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looking to test out legacy lenses on my new g2

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by steini, Sep 27, 2010.

  1. steini

    steini New to Mu-43

    3
    Sep 23, 2010
    Madison, WI
    Hi, I just bought a g2 and am considering buying a legacy lens or two. I saw in a local repair shop some inexpensive lenses but don't know what to buy and what adapter I would need.

    I am wondering if anyone has advice on the following lenses.

    Olympus zukio 50mm f1.4
    Sigma 100-3-- four simga auto focus
    cpc 28 mm f2.8 for minolta md.

    These wer all priced between $25-$90.

    since I am new to this and looking for experience i would be grateful for any advice.

    Greg
     
  2. deirdre

    deirdre Mu-43 Top Veteran

    661
    Aug 9, 2010
    You won't get autofocus with any Sigma lenses (or any legacy lenses).

    I started with this page, and thus I bought a couple of lenses he used, specifically the Canon FD 50mm f/1.4 (one of the best lenses ever). KEH has a few of them. (There are others of that specific lens in various eras I didn't link to....)

    You can do it two ways: stick with one mount to minimize number of adaptors, or just go for "best of class" in each. The adapted lenses section will have descriptions and pictures.

    Here's one I took with the above-mentioned Canon.


    UCSC Arboretum 8/22: - 18 by Deirdre Saoirse Moen, on Flickr
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    I just did the same thing

    I started off with Olympus lenses (seemed like a natural to go with my EPL-1) but I tried a few others and found I preferred the look of old Konica Hexanon and Pentax Super Takumar lenses (but that is purely subjective). You can find m43 to what-have-you adapters on eBay with decent ones running around $30. I buy from a group called rainbowimaging and have been pleased with the service and quality.

    The adapter you buy depends entirely on the brand of lenses you buy. I would suggest trying one and see if you even like using MF lenses. Which type you buy could be as easy as who has what lens for sale at a good price. Remember that the multiplier of m43 cameras is 2x so the focal length on the lens is effectively doubled on camera. That means that Olympus 50/1.4 is really a 100/1.4. Each lens will have its own unique characteristics and a visit to the adapted lens sample archive will let you look at a lot of samples and see what you like.

    Adapted Lens Sample Image Archive - Micro Four Thirds User Forum

    If I were to suggest a lens to start with I would say keep it cheap until you get a feel for what you like. The Olympus 50/1.8 (OM mount), Super Takuamr 55/1.8 (m42 mount) and Konica 50/1.7 (AR mount) are all cheap, sharp and plentiful.

    Kevin
     
  4. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    greg

    really depends on what kind of photos you want to take - but my experience, working hand held with an E-P1, then anything over 135mm is going to be tricky to handle - especially without image stabilisation.

    28mm is probably as wide as you want to go, though I have had good results from a OM 24/2 - and so so results from a Nikkor 24/2.

    All that said there is plenty of choice out there - and you will discover that each lens will have its own character.

    I have a flickr set of my experiences here - it might give you some pointers - some are with expensive Leica and zeiss lenses - but others are with other lenses that cost me between 50 and 200 euros

    Legacy lenses - a set on Flickr

    happy to answer any questions

    cheers

    Kevin
     
  5. Ulfric M Douglas

    Ulfric M Douglas Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 6, 2010
    Northumberland
    Just looking at that list I can say you'll probably be happy with the Zuiko 50mm as the most useful lens there : it does stuff your native m4/3rds lenses don't do. I hope its cheap enough.

    First thing I recommend is getting a <$10 50mm f1.8-ish (pentax, OM, whatever), buying a <$20 adapter from e-bay and just using it at wide aperture for a while.
    Most 'bang for your buck' until you decide if manual lenses are your thing.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. deirdre

    deirdre Mu-43 Top Veteran

    661
    Aug 9, 2010
    Having just tried to hold a 200mm lens at 1/30 sec shot -- I completely agree. Then again, the EPL-1 is on its way, but I don't think even IBIS could have saved those shots, only a monopod or tripod.
     
  7. kevinparis

    kevinparis Cantankerous Scotsman

    Feb 12, 2010
    Gent, Belgium
    yeah thats always going to be tricky :)

    the old rule of thumb is that the lowest shutter speed you can hand hold is 1/focal length.

    in old 35 mm film days that would mean if you were shooting with a 200mm lens then you should be shooting at 1/200 or 1/250 of a second.

    Of course with the doubling effect on 4/3 you probably want to also double that rule of thumb - so the same 200mm lens on a 4/3 behaves more like a 400mm lens so you will probably want to shoot at 1/400.

    of course rules are there to be broken - but this one kinda holds up

    cheers

    K
     
  8. brnmatsumoto

    brnmatsumoto Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Jul 18, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    Hi:

    Welcome to the club. I thought I'd write about the Adapters. First, there seems to be two routes to go. One is to go the eBay route and find the adapters that are sold at very reasonable prices there. Most buyers seems to have good luck with those and I have one for a Nikon F mount lens to a Panasonic Micro Four Thirds body. It work. My only complaint was its lens release was "sticky" and there were times the pin, locking the lens in the mount, would not drop down. It seemed to lock--and the lens release button would take some jiggling to get it to release. Could never figure out why this happened. In any case, taking the adapter off was an annoyance and I just quit using it.

