Lens advice: during birth at hospital

Jdad

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I’m excited that I’m gonna be having my first baby in a couple of weeks. I am a new to photography and have a olympus omd m10 III. I have all the lenses. Kit 14-42, 17, 25, 45 and 40-150. My gut tells me to just during birth/delivery go with the kit lens to give max flex of zooming vs prime lens to capture pics and video quick and then save my primes for after delivery. Goal is not to worry too much about photos because want to be present for the birth and remember the moment. Thoughts? Advice?
 

Brodhall

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I’m excited that I’m gonna be having my first baby in a couple of weeks. I am a new to photography and have a olympus omd m10 III. I have all the lenses. Kit 14-42, 17, 25, 45 and 40-150. My gut tells me to just during birth/delivery go with the kit lens to give max flex of zooming vs prime lens to capture pics and video quick and then save my primes for after delivery. Goal is not to worry too much about photos because want to be present for the birth and remember the moment. Thoughts? Advice?
Maybe just focus on the wife and baby. 14-42 in any case is probably your best bet, depending also on the aperture
 

Baenwort

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Our birthing rooms was dim outside of the spot the staff was focused at. Given my desire to focus on her during it and her hatred of being on camera, my pics are all of the kids once they were out.

As such I recommend a fast prime as they don't move much and tend to be close to you.

All my favorite photos came from my Sigma 16mm f1.4 or the 35mmF2.0 of a Fuji X100S.
 

LilSebastian

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Be there for your wife and don’t worry about pictures. We had a doula in the room who took some iPhone pictures as our son was delivered. Mom was exhausted so you won’t be sharing those on social media, maybe with your parents only.

Now, the next day or two in recovery rooms are your best bet. Bring a neutral outfit for yourselves and baby. I would start with the 25mm but that is personal preference. If you have a flash, bounce off ceiling to fill the room.

If the hospital has an in house photographer, let them get the whole family. You don’t have to buy them, but life is long and moments like that don’t happen but once. Consider spending the money for that set too. I’m glad I did.
 

PakkyT

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I recommend the 17mm assuming it is the f1.8. It is going to give you plenty of wide angle, the ability to still get close in, and indoors without a flash you will want the extra 2 stops (on the wide end).

What normally happens is during the birth you will be with your wife and really there won't be much to photography anyway unless you get down to her business end and if she already doesn't like her photo taken, you definitely don't want to risk her murdering you for anything during the birth.

However after that, you can happily photograph as they will take the baby over the warming table, clean him/her up, suck out their nose and mouths of anything, check vitals, weigh them, etc. During this time your wife will not need you as the doctor with be finishing up with her (delivering the placenta, stitches if needed, etc.). Then after you have made 137 photos of the baby on the warming table and scale, they will give the baby to your wife to hold and you can now fight with her about including her in the next 202 shots of baby with mom in the bed.

I got good photos of my kids and I didn't even have the nice camera you have now. I think the last one I shot with the old Olympus C-770UZ, a fixed lens super zoom, but at least on the wide end I had f2.8.
 
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LilSebastian

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Also, shoot RAW + JPG so you have immediate results to share and the RAW for post processing down the road. Software keeps improving so even high ISO shots can be made great.
 

mumu

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When our kids were born I used a 35/1.8 equivalent lens. The doctor encouraged me to bring a camera for taking a few pictures after the birth...obviously not during since I was doing whatever I could to help my wife. The doctor expected me to use a flash but I decided to keep it simple and use ambient light (there was definitely enough).
 
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First, Congratulations @Jdad! What a wonderful event in your lives. Hope everything goes great! Best wishes for a successful delivery and recovery.

All I had at the time my son was born (2004) was an Olympus digital point and shoot. I took it into the delivery room but couldn't really take photos. I wasn't allowed to take photos of certain things. I couldn't move freely around the operating room. She was having a Caesarian, so they didn't want me to see that. I was talking to my wife and holding her hand. Frankly, I was too caught up in the moment to even think about using the camera. One of the nurses took my camera and made a couple of shots of we three after he was brought to me. That's what I have. After the delivery and my son was brought out into the recovery room, I was able to get more photos.

I'm sure one of the attendants will take a photo for you, so my advice would be to have a simple setup so it's foolproof for them to use. They're probably used to using a smartphone. Probably best to use P or full Auto. OK to use a flash to make sure you get a shot with enough DOF.
 
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rlb

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Congrats! Hope you're catching up on your sleep now :D

I couldn't agree more with both of these posts, just focus on the after photos. Fast prime to work with the lighting is what I did last fall when my #2 was born. During the birth you'll be too consumed otherwise, and your wife will need you. And you'll want to be focused on everything that's happening, because it is a truly amazing process both in what a woman endures and what her body can do. Congrats again and best wishes to you and your family!


Be there for your wife and don’t worry about pictures. We had a doula in the room who took some iPhone pictures as our son was delivered. Mom was exhausted so you won’t be sharing those on social media, maybe with your parents only.

Now, the next day or two in recovery rooms are your best bet. Bring a neutral outfit for yourselves and baby. I would start with the 25mm but that is personal preference. If you have a flash, bounce off ceiling to fill the room.

If the hospital has an in house photographer, let them get the whole family. You don’t have to buy them, but life is long and moments like that don’t happen but once. Consider spending the money for that set too. I’m glad I did.
I recommend the 17mm assuming it is the f1.8. It is going to give you plenty of wide angle, the ability to still get close in, and indoors without a flash you will want the extra 2 stops (on the wide end).

What normally happens is during the birth you will be with your wife and really there won't be much to photography anyway unless you get down to her business end and if she already doesn't like her photo taken, you definitely don't want to risk her murdering you for anything during the birth.

However after that, you can happily photograph as they will take the baby over the warming table, clean him/her up, suck out their nose and mouths of anything, check vitals, weigh them, etc. During this time your wife will not need you as the doctor with be finishing up with her (delivering the placenta, stitches if needed, etc.). Then after you have made 137 photos of the baby on the warming table and scale, they will give the baby to your wife to hold and you can now fight with her about including her in the next 202 shots of baby with mom in the bed.

I got good photos of my kids and I didn't even have the nice camera you have now. I think the last one I shot with the old Olympus C-770UZ, a fixed lens super zoom, but at least on the wide end I had f2.8.
 
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Besperus

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You got it right. 14 to 42... sterilize first! the best you can, ultraviolet light will do it, but needs to pass the operating room specs if doing a c-section. In a regular birthing situation, you should be fine. No flash. High ISO. Program mode or shutter priority, stopping excited shaking hands. Congragulations!
 

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