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Lens for video shooting?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by timothysoong, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Well, I recently formed a band. And I used 14-45mm lens on my GF2 for my first video. Outcome not that bad. But I was just wondering which lens would provide better and more satisfying result for video. As I'm stuck with my GF2 as my camcorder is too old to shoot a HD video.

    What do you recommend?

    Most of my shots distance are around the range of 12mm-55mm I guess.

    Thanks
    Tim
     
  2. jerfo

    jerfo Mu-43 Regular

    26
    May 5, 2011
    How is the lighting in your band's recording space? Is it fairly dim? The problem with all of the native :43: zoom lenses is that they are relatively slow and don't perform particularly well in dimly lit rooms. My initial recommendation would be to get a C-Mount adapter and pick up a fast 25mm C-Mount lens and a fast 35mm C-Mount lens: something like this and this. These are US eBay listings, but hopefully you can find something similar and at similarly low prices in Taiwan. Be aware that these lenses will require manual focus and manual aperture control. The manual aperture control is actually a good thing (in my opinion); I don't believe that you can manually control the aperture on native lenses when recording video on the GF2.

    I recorded this video on a G2 using a no-name 25mm c-mount lens: [ame=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTKjRMWK4zQ]Red (King Crimson) - One Man Band Cover Version - YouTube[/ame] (This video is posted elsewhere in the forums, so apologies for re-posting...) I think that the lens cost me less than $30 US, and the adapter was around $10 US. The results are surprisingly sharp, and the depth of field is much more shallow than you'll get with any of the native :43: zoom lenses. If you can't view YouTube videos, let me know and I'll send you a link to download the video file directly.

    The native 20mm f1.7 lens gives very sharp video under dim lighting, but you'll find that it hunts for focus a lot. The result is very distracting. I also find it more difficult to focus manually than the c-mount lenses.

    I hope that this helps! Feel free to post some videos when you have a chance.

    - Jeff
     
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  3. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    You'll find that the more serious video guys often end up using manual focus, along with usually not zooming the lens during shooting, so many people go for adapted lenses for this reason, or at least native primes like the 17mm, 20mm, etc.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    What if I'd use the 20mm f1.7 and turn it into MF mode? Does it work as well as the adapted lens you've mentioned? Sorry I know nothing about adapted lens.

    As for the lightning, it may vary cause my band is more of shooting music videos as in the scene could be anywhere, recording space, outdoors, etc.
     
  5. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Could you give me some recommendations of adapted lens that more serious video guys tend to use?
     
  6. Z-man

    Z-man Mu-43 Regular

    42
    Nov 16, 2011
    how wide do you need?

    One of the reasons I started going with 4/3 format is the video i could do. Right now I am just using the 14-42 kit lens. I tried the 14-42 X lens but the cost didnt justify keeping it. One of the issues I had with my Canon HD recorder is that it couldnt go very wide. So I will most likely look at using a 14mm pancake lens for indoor video and the kit lens or my 45-175 for outdoor video.
     
  7. dixeyk

    dixeyk Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 9, 2010
    Pentax Super Takumar 50/1.4
     
  8. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Filmmaking - Micro Four Thirds User Forum

    There are a TON. Go look in the adapted lens section, or the buy/sell/trade forums. What focal length are you looking for? I'd say to get yourself some Minolta Rokkor, Konica, Pentax Takumar, or Olympus OM older lenses, like a 24mm, 35mm, and 50mm to start with. Also, don't forget that any lens will look crappy if there's not enough light. I'm assuming that you were shooting in good light, and not indoors with just a 15W CFL bulb to light the room, right?
     
  9. jerfo

    jerfo Mu-43 Regular

    26
    May 5, 2011
    Yes, manual focus mode will work on the 20mm lens, but I personally don't like it very much. There's a review of the 20mm lens that explains the manual focus mechanism pretty well: Panasonic Lumix G 20mm F1.7 ASPH Lens Review: 2. Design and Operation: Digital Photography Review. Maybe I just need to use it more to get used to it, but I don't think that it compares to the tactile feedback that you get from adjusting the focus ring on an adapted lens.

    That said, if you're setting focus once and then leaving it alone, it may be just fine for you. If you have to adjust focus a lot during filming, it may annoy you like it annoys me. :smile:

    - Jeff
     
  10. chrith

    chrith Mu-43 Regular

    56
    Nov 12, 2010
    On the wide end alot of people are using the tokina 11-16mm 2.8 with good results. then there is the world of cine lenses you can get lost in. Or you could invest in a set of nikon primes wich alot of people use aswell, 28mm, 35mm and 50mm and you would have a fantastic starting point
     
  11. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    The tokina is certainly out of my budget for now. And the problem I have with video shooting is low light I guess, as someone have mentioned getting prime adapted lens needs enough light to produce satisfying result. So prime adapted lens wouldnt do I guess, I would consider an adapted lens if its not above my affordable budget.
     
