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Lens related questions

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by quinlan, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. quinlan

    quinlan New to Mu-43

    9
    Jul 31, 2011
    Hello all -
    I recently bought a GH2 and have several old Nikkor primes, namely:
    - a 200mm 4.0
    - a 105mm 2.5
    - a 55mm 3.5
    - a 35mm 2.5
    - a 28mm 3.5
    - a 20mm 4.0

    Being what you might call a rookie, I've posted a couple questions on this forum already and I still need your advice.

    My first question is can you effectively use a 200mm on a m4/3 camera? Wouldn't that become a super-tele lens on the GH2?

    Next is, why do you need such big aperture as is recommended by most 'experts' on the web? Is it just for the purpose of low light shooting? Because the primes I have got aren't super fast as you can see.

    I'd also like to know what lenses are typically needed for movie work?

    And now my big question: I'd like a wider lens and I'm not sure which to choose. Options I dug up so far are:
    -the very expensive new Olympus Zuiko 12mm 2.0
    -the Sigma 14mm 2.8
    -the Samyang/Rokinon 14mm 2.8
    -the Panasonic 7-14mm zoom 4.0
    -the way cheaper Panny 14mm 2.5

    What would you choose? And also one last thing, seeing that I have a Nikon 20mm 4.0, would there be any advantage in getting the Panasonic 20mm 1.7?

    Thank you for reading.
     
  2. spatulaboy

    spatulaboy I'm not really here

    Jul 13, 2011
    North Carolina
    Vin
    Yep, our sensors have a 2x crop factor, so your 200mm effectively becomes a 400mm. :)

    Large apertures are desirable for many reasons for many people. For me, it is important because it allows me to shoot with higher shutter speeds. This helps reduce blurry images due to camera shake, since our Panasonic bodies do not have built in image stabilization when using legacy lenses.

    As for movies, I don't know too much about it. I tried it with a few of my legacy lenses, they looked pretty good.
     
  3. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    A 200mm lens is indeed a super-tele, but that is perfectly effective to use. One of my most used lenses on my E-PL2 is the Zuiko 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5. Being a faster lens though, allows much easier telephoto use. One lens I couldn't get along with on my DSLR was the Zuiko 40-150mm f/4-5.6, which was so slow for that focal length that it was jumping everywhere. I never had that problem with the longer Zuiko 50-200mm f/2.8-3.5, because of both the larger aperture as well as the larger size and weight (for better stability). The Zuiko 70-300mm f/4-5.6 was much longer and only a little faster (for the same focal lengths), but still easier to use than the tiny 40-150mm.
     
  4. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    For movie work, you'll want manual focus and aperture rings. So if you don't mind the size, I'll pick up the Rokinon 14. Lenses don't have to have super high resolution for movies, HD is only 2mp.
     
  5. scarbrd

    scarbrd Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Jul 1, 2011
    Houston, TX
    The 105mm 2.5 Nikkor is a classic! It's probably the favorite lens I've ever owned.

    Should be a beauty with 210mm effective focal length.

    The 55mm is a macro, should also be cool.

    The 200mm F4 was a dog of lens, at least the one I had.

    Never heard of a 35mm 3.5 from Nikon, are you sure it's a Nikon (Nikkor) lens?

    The 20mm F4 is an interesting one, too. The one I owned was a retrofit from the Nikon range finder days. Had to lock the mirror up to use it.I did have a 20mm 2.8 Nikkor.

    My guess is these are all older lenses, but should still be a blast to use on the m4/3.

    Have fun!
     
  6. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    It would be about 2.5 stops faster--great for low light.
    It will be much smaller.
    It will have AF.
    It will most likely be better optically.
     
  7. Hikari

    Hikari Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 26, 2010
    I would go for native m4/3 lenses. A good place to start would the the Panasonic 14mm. It is nice and compact and the price is right.

    The Oly 12mm is indeed a fine lens, but I would get used to the m4/3 system before dropping a whole bunch of money on it.

    If you prefer zooms, then either the Panasonic 7-14 or the Olympus 9-18 would be good choices. The Olympus is less expensive. The zoom lenses are bigger.
     
  8. quinlan

    quinlan New to Mu-43

    9
    Jul 31, 2011
    I'm not sure I want to invest in native lenses. Would they work on APS-C or FF cameras, too? I'm not keen about being stuck to m43 and I like the idea of adapting older lenses.
    Do you think the Rokinon would be a good choice? Is there a sensible difference between 24mm (the 12mm Olympus) and 28mm (the Panasonic or Rokinon 14mm)?

    Scarbrd, you were right, that 35mm Nikkor stops up to 2.8. It's a special lens with a perspective control mechanism.
     
  9. pharaviel

    pharaviel Mu-43 Veteran

    313
    Jun 20, 2011
    Reggio Emilia, Italy
    Daniele Frizzi
    35mm PC nikkor comes both in f2.8 (old) and f2.5 (oldest).
    I have the 2.8 one but didn't tried it yet on m43.

    Sent from my iPhone using Mu-43 App
     
  10. scarbrd

    scarbrd Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Jul 1, 2011
    Houston, TX
    That's an awesome set of Nikon lenses you have there.

    How old are they? Are they AI (Autoindexing)? Multicoated?
     
  11. quinlan

    quinlan New to Mu-43

    9
    Jul 31, 2011
    Most of them are pre AI, except the 20mm and 28mm. I think they are multicoated but I'm not sure. Is there any markings that indicate they are?
     
  12. zettapixel

    zettapixel Mu-43 Veteran

    470
    Aug 12, 2010
    NY
    My guess is because you need a faster lens for a crop sensor to get the same depth of field control as for a full frame camera. But of course you don't necessarily need it.
     
  13. quinlan

    quinlan New to Mu-43

    9
    Jul 31, 2011
    That was my guess also, and I'm not all that crazy about 'bokeh' as some others seem to be. But as Ned pointed out, maybe a faster lens allows to get steadier shots. I don't know as I don't have much experience but that seems like a very valid reason.
     
  14. songs2001

    songs2001 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    693
    Jul 8, 2011
    Faster lenses are also easier to manual and or manual focus as the images snap into place more readily than with slower lenses.
     
  15. scarbrd

    scarbrd Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Jul 1, 2011
    Houston, TX
    Multi-coated Nikon lens will have a blue/green look to the coatings. Non-Multicoated will be primarily blueish in the lens coating.
     
  16. quinlan

    quinlan New to Mu-43

    9
    Jul 31, 2011
    Then I think they are multi-coated but can't be 100% sure.

    Let me just ask again, would native lenses work on APS-C or FF cameras, and do you think there's a real difference between 24mm (Olympus 12mm) and 28mm (or Rokinon 14mm)?
     
  17. scarbrd

    scarbrd Mu-43 Regular

    144
    Jul 1, 2011
    Houston, TX
    The older lenses will work on APS or FF cameras, but since they are older you will not have any of the auto metering functions.

    Without seeing samples from each, I believe the native 12mm will be a better performer than any legacy lens. It's designed for the m4/3 system and for the digital sensors.
     
  18. quinlan

    quinlan New to Mu-43

    9
    Jul 31, 2011
    Thanks, Scarbrd, you've been a real help.

    There's one more thing I need to ask someone who's shot with them, is there a better lens between the Panasonic and the Samyang 14mm?