Lens hood for museums.

Mack

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Some visiting archeologists and I went to a museum of old county buildings that are restored. Some of the exhibits were behind glass and I knew I would get some glare and reflections having done this before that ruined a lot of shots.

Before leaving, I cut up some poster-board so it would fit much like a cone on the 7-14mm f/2.8 lens. Idea was it would block some of the reflections off the glass much like a rubber lens hood did on the Nikons, but that didn't provide enough coverage at times.

I used a 10" dinner plate for the O.D. and a coffee mug lid (3.5" I.D.) as a template. I put some sticky-back Velcro on the back and front edge near the cut in the affair that forms a cone-shape, and it snugs it onto the lens hood both.

The thing actually worked out better than expected when pushed up to the glass window and got rid of the glare and reflections too. I made a mistake of folding it to get it into the bag which I probably shouldn't have. Might be worthwhile to make one out of a rubber sheet or vinyl place-mat maybe.
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Images from behind glass taken with 7-14mm f/2.8 Pro lens on E-M1Mark II.
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Mike Wingate

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Rubber 3 in 1 lenshoods. They tlescope, compress and seal agaist glass, cutting out reflections. Plus you can angle them as they flex. Cheap on eBay.
 

jeffbuzz

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Since it looks like you're using a 7-14mm and there is no front thread-in option I say you did a marvelous job!

The Lee filter holder ($120+) is the only pre-fab thing I have seen that has a flush front which you could push against glass. The NiSi and Haida filter holder wouldn't work for your purpose.

I say paper + velcro = Winner!
 

Carbonman

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Perhaps you could roll the paper into an ice cream cone sort of shape for transport in your camera bag - it wouldn't tend to crease and still store in the same kind of space as a lens.
 

Mack

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Rubber 3 in 1 lenshoods. They telescope, compress and seal against glass, cutting out reflections. Plus you can angle them as they flex. Cheap on eBay.
They don't work on the 7-14mm. No filter thread, and the thing is just too wide for most rubber hoods I tried that will vignette. They might work on something in the >25mm range where you can rock the lens around under the rubber hood like I did with my Nikons (Except the 14-24mm f/2.8 Nikkor as the same thing happens having no filter threads and a bubble of glass in front like the Olympus 7-14mm.

Only thing that is close is this wide dinner-plate cone as the front lens element is almost touching the glass as it is when zoomed out. I used to have to have people stand around to block the reflections along with my jacket.

Aside, I was looking at the Lee setup for the 7-14mm. Seems their adapter is $125, and then add on another $85 for the holder. I already have the 100mm Lee filter setup for the Nikons, but this Olympus 7-14mm lens takes their even larger 150mm size filters which are a huge bit of change. Their 150mm soft grad filter set was around $335 too. Plus, you can't angle it on the glass either.
 
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junkyardsparkle

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Nice DIY! The best stuff I've found for this kind of thing is 1/16" neoprene foam, typically sold as gasket material. It's very supple, which helps both for keeping in a bag and fitting against glass while allowing some variations in angle (it's also the best thing for making a "black foamie thing" flash modifier IMHO). Since I don't have any ultrawide lenses with no threads, though, I generally just use an old rubber "wide angle" hood these days, for convenience reasons. :D
 

pellicle

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They don't work on the 7-14mm. No filter thread, and the thing is just too wide for most rubber hoods I tried that will vignette.
The other problem I've had is the lettering on the nose of the lens sometimes reflects in the glass too ... paint it black?
 

alex g

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You probably know that circular polarizers can be quite good at killing reflections from glass, depending on the relative angle(s) of the light source(s). But there again you need filter threads or a holder, plus you lose a stop or so of light, which usually isn't helpful indoors.

So your cone thing looks like a good solution to me. Plus it could come in handy if you happen to have a small dog that keeps scratching a head wound... :)
 

pellicle

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You probably know that circular polarizers can be quite good at killing reflections from glass,
or even linear polarizers ... which are cheaper and actually make no difference for m43 camers vs circular

However for reflections with the glass at 90deg to the plane (vs at a tangent) they make no difference ... but I assume you also knew that too
 

Mack

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Perhaps you could roll the paper into an ice cream cone sort of shape for transport in your camera bag - it wouldn't tend to crease and still store in the same kind of space as a lens.
Thanks for the idea on the cone! :thumbup:

I tried it once I found some better rubber like material and seems to work well along with a rubber band to make it more packable than me folding up poster-board. So I made another one out of some rubber bed liner stuff which should last better from generic hardware store stuff.
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I went to Lowe's Hardware and found some truck bed liner for $12.98 from which you can make 5-6 of these things. It's about 0.125" thick and easy to cut. Pretty floppy stuff too, but holds shape once on the lens.
https://www.lowes.com/pd/CRAFTSMAN-Truck-Box-Mat/1000615445

Sticky-Back Velcro is there too. Need to scrub it clean with alcohol and let set overnight to stick well. https://www.lowes.com/pd/VELCRO-4-Pack-0-75-in-Black-Fasteners/50323163

I plan to go back to the museum and try this thing out again with the 7-14mm f/2.8 Pro again as the buildings are small so the wide-angle lens helps inside them. Fwiw, most all of the above photos were taken hand-held against the glass using the HDR 1 mode on the E-M1 Mark II. I was surprised that even though it took three shots and stitched them (...Busy..) in camera, that third and long over-exposure HDR 1 shot may have been 6 seconds (I thought it was stuck at times, but just held onto it until it finished and shut off.) but all were still surprisingly sharp.

Friend was shooting with a Fuji XT-2 and having all sorts of issues with exposure, sharpness, and reflections (No IBIS maybe?). Wrong tool for the job perhaps. :whistling:
 

Mike Wingate

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Take care with all this rubber. If you press too hard against the glass, it may form a suction vacuum, and then you are stuck.
 

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