  12. John M Flores

    John M Flores Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 7, 2011
    Somerville, NJ
    There are plenty of good, inexpensive, adapted prime lenses. The older lenses are better at manual focus as well. If money is an object, pick a brand - Pentax, Olympus, Minolta, Nikon pre-AI, Canon FD, etc - and use one adapter for multiple lenses.

    It sounds like you have the Panasonic 20. AF is slow. Use it in MF. Add something like a Pentax M50 F1.7 and you have a good 2-lens setup. Use a kit lens for wide shots that establish the context, and that's a good start. Later add a longer prime, i.e., 85/1.4, lights, mic, action!
     
  13. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    I own a Panny 25, not the 20 which AF is slightly faster but for me is still not fast enough.

    I'm planning to get Oly 45 f/1.8 as my next lens, not sure if Pentax M50 will do a good addition if I get it later on.

    I'm still not sure what stuffs to get for lights, or how to tune up the room or outdoor scenes. As for microphone? What do I do? Get a external mounted microphone jack? Not so sure what to do on these. Some tutorials or explanation would be helpful. ^_^

    Thanks again.
     
  14. Manu-4Vendetta

    Manu-4Vendetta Mu-43 Top Veteran

    592
    Jul 8, 2011
    Dominican Republic
    With the mentionated Tokina:

    [ame=http://vimeo.com/33025136]Musgo Trailer on Vimeo[/ame]

    :eek:

    One of betters video with a digital photographic camera. Seems like a RED, very cinematographic. I see this trailer several times in the day. Very inspirational.

    Now i haven't the budget, but i have the dude for future -im saving money- between that Tokina and the native great promise of SLR 12mm f1.6

    I have similar dude, i love the look of Pentax lens, but in my country Canon have all the market, so i order buy a FD 50mm 1.8 and after more lens mount FD.

    PD: Sorry for my bad english.
     
  15. atomic

    atomic Mu-43 Veteran

    224
    Nov 3, 2011
    Unfortunately, if you want high quality audio with the gf2 it looks like your best bet is to get a seperate digital audio recorder (like edirol r09hr, zoom h2) and(ideally) a good pair of external mics. Then sync the audio and video in post. Check out www.taperssection.com for advice on the audio end of things, or spare yourself the expense and the learning curve and ask someone from there to come tape your show.
     
  16. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Well, manual focus is a must for serious video but I wouldn't say no zooming... a zoom lens is a quasi-replacement for a rolling dolly, which is something many people don't have anymore. Instead of using a rolling dolly you can now use a sturdy 2 or 3 way tripod and a zoom lens.
     
  17. speedandstyle

    speedandstyle Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    If you are needing more light , then add it! Unless it is an concert and you have to shoot at that light level. If the video ends up looking too bright you can darken it in post. Video/movie requires adequate light, no way around it. On set they use lights up to 20k watts and often many of them.

    You say you formed a band and that you are shooting video. Do you set the camera on a tripod and then perform in front of it? The reason I ask is because you really need somebody running camera while you perform. A skilled or even semi-skilled camera man is better than it just sitting on a set of sticks. That method might work if you just want to see how you are doing but not for making a music video.

    For sound in a music video - record the track in a studio. It is the only way to have a good sounding music video. If your band is wanting to be the least bit successful you are going to have to have your song recorded in at least a somewhat professional manner. A musician friend of mine has done his own recording at home in a make-shift studio with inputs to his PC.

    When you perform for the camera simply play back your recorded track and fake it. This is the way ALL professional music videos are done{except maybe concert footage and sometimes they are faked too}. Once you have your video add the recorded track in post and viola a music video.
     
  18. Check out the ETC mode

    HERE
    This gives you a teleconversion with no loss of image quality (in 720P, at least). Not as good on the GF2 as the GH2, but don't ignore it. You may be able to use the Olly 12/2 at 24 & 36mm for video. Try the feature with your zoom first to check it out.
    Also, you may wish to get into the EOSHD form, as they there they focus on the HD video side of things. Despite the name, there are lots of Panny m43 enthusiasts there
     
  19. timothysoong

    timothysoong Mu-43 Veteran

    217
    Aug 10, 2011
    Taipei, Taiwan
    Well the sad thing is. Among all my mates Im the only one that knows stuffs about photography. But the thing is I'm a member of the band. Which makes it hard, putting it still would produce a better result than letting a total newbie handle the camera.

    As for recording the music in studio. Do I have to record the vocals and the music seperately? Or record the vocals as the music is playing? Which would produce more professional result?

    Thanks
     
  20. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Separate tracks always, when that option is available (which is one reason why you record in the studio).
     
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