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Lenstip review of Panasonic 14mm

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by Djarum, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    Thanks, Dj. I think that in their conclusion, they ought to mention again that the distortion and vignetting shown are significantly addressed by the corrections built into the JPEG engine of all MFT cameras as well as the most commonly used RAW converters.
     
  2. Narnian

    Narnian Nobody in particular ...

    Aug 6, 2010
    Midlothian, VA
    Richard Elliott
    Do you think lens makers are going to get sloppy in lens design knowing distortion can be corrected in-camera and during post-processing?
     
  3. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    There's a thread over on the other site discussing the issue now.

    Andy Westlake I believe did some tests and the angular field of view is 74.7 degrees after software correction, which means the lens is closer to 28.8mm (35mm eq)

    The 14mm's measured angle of view - 74 degrees at 2m, or 28mm-equiv.: Micro Four Thirds Talk Forum: Digital Photography Review
     
  4. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    In my own personal opinion, quality optics, regardless of the medium, always has a premium. As long as I'm not paying for that same premium for a software corrected lens, I have no problem with it.
     
  5. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    I don't think they'll be sloppy, but they will increasingly trade optical quality for smaller size, lighter weight, and lower cost if the software corrections produce results that are good enough.

    As Dj said, optically excellent lenses will continue to co-exist and demand a premium. For example, a Panasonic rep implied that part of the reason the Leica 45/2.8 was costly was that Leica was unwilling to approve a design which utilized a lot of software correction. This was interesting, because Leica clearly approves the software approach for a range of small sensor Panasonic cameras with Leica-branded lenses (eg, LX5).
     
  6. Djarum

    Djarum Super Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    Huntsville, AL, USA
    Jason
    I really believe this is why there hasn't been a HG or SHG line from Olympus. Pre-mFT, the only thing was to create really good glass.
     
  7. Jerry_R

    Jerry_R Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 26, 2010
    Why so far? Lecia 25mm f/1.4 is also corrected (chromatic aberration).
     
  8. Jerry_R

    Jerry_R Mu-43 Regular

    38
    Jun 26, 2010
    I still hope there will appear SHG class - u43 lenses.
     
  9. Amin Sabet

    Amin Sabet Administrator

    Apr 10, 2009
    Boston, MA (USA)
    I don't have the exact quote handy, but it suggested that Leica was unwilling to go as far as Panasonic with regards to software correction for the 45/2.8 macro (eg, marked distortion correction). It didn't say they were unwilling to use software correction.
     
  10. Narnian

    Narnian Nobody in particular ...

    Aug 6, 2010
    Midlothian, VA
    Richard Elliott
    I can see where Leica would view the MFT camera line as premium versus the point and shoots and hence compromise on m4/3 lenses might sully their reputation.

    Even then they are bargains when compared to their M and R mount lenses.
     
  11. Linh

    Linh Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 14, 2009
    Maryland, US
    I would say lazy, not sloppy. Unfortunately, I see them trying to maximize software correction before maximizing glass. Especially in more consumer driven products.

    Hopefully they will keep a good balance, maybe have a full "Lecia" range for their upper end lenses. Though, I hope they make their own, I don't want to pay for the Leica name, heh.
     
  12. drpump

    drpump Mu-43 Regular

    154
    Oct 28, 2010
    +1. I think this is the key. If software correction means good images from a less expensive lens, then I'm in favour. At $400, I think the Panasonic is pushing their luck with the 14mm. But perhaps I underestimate the cost of producing a wide angle lens.