Lens adapter for EPL1 to use Konica FP-1 lens

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by thedon, Sep 13, 2012.

  1. thedon

    thedon Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Sep 9, 2012
    I have various lens from a Konica Fp-1 that I want to use on an EPl-1.

    I can post photos of the lens if necessary, but I would like to know what is the best adapter (value/function) to make this combination work?

    Does anyone have experience with it?

    Any help is appreciated.

    Thank you.
     
  2. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    What you're looking for is a Konica AR-mount to :43: adapter. Just search on eBay or Google for Konica to Micro Four Thirds adapter and then figure out how much you want to spend. You should find adapters starting around $10. I have a Fotasy adapter that works well.

    Which lenses do you have?
     
  3. thedon

    thedon Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Sep 9, 2012
    The lens that I have are:

    1. Soligor 70-210mm No. 382022350 1:45 (Auto Zoom)
    2. Konica Hexanon AR, 40mm F1.8 40/1.8
    3. Star-D MC 1:3.5-4.5, F=28-80mm No. 8401646

    Sorry if any of the info is unclear, as you can tell I am novice...LOL

    Thanks so much.
     
  4. Grinch

    Grinch Mu-43 Top Veteran

    813
    Jan 9, 2011
    Canada
    Don't know about the others, but your 40 1.8 has been a very popular option on m43 cams. The AR mount has one of the shorter register distances, which is somewhat advantageous as it in line with the size and scale of m43 cams. Oh and it's considered a fairly sharp lens as well.
     
  5. thedon

    thedon Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Sep 9, 2012
    Great news.

    I am really looking for forward to experimenting with them.
     
  6. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    Hexanon 40/1.8 is a very nice little lens. I don't have any experience with the other two. Zooms (especially third-party zooms) from that era (early 70's?) are not particularly highly regarded in general, but there are always exceptions. At the least, they combine to give you a very wide range of focal lengths. You should be able to have some fun and get some decent results from them. Once you get an adapter, please come back and share your impressions and images.
     
  7. thedon

    thedon Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Sep 9, 2012
    I surely will post some shots when I have them working.

    I just ordered from Amazon and I won't have the opportunity try them for about two weeks, but when I do I will certainly come back report.

    Does anyone know which lens configuration would be best for shooting interior and architecture?

    Thanks
     
  8. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    Shooting interior and architecture are both (generally) best suited to wide angle lenses. The :43: crop factor (due to the small sensor size) means that your 40mm lens has approximately the same field of view when adapted to :43: as an 80mm lens would on the 35mm film camera for which it was designed. This makes it a short telephoto lens, which is well suited to portrait work, but less well useful for general interior shooting or architecture work.

    The only real (i.e. affordable) options for wide angle on :43: are the native lenses. The kit zooms are going to be your most affordable choices, but you'll want to consider the Panasonic 14mm and 20mm and the Olympus 12mm if you want/need a faster lens. There are also the (more expensive) ultra wide angle zooms (O9-18 or P7-14) if you need something even wider.

    Of the three AR-mount lenses you have, I would say that the 28-80mm zoom is going to be your best option for interior/architecture shooting, but none is ideally suited to those tasks.
     
  9. thedon

    thedon Mu-43 Rookie

    10
    Sep 9, 2012
    Thanks for the advice.

    On slightly different note.
    The one issue I have noticed is that in certain conditions the Auto Focus "hunts" without ever focusing and does not allow you take a picture. Now, I have read that there are know issues such as this in low light, however, I would not consider these completely low light situations, and more importantly, you literally can not take a photo, and if it does snap the photo it can sometimes be very blurry.

    Did you experience these issues? Any insight as how I can fix?

    I have read also that the second version of the kit lens also helps, but I am hoping that there could be a solution without having to upgrade the lens.
     
  10. DeeJayK

    DeeJayK Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Feb 8, 2011
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Keith
    Yes, that is a common complaint of the early PENs (E-P1/2 and E-PL1/2). I have experienced it myself, but not all that often and generally only in low light. When it does occur I will generally just switch to MF. Another possible solution is to find something in the scene that is approximately the same distance away that has more light or more contrast...pre-focus on that object and then recompose your shot. One other thing to try is to turn off face detect and to use single-point AF. Some have suggested bringing along a small flashlight to function as an AF assist lamp, but I have not tried that method.

    The mark II version of the O14-42 kit lens represents a complete redesign and among the major improvements are a faster and quieter focusing motor. However, this lens is not completely immune to focus hunting in low light, as the ability to lock AF is more a function of the body than the lens.

    The later PENs (after the E-PL2) and all the Panasonic bodies include an AF assist lamp.
     
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