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lens & adapter help for Lumix GF3

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Count_Fleet, Sep 16, 2015.

  1. Count_Fleet

    Count_Fleet New to Mu-43

    4
    Sep 16, 2015
    Greetings all. First, I have read through many posts in the adapter thread as well as the panasonic forum and I'm still lost and bewildered. I'm sorry. I'm very new.

    I have had the gf3 for a few years now and while the stock 14-42 lens was fine for a beginner such as myself when I went to SE Asia and was shooting temples, landscapes, and still portraits, I recently dug out my camera and would like to get a new lens.

    I'm mainly interested in a lens that is more capable for shooting action shots with as little blur as possible. rather than spend $400-500 for the summilux 25 mm m4/3 lens, I was thinking I could save some money by getting an adapter with an appropriate lens.

    this is where I get lost and overwhelmed. I'm trying to learn, but does anyone have any suggestions for a good adapter and lens combo for less blur when people or pets are moving? is this even possible?

    thanks in advance for any help and suggestions! great forum, hope to learn lots here.
     
  2. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    For action shots you need two things: a lens with fast auto-focus (AF) and a lens able to gather enough light. During the day there is plenty of light to freeze action so any lens is fine. At sunset or indoor a faster lens makes a difference.
    AF is also very good on almost any m43 lenses. Unless you are shooting a dog running straight at you you should be able to do it with the 14-42 or almost any other lens. It takes a little practice.

    It's probably more about technique then lens capabilities but it could depends on what you tried to shoot and where. Dogs, hockey, birds in flight, motorbikes, etc. can be difficult to shoot for the lens and the photographer. What do you plan shooting?

    The basic idea is to use a fast shutter speed: you set the camera on shutter priority mode (S) with a value around 500. If you set the camera on Auto-ISO you should not need much more. Hard to explain it better in a few lines. The blur you see in the pictures could be due to a too slow shutter speed or to the focus not being where you wanted. Do you have a few samples to share?

    I really doubt that you are going to save money with an adapter and there are many good lenses cheaper then the summilux. You can save money adapting manual focus lenses but these are even more difficult to use for action shots.
    Also a 25mm lens could require you to get quite close to the subject so a 45/1.8 or 42.5/1.7 or 60/2.8 for sports could be better.
     
  3. Count_Fleet

    Count_Fleet New to Mu-43

    4
    Sep 16, 2015
    thank you for your advice.

    maybe i'm asking something way beyond my skill level, but I can't seem to get non-blurry shots with the stock 14-42 lens no matter what setting I select. and to narrow it down somewhat, let's consider an optimal setup for indoor action shots. like in an office setting for, say, behind the scenes shots of a production company.

    would i be able to adapt a cheap yongnuo 50 mm f1.8 lens to my camera with an adapter? would that help? i think at my skill level I want something that can still do auto focus.

    yar!
     
  4. Count_Fleet

    Count_Fleet New to Mu-43

    4
    Sep 16, 2015
    follow up: would a fixed lens be ideal or should I be looking at a lens with some amount of zoom? i definitely don't think I need a huge zoom, if at all.

    thanks all!
     
  5. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    To freeze normal human movements (not sports) a shutter speed of 1/100 is usually enough, 1/250 to play safe. These speeds are easy to get even at f5.6 also with low ISO values 200-800. If you are not familiar with the exposure triangle this probably won't make much sense to you. If so, I suggest you to watch a few videos on youtube about exposure or a book like "Understanding exposure".

    Cheap adapters do not support auto-focus. You can find adapters with AF but they cost 400+$ so you wont save any money.
    The sigma lenses, 19, 30 and 60 are very good and cheap (150/200$). For indoor backstage shooting the 19mm is probably the best focal length, while the 30 and 60 are more portrait oriented. An alternative is to buy used lenses.

    Zoom vs fixed: all zoom lenses, except for very expensive PRO lenses, are as fast as the lens you already have. So if the problem is speed then zoom lenses are not the solution. Fixed lenses are faster, like 1.8 or 2.8.

    But before buying anything I'd try to understand if the problem is shutter speed, AF speed or technique by looking at the details of the failed shots (aperture, shutter speed and ISO).
     
  6. Count_Fleet

    Count_Fleet New to Mu-43

    4
    Sep 16, 2015
    wow, thank you. this will help me get started, and not waste any money. thank you so much!
     
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