    The other route is to go toward the higher end adapters that run about $200. You can see these on the web site of

    CameraQuest Home Page

    Now these are much more expensive--but, I do a lot of this work switching between my Nikon lenses between the Panasonic and the Nikon body, so I sprung for one of these mounts. No troubles--but then you are talking about an adapter that costs 10X more. I might also add, I have been mounting my Panasonic on microscopes and telescopes and I wanted the assurance that the mount did not introduce any cant--I wanted the sensor to be perfectly perpendicular to the optical axis of the microscope.

    My suggestion, if you go the eBay route, make sure the seller has an excellent reputation for selling a good product that they back up. If you will be using the adapter a lot, then maybe it will be worth the money to go to the mounts sold by Cameraquest. Oh yes, Novoflex makes these adapters. They are also expensive at about $200 each.

    Which to buy? Well, I actually recommend most people to try the eBay route and just be careful when using these adapters. They certainly give a lot of bang for the buck and the majority of them seem to get the job done.

    Brian
     
  9. deirdre

    deirdre Mu-43 Top Veteran

    661
    Aug 9, 2010
    Back when I was younger with steadier hands, I could bend the rule by a factor of 3 if I was willing to burn a couple extra frames of film. These days, not even 50 will save me.

    The other day, though, I was just playing with a lens in the yard. No critical shots lost.
     
  10. panystac

    panystac Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Sep 14, 2010
    Tokyo, Japan
    Other VERY GOOD lenses which are dirt cheap are the old Minolta MC & MD Rokkor lenses.

    I have many legacy lenses, and these are some of the best.
    e.g
    Minolta MC Rokkor 58mm F1.4 (very nice)
    Minolta MC Rokkor 50mm F1.4
    Minolta MC Rokkor 135mm F2.8
    Minolta MC Rokkor 200mm F3.5
    Minolta MD Rokkor 50mm F1.4
    Minolta MD Rokkor 85mm F2 (this is one of my sharpest lenses)
    Minolta MD Rokkor 135mm F2.8

    Others
    Olympus OM 50 F1.4
    Olympus OM 50 F1.8 (very cheap, very sharp in the centre, high contrast)

    Konica Hexanon 50mm F1.7 (very sharp)
    Konica Hexanon 57mm F1.4

    Canon FD 50mm F1.4 SSC (one of my best)
    Canon FL 58mm F1.2 (not the sharpest around!!)

    Pentax Takumar 50mm F1.4 SMC
    Pentax 50mm F1.4 Super Takumar
    Pentax Takumar 55mm F1.8 SMC
    Pentax Takumar 200mm F3.5 SMC

    Nikon Ais 50mm F1.4
    Nikon E-series 100mm F2.8

    Tamon SP 90mm F2.5 (very sharp)

    Tokina AT-X 80-200mm F2.8
    Tokina AT-X 100-300mm F4

    And others!!!!
     
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  11. photoSmart42

    photoSmart42 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    628
    Feb 12, 2010
    San Diego, CA
    Whatever legacy lens you buy, make sure it has an adjustable aperture ring in addition to the adjustable focus ring. You won't be able to adjust the aperture electronically through your camera unless it's a lens made for either m4/3 or 4/3.
     
  12. steini

    steini New to Mu-43

    3
    Sep 23, 2010
    Madison, WI
    Thanks so much. This is a great help. I am going to keep reading these threads abit. I think they are super helpful and likely buy a lens and adapter in the coming weeks.

    I was totally puzzled by the adapters and lenses so this really helps.

    I am loving the camera and can't wait to do some more experimenting.

    Thanks,

    Greg
     
  13. brnmatsumoto

    brnmatsumoto Mu-43 Regular

    92
    Jul 18, 2010
    Los Angeles, CA
    You might enjoy this web site:

    biofos.com: contents of the site - site map

    It is the index for a site that talks about Olympus digital equipment and the author has shot a lot of legacy lenses on the four thirds body. It might be worthwhile to check some of his observations. Although not dealing specifically with the micro four thirds system--his observations and notes are a fun read.

    Brian
     
  14. panystac

    panystac Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Sep 14, 2010
    Tokyo, Japan
    However, if you have an AF-S Nikon or Pentax K (DA) lens without an adjustable aperture ring, you can buy an adapter to micro4/3 that will open/close the aperture using the aperture lever.
     
  15. photoSmart42

    photoSmart42 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    628
    Feb 12, 2010
    San Diego, CA
    True, but that's a bit advanced for someone just starting to play around with adapters.
     
  16. panystac

    panystac Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Sep 14, 2010
    Tokyo, Japan

    True enough!!!!:biggrin: