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Lens 101 (45 f1.8)

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by steelerdan69, Oct 3, 2011.

  1. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    So I have always loved taking pictures but mostly with point & shoots and just bought two cameras. The nex5n and epm-1 and retuned the Nex5n kept the Oly. Now comes buying lens! 20mm, 45mm and 12mm. I read on dpreview on threads about how fun the 45 mm f1.8 is! How fun the 20mm 1.7 is! What makes them fun?is there a website on what lens to use? Like why use a 20 mm ,45mm or 12 mm. I'm just trying to learn here. I'm looking into buying a new lens and don't know which one to buy. I really love those photos with the bokeh. thanks guys
     
  2. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Give us an idea of what kind of photos you like to take, and we'll give you a better understanding of which lens is best suited for it and why. :)
     
  3. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    I mostly take my camera out for taking pictures of my kids school activities, every year we do Disneyland , I take out "Lucha Libre " Shows and concerts. Pretty much it. Last week I got married and used the NEX and epmi and I thought the Oly took better pics. On some I couldn't even tell a difference so i kept the oly due to $200 less and better lens selection and better prices and smaller too.
     
  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Since you're taking a lot of "people pictures", I would suggest a portrait length lens like the m.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8. It is designed much like a rangefinder lens (similar in shape and size to my M39 screwmount 50mm f/1.5), and I think that's part of the "fun" you asked about. ;) Being a longer focal length than the rest of the native primes also makes it better for things like shows and concerts which you listed.
     
  5. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    989
    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    Really, don't invest in the "best" lenses until you're comfortable with the camera, because you're just going to confuse yourself. Use your 14-42mm lens and get used to the camera. Be aware of what you're doing when you twist all the dials on the camera and lens, notice that when you zoom the lens, you adjust the focus from 14mm to 42mm. Notice the difference that they give you.

    The 20mm and 45mm are "fun" because they have amazing image quality and wide apertures, which allows you to blur the backgrounds and shoot in lower light without turning up the ISO. Don't buy something just because someone online says it's good, and better than what you have. If you don't know why you need it, don't waste your money.
     
  6. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    Ned & shnitz are u guys pro photographers? I do want the new 45 mm, I really want to take portrait shot of my kids with that bokeh look. Got birthdays coming up and need to take pics inside our house. Just got the Franiec grip and works great looks great too. Also bought the pen case($14) but it's way too small. I have to put it in sideway. Might return it. Hoping to get Sony sling shot case but it's only available in eBay Japan. The Sony bag has room for the nex5 with 16 mm and zoom lens, i know it's Sony but can't tell
     
  7. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    Another question! I have a Samsung plasma(d7000) and really like to see our photos thru the apple tv. By default the mini is set to 3.2 aspect ratio, I think it is? If I set to 16x9 , how will that affect my pictures if I print them?
     
  8. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    You don't need to be a "pro" to understand lenses. There are plenty of pros that don't. I can assure you that both Shnitz and Ned understand lenses. Having said that, the 45mm 1.8 is a fine lens for portraits and should be awesome on your new Pen.

    Prime Lenses 101: Leaving sharpness, number of aperture blades, construction, design, autofocus and size/weight out of the equation there are two main things about a particular lens that will affect it's character. Focal length and the maximum aperture. The longer the focal length the narrow the angle of view that a lens has, hence things appear "closer". You can get the same subject size in the frame with any lens as long as you are prepared to move your feet.

    What a longer lens (telephoto is technically the wrong term but has come into common usage) will do is give you a narrower angle of view and therefore less background in the shot. It will also move you further away from your subject to get the same subject size and that will affect both perspective (the apparent relationship between objects in a scene; i.e.; how big something looks relative to another) and compression (also called scale in some areas; it's whether objects in a scene looked more 2d or 3D). Longer lenses will compress the scene more. This is flattering for close portrait shots. Longer lenses are suitable when you want to have your subject isolated from the environment (head and shoulders portraits). The 45mm is a short telephoto lens.

    A wide lens has a wider angle of view. At the same shooting position your subject will appear further away and smaller in the frame. Assuming you subject is the same size in the frame as when you used the longer lens (because you moved closer) you will also include more of the background when using a wide lens. You will also be closer to your subject and therefore stretch perspective (foreground and background objects will appear further apart). This can do some not very flattering things to portraits (like make a subjects ears look like their five feet from the tip of the nose) and should be used carefully. Wide lenses are good for full length portraits and environmental portraits. The 12mm is a wide lens.

    A standard lens is one that has a perspective similar to what you see. It's a strange term as everyone sees the world a bit differently but in m4/3 terms its around the 20-25mm mark.

