not realizing it is the same thing as I do manually when I adjust settings using the exposure meter.

I will try it!
 

ac12

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Thank you,
Yes, I am usually completely in manual mode, setting aperture, ISO, and shutter speed.
I use the exposure meter within the camera to adjust exposure. It does require more thinking on me part (or taking a photo and reviewing it in the LCD display), but after awhile I get good at guessing what I need.

With the SL1 I could not use the exposure compensation functionality in complete manual mode: one day a few months ago, I decided to try it to see what it was, not realizing it is the same thing as I do manually when I adjust settings using the exposure meter.

I will try it!
Don't overlook the PSA modes.
I can shoot M when I need to, but P is easier and S and A get used when appropriate.
When the light is changing, I find the auto modes easier than constantly adjusting the exposure manually.
PSAM are simply tools, use the appropriate mode for the shoot.
 

RAH

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I agree with what @ac12 says. I see little point in using manual mode and then adjusting your camera to get what it would give you anyway if you used Aperture or Shutter priority. With Exposure Compensation, you have full ability to tweak the exposure any way you like. I usaully use Aperture priority because there is essentially no danger of getting a bad exposure, whereas wiht Shutter Priority you run the danger of easily exceeding the ability of your lens (to open wide enough to give enough light for the shutter speed you set). You can get aroundt his problem in Shutter mode by using Auto ISO (with a limit you can set), but that has its own set of problems, IMHO. I actually think most photographers use Aperture mode.

I DO use manual mode when necessary under special conditions, but only when required. Especially when you are on vacation and shooting a lot of images sightseeing, for example, there's no point in constantly adjusting your camera, IMHO.
 

Taz trooper

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As a bit of history I started ~40 years ago with an OM-10 to learn my craft, and then about 13 years ago moved into digital with a Four-Thirds E510.
In 2015 I got a very good deal on a Panasonic GF6 and dropped into micro four thirds.
MFT has inspired me to do a lot more - I got a 9mm Body cap lens straight away, and MFT-OM adapter to start using some of my old manual OM 35mm lens.
Since then I've bought a E-PL3, and 45-200mm zoom, and the whole beauty of the system is the weight and size - I used to carry too much, and i can now have fish-eye to 400mm equivalent telephoto in a tiny bag that's suited for business travel.

I have treated myself to a OM-D EM10 with 45mm f1.8 a couple of weeks ago, and haven't really had a decent use of it yet, so the EPL3 will be semi-retired to car camera. (The E510 is currently being pressed into Infra-red service)

- Were you more satisfied than frustrated in the first few months to 6 months of using the camera?
No, as long as you turn on Super Control panel (SCP) it's easy to get to anything.
I found Panasonic a bit less straightforward, but SCP has been about for ~15 years+
Do a Richard Wong 'tune' of the set-up

- Did you find it easy to advance your skills with the camera, using manuals, this forum, etc.?
There's plenty of advise and experts in every area, especially things like macro. Othwerwise there's good stuff (mostly) on YouTube. Manuals are quite clear .
Get an adaptor, and slow down and use some vintage 35mm lens. You might not pixel peep, but you'll get some interesting bokeh and effects.

- Would you do it again (purchase the same camera and lens)?
Yes. Size and weight are important. My 'light kit' is a 15x10x7 pouch on the waist strap on my daysack (note that's centimeters and not inches)...
My company's all staff photo, printed at A2 is shot on Micro 4/3 (on the Panasonic) - it's good enough!
 

