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Long Exposures Question...

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by cfugle, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. cfugle

    cfugle Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Sep 11, 2013
    Quebec
    Christopher
    Good day 43ers,

    I have now got a decent hang of my Oly E-PM2 and am loving the touch screen shutter feature for pinpoint focus for macro shots. Don't know how I lived without it:thumbup:.
    I have a question regarding shooting night skies.
    I want to capture a wide expansive night sky (pitch black with thousands of pinpoint stars). How can I achieve this properly using a tripod? I have e-bay'd a remote cable release which will arrive in a few weeks and I just picked up the wide converter lens for the 14-42mm kit lens (which by the way is surprising me on it's sharpness).

    I feel a little lost trying to estimate shutter speeds. And if I may ask, should I turn off noise reduction for the raw files as the shot to shot times are longer than the exposures. I gather the cpu is pushed to its max during these types of shots.:mad:

    Many thanks for all your informative feedback:drinks:...
     
  2. mr_botak

    mr_botak Mu-43 Veteran

    222
    Dec 4, 2011
    Reading, UK
    David
    I'd use the self timer to fire the shutter, probably a 10 second delay. Turn IS off. Fix ISO at 200. Perhaps start with a 10 or 15 second exposure @ f5.6 which is probably where the lens is at its best and go from there. Try with the noise reduction on and off, I suspect you'll be better off with it on.
     
  3. Pili

    Pili Mu-43 Veteran

    224
    Jul 16, 2012
    Boulder, CO
    Alex
    ISO 200 is going to produce the cleanest files, but your probably going to have to boost the ISO and open the aperture as wide as possible to prevent star trails. Check out the "Rule of 600" for more info.
     
  4. arad85

    arad85 Mu-43 Veteran

    477
    Aug 16, 2012
    So.. when you've tried that and just got near enough nothing on the photo, try upping the ISO, lengthening the exposure (30 secs) and getting a faster lens :wink: Dark skies (away froma city ) really helps too.

    Depending on how far you are pointed away from the poles, will depend how big the start trails are. The earth rotates, thus the stars appear to move across the skies. You're likely to be limited to ~30 secs max exposure.
     
  5. cfugle

    cfugle Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Sep 11, 2013
    Quebec
    Christopher
  6. cfugle

    cfugle Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Sep 11, 2013
    Quebec
    Christopher
    Follow up...

    In terms of lenses I only have the kit lens for M43's but I own Pentax Takumar 50mm 1.4 and 55mm F1.8, as well as a Tamron Macro 90mm 2.8 that very sharp. Which of these would be recommended as I have adapters for them?

    Thanks again
     
  7. Pili

    Pili Mu-43 Veteran

    224
    Jul 16, 2012
    Boulder, CO
    Alex
    While the adapted lenses are faster, you'll want to stick with the 14mm end of the kit lens (unless you want to invest in a tracking system of course :p ) The narrow field of view will accentuate star movement. I'd start with 14mm, ƒ3.5, iso 1600+ and adjust the shutter speed to exposure to your liking. Shoot in RAW and try reducing the noise in post. A noisy shot is better than no shot, but you can easily get usable files up to 3200, and 6400 is reasonable if your viewing at mostly web resolutions.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    To avoid star tails, you'll need to follow the rule of 600.
    600 / (lens focal length as marked on the lens X format crop factor).
    Example using mZuiko 9-18 zoom at 9mm: 600 / (9 X 2) = 33 sec. slowest shutter speed.
    You will have to determine the ISO according to the aperture you select. Notice the longer the lens focal length, a faster shutter speed is required.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. norseman1968

    norseman1968 Mu-43 Regular

    85
    Jan 31, 2013
    Norway
    I would recommend Olympus 12mm F2 for night photography. Use high iso 1600-6400. Noise reduction on. Shoot in raw. Away from any light pollution.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. skywarka

    skywarka New to Mu-43

    9
    Aug 16, 2013
    Perth West Oz
    Tony
    Dark skies bright lens wide

    Its relatively easy to get an average shot. A good one takes a bit more effort including post processing.

    This one (my first effort after reading up) was taken in moderately dark skies just put the EM-5 on a tripod with the 12-50 zoom wide open f3.5 at 12mm - 15s at iso 800. A brighter lens will allow longer exposure in darker skies.

    I just used 2s delay on shutter. Also used the manual focus at 7x to focus on two bright stars (the Pointers here down under).

    Noise reduction for long exposures set to ON.

    I think thats about it - dark skies and bright lens can get really good shots. I think the guys who do really good shots do stacking of several exposures.
     

    Attached Files:

    • Like Like x 1
  11. Just Jim

    Just Jim Mu-43 Top Veteran

    941
    Oct 20, 2011
    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/104099782@N02/10069193206/" title="untitled-7.jpg by JamesGunning, on Flickr"> 10069193206_f8400718a6. "281" height="500" alt="untitled-7.jpg"></a>

    Here's a 30 second exposure at 5.0 is 1250 or so. manual focus to a touch less than infinity I always keep camera NR off it takes forever, and used Nik's NR, and popped it with Adobe's shake reduction on auto, lazy I know, I'm sure it can be better tuned with it manually.
     
  12. cfugle

    cfugle Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Sep 11, 2013
    Quebec
    Christopher
    Demi-Moon

    So I followed the 600 rule and found that for stars it is a great rule to guide exposure, but this fall half moon was so bright that I had to reduce the shutter speed to 1/160th of a second, f6.3, 40-15mm at 150mm (equiv 300mm). The shot is cropped heavily and only slightly sharpened.
     

    Attached Files:

  13. kinlau

    kinlau Mu-43 Top Veteran

    836
    Feb 29, 2012
    The moon is basically an object sitting in full sun, so it's mostly sunny 16 unless most of the moon is in shadow.
     
  14. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    Have you tried experimenting with Live Bulb yet? No need for estimation as the screen gets updated (up to 24 times) during the exposure.