    The other factor is the aperture. It has an effect on exposure and depth of field. The term "bokeh" as you used it above is incorrect. Bokeh refers to the *quality* of the out of focus areas in a scene, not the quantity. You're looking for a shallow depth of field (DOF). The aperture (also called the f stop) is the width of the lens opening relative to it's focal length. For example if you had a 25mm lens and it also had a width of 25mm (glass, not overall) then it would be an f1 (f-stop) lens. If it is 12.5mm across it would be an f2 lens. There are several factors that affect depth of field and aperture is the main one. The wider the aperture (smaller number) the shallower the DOF. So at f 2 you'll get a shallower DOF than at f4 (assuming nothing else changed.) Moving closer or further away from your subject will affect DOF (closer = less), but this will change the size of your subject as well.

    That's the basics. Learn these rules. Then when you have them sorted you'll learn when and how to break them. That's part 2.

    The easiest way to see this stuff is with a zoom lens. Go into your back yard (or a park) and find a subject (anything that doesn't move will do - about the height of a person). Set your lens to its widest position and frame up your subject. Take a shot (this is important - you'll want to look at these on a big screen later). then set your zoom to its longest. Move back until the subject is the same size and in the same place in the frame, take a shot and then compare them. The subject should be the same but it's what has changed that's important. do this a thousand times and it becomes completely natural to be able to see it before you shoot it. Unfortunately nothing beats practice.

    Gordon
     
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  9. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    By default the EPM1 is set to 4:3 ratio. That suits 8x10, 12x16 but not 6x4 (postcard prints). That's 3:2. If you set your camera to 16:9 you can either print so there's blank space at the top and bottom of the print or crop the sides off to fill the paper. There's actually no real point setting the mini to 16:9 as you can also do this on your computer just as effectively.

    Gordon
     
  10. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    Thanks, wow ! Can u answer my second question, on 16x9? That was a great lens 101!
     
  11. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    Thanks flash!
     
  12. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    Flash!
    So bokeh is the Quality of the blur,right? I hear the word "creamy" a lot when referring to the bokeh. So how is the quality of bokeh of the Oly 45mm f18? To you ?
     
  13. What exactly is bokeh anyway? My understanding was that bokeh is generated from point light sources or reflections in the background, as opposed to general out-of-focus blur.
     
  14. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    If he's using his TV, I imagine he wants to connect his camera directly. I didn't think people actually did this, but I guess all the manufacturers include those cables for a reason. Point is, it's nice to frame and crop right in camera if that's how you use your camera.

    As for why these lenses are "fun", I think you should read Seeing Prime. I don't necessarily think photography is all about primes, but it's a very interesting look at why fast prime lenses are so popular with enthusiasts.
     
  15. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Promit Roy
    Bokeh is background blur. But distinct shapes like point lights highlight the exact bokeh pattern much more distinctly, and are popular with review sites because they're kinda blunt. My personal take is that a really good bokeh pattern is one that disappears, pushing attention away from itself and towards your subject. That's at least as much about composition as lens. But you can use the bokeh as a 'focus' of attention (haha!) too.
     
  16. ZephyrZ33

    ZephyrZ33 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    685
    Nov 18, 2010
    Southern California
    I would go with 20mm for versatility and indoor low-light performance first (where your MFT shines.) I had the 20 glued to my PEN for a year straight and was able to take it everywhere.

    The 45mm is lovely, but I'd be fustrated if that was my first prime. It takes a little discpline to shoot with this kind of reach. It's not that "fun" indoors unless you're limiting yourself to one subject and have enough room to get it in focus. Kind of like swinging a broad-sword in close quarters.
     
  17. steelerdan69

    steelerdan69 Mu-43 Regular

    35
    Aug 23, 2011
    Is there something similar to this panny that Olympus makes?
     
  18. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    The 17mm/2.8 pancake, slightly wider angle.
     
  19. Markb

    Markb Mu-43 Top Veteran

    532
    Jun 9, 2011
    Kent, UK
    Mark
    Strictly it's a term used to describe the quality of the out of focus areas. So yes, a smooth out of focus rendition is desired. Here's one from a lens reckoned to be among the best at out of focus rendition, a Leica 50mm Summicron (on 35mm film). Note how the shiny highlights on the right interrupt the flow of the bokeh.

    694781115_9d67ef4a19.
    Egyptian gallery by Mark Bowerman, on Flickr
     
  20. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    Maybe. I saw the word "print" and dived right in.:smile: but even so, on most m4/3 sensors all you're doing by using ratios other than 4:3 is cropping the shot (GH series excluded). So keeping the full fram gives you options later that cropping doesn't.

    Gordon