Carbonman

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less intuitive though
I remember reading an article on software by someone that had been developing and using computer programs since the 1960s. He commented that there was no such thing as "intuitive" software; it had to have a lot of similarities or comparison points to a piece of software you had learned to navigate. When training users on card access system management, photo ID, CCTV VMS systems and the like, I've always kept this comment in mind. If the new user has no experience or familiarity to hang their new learning on, there's no way using the software, tool or other item/process is "intuitive".
 

relic

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Thank you, Joe!
All of that helps, especially what I left above.
Humbled to say, I could always improve regarding exposure (makes me a better photographer too!) Just checked my local library and they have it (so I placed a hold on it).
I didn't know about the MC20 extending the reach of a lens; I knew it was for macro; I just didn't think of its other possibilities :)
Thank you, again, for the really helpful info!
Annie
I just want to say (in case it isn't clear) that the MC20 can only be used with a very few specific lenses (not sure which ones as I don't have it nor the lenses that go with it).
 

ac12

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I remember reading an article on software by someone that had been developing and using computer programs since the 1960s. He commented that there was no such thing as "intuitive" software; it had to have a lot of similarities or comparison points to a piece of software you had learned to navigate. When training users on card access system management, photo ID, CCTV VMS systems and the like, I've always kept this comment in mind. If the new user has no experience or familiarity to hang their new learning on, there's no way using the software, tool or other item/process is "intuitive".
That sounds like me, the first time I used a Mac.
I was totally lost.
 
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Annie

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Annie

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Get an adaptor, and slow down and use some vintage 35mm lens. You might not pixel peep, but you'll get some interesting bokeh and effects.
Thank you, Taz,
That was helpful -- and good to know on the Super Control Panel!

I was curious on the above statement. What are you referencing specifically?
I randomly googled "Olympus 35 mm" and selected this one that actually seems very good as it is a macro
(but I do not understand the "ED" reference):
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/used...MIxIOp3JjG6QIVzcDACh2-rgHREAQYAyABEgJt1_D_BwE

If I get the Oly E-M, I think I might actually like it if it is easy to work with ! :)
Thank you, again!!
Annie
 

wimg

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Thank you, Taz,
That was helpful -- and good to know on the Super Control Panel!

I was curious on the above statement. What are you referencing specifically?
I randomly googled "Olympus 35 mm" and selected this one that actually seems very good as it is a macro
(but I do not understand the "ED" reference):
https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/used...MIxIOp3JjG6QIVzcDACh2-rgHREAQYAyABEgJt1_D_BwE

If I get the Oly E-M, I think I might actually like it if it is easy to work with ! :)
Thank you, again!!
Annie
Hi Annie,

ED means it has an extra low dispersion element for better colour correction. This is a FT lens, however, so you will need an adapter to use it, although you will still have AF, be it a bit slower than with MFT lenses. The adapter you obviously could use with other FT lenses as well.

The SCP does make it easy to work the camera, you would not have to get into the menus except fro very special or selective stuff.

Kind regards, Wim
 

Taz trooper

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Hi Annie,

ED means it has an extra low dispersion element for better colour correction. This is a FT lens, however, so you will need an adapter to use it, although you will still have AF, be it a bit slower than with MFT lenses. The adapter you obviously could use with other FT lenses as well.

The SCP does make it easy to work the camera, you would not have to get into the menus except fro very special or selective stuff.

Kind regards, Wim
Annie and Wimg,

The lens you gave a link to is as Wimg says a Four-Thirds lens, so needs a M4/3 to 4/3 adaptor.
I have the exact same lens at work for use on my GX85. It's a very good lens, very sharp, capable of 1:1 life size macro; but is painfully slow to autofocus on M4/3.
At home I have the old OM 50mm f3.5, fully manual and again sharp.
Note that you can experiment with a pair of auto extension tubes (usually 10/16mm) for M4/3, and try with existing lens - I've had some very good snail shots on my GF6 with extension tubes.
 

RAH

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I also have the old 35mm 4/3 lens. It's fine and that price at B&H is OK, but a new m43 30mm lens is only about $225 and is better, IMHO. You'd have to buy an adapter for the 4/3 lens (and I've had bad lucky with a B&H brand one, so a more expensive Oly or Pany version would be advisable - more bucks!). Plus, generally speaking, I think that dedicated m43 lenses are better than fooling around with those old 4/3 lenses from the Oly DSLR days. IMHO.
 
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