Looking for a zoom lens for my E-P3

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by rajeshr, Nov 26, 2011.

  1. rajeshr

    rajeshr Mu-43 Regular

    33
    Sep 26, 2011
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    I have an E-P3 along with the Olympus 14-42mm kit lens and 45mm 1.8 lens. I've been thinking of adding the Lumix G X 45-175mm lens to my collection, but there seems to quite a bit of negative feedback for that lens.

    Is anyone using that lens with an E-P3 have any feedback? If not, what would be a good alternative? Would either the Panny 14-140 or Oly 14-150 be a better choice than the G X or the Panny 45-200 or the Oly 40-150mm lenses?

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Persnally... if you already have agood 45mm prime and zoom, I would step up to a more specialized super-telephoto for the next lens, like saY the Lumix 100-300mm, or the m.Zuiko 75-300mm.
    Why stay so close to what you already have?
     
  3. rajeshr

    rajeshr Mu-43 Regular

    33
    Sep 26, 2011
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Thanks, but I should have mentioned I was looking for a good travel zoom. The ones you mention may be too big to travel comfortably with as well as the fact that they won't cover me from ~42mm to 75/100mm.

    Should I stay with two lenses (one for 14-45 and one for 45-175/200) or pick up one that covers 14-150?

    Thanks!
     
  4. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    Do you really need to cover every mm? As much as I dislike Ken Rockwell, his piece about assembling a system is a cult classic. I think everybody deserves to read it.

    Assembling a System
     
  5. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yes, this is exactly what I'm talking about. :) If we had to have every mm of focal length covered, then how did we ever get by with prime lenses for so many decades? We didn't have 150 different lenses to cover a 50-200mm range, we carried two lenses - a 50mm and a 200mm. One focal length to cover a natural type of view, and another focal length to cover a tighter field of view.

    Why would you want something to cover the 45mm to 75mm range for instance, when in a fraction of the time it takes to swap a lens you could have changed your field of view from 45mm to 75mm using your feet - many times over? Why do you need two lenses which can both get near 50mm?

    That's why I say not to get a lens so close to what you already have. If you're going for a two-lens setup, then get something which will give you a whole new range of capabilities rather than overlapping each other. Replacing what you have with a superzoom however, is another question altogether.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  6. WT21

    WT21 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 19, 2010
    Boston
    A great travel kit is the 14-150 plus the 20mm 1.7

    Sent from my iPhone using Mu-43 App
     
    • Like Like x 1
  7. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yup, or in the OP's case he already has the 45mm/1.8. So if he goes with the 14-150mm he could have that to cover the focal lengths, and the 45mm for the "fast lens".
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. rajeshr

    rajeshr Mu-43 Regular

    33
    Sep 26, 2011
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Ned et al,

    Thanks for the feedback. It is much appreciated. You've given me a lot to think about.

    I'm leaning towards buying the superzoom and taking it and the 45mm on my trip. That way I can give the new lens a good shakedown and return it if I don't like it.
     
  9. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    I think the 14-150 is a great choice, especially for travel.
     
  10. Ray Sachs

    Ray Sachs Super Moderator

    Apr 17, 2010
    Near Philadephila
    To ME, the ultimate travel kit is the 14-150 for most stuff, the 9-18 for walking around in tight urban spaces, and something faster for low light. I'd probably go with the 12 f2 because I always prefer wide angle, but the 20 1.7 or 25 1.4 are really good options. The 45 is more of a specialty portrait lens, so I might take that ALSO, but I wouldn't rely on that as an only fast option. If you don't care about super wide angle, the 14-150 and one faster lens should work nicely. There's really only one good superzoom option (well, there's the Pany 14-140, but its a tank, and if you have an Olympus camera and aren't doing tons of video, you're probably better with the smaller/lighter Oly version). There are a few good options for low light. Only you can decide which suits you best.

    -Ray