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Legacy Zooms, Images and Ideas

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by Lawrence A., May 10, 2013.

  1. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    I've read here and there that most legacy zooms should be avoided, and I've been skeptical. But I'd replaced most of my OM zooms with primes, so I didn't have to0 much of an opportunity to test. I recently had a chance to get again one of my favorite Zuiko zooms of yore for $23. So when the almost pristine 75-150 f4 arrived today, I just had to walk out front and test it.

    The first shot is at 75mm, the second at 150mm, and I think the lens performed well in both. Both were post-processed from raw with typical settings, no special sharpening or defringing, which was not needed. As I'm getting ready to sell my 40-150mm f3.5 - 4.5 Zuiko digital, I was pleased that the long end is well covered by the legacy glass.

    P5101426.

    P5101424.
     
  2. klee

    klee Mu-43 Veteran

    367
    Mar 20, 2013
    Houston, TX
    Kevin
    what were people saying about zooms?

    I just dug up an 80-200 f4 Hexanon and found it as pleasing as your zuiko. Love it, can't wait to shoot more with it.

    I'm debating whether or not to steal some m42 mount lenses from my dad's cache. there's a sigma zoom, a tamron zoom... but I don't have an adapter yet.
     
  3. heli-mech

    heli-mech Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Mar 9, 2012
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Andrew
    The only real problems I encountered (in regards to oly bodies) with legacy zooms is setting the focal length for IBIS, and having to go in and out of magnified view when you do any zooming to confirm composition as well as focus. Whereas a lens like the 4/3's 50-200mm sets the focal length and can be set to auto-magnify when you move the focus ring, just alot more user friendly.
     
  4. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    Go for it. Fotodiox adapters are inexpensive and good.
     
  5. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    I agree, although I have auto magnify turned off anyway, as I keep inadvertent sending the Pl 25 f1.4 in that mode when it's on. I've set the IBIS to 100 on the 75-150 and to 50 on the 35-75. I haven't yet encountered any problem, but I haven't yet used shutter speeds where stabilization is crucial either. I'll report back when I do.

    Mostly, I use legacy primes -- and native primes for that matter, although there aren't any really long ones. The zuiko 135mm on a 2X-A adapter is still very sharp on the E-M5. But I always loved the 75-150 and was curious to see how it would work on the digital body. I think it works great, and the work arounds don't really bother me. I found the auto focus on the regular 4/3 lens used on m4/3 bodies was starting to drive me crazy, and if I'm going to manually focus, I prefer the tactile feedback of real manual focus lenses to focus by wire. My question was, "Are legacy zooms really that bad?" And I have to say that for me the answer is a resounding "NO". I actually enjoy the process of using them, though I certainly understand why others might not.
     
  6. Lawrence A.

    Lawrence A. Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 14, 2012
    New Mexico
    Larry
    Zuiko 35-70 f3.5-4.5

    I prefer real zooms to variable focus lenses, real zooms with fixed maximum apertures, but I've had this lens around for ages, unused and unloved, so thought I'd give it a try. I used it as my main lens on the OM-1 during a couple of lean years when it was all I had covering the range. It's an odd range on m4/3, but I would not hesitate to use it if I had to.

    Using the close focus at 70mm and f8, not macro, but useful.

    P5111439.

    And a quick grab of a neighborhood cat that was parked outside when I got home from walking my dog. Sorry I did not notice the zoom, but the aperture was f5.6

    P5111440.
     
  7. heli-mech

    heli-mech Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Mar 9, 2012
    Vancouver Island, Canada
    Andrew
    I had a Canon FD 80-200mm F4L for a brief period, truly outstanding lens, unfortunately it was a ebay purchase and had some non-disclosed light fungus so I returned it. Sharpness, color, contrast was VERY good, however my above mentioned issues did bother me a bit.

    As far as auto-magnify, I just have one of the MYSET's setup with MF and auto magnify, and IS on half press. That way when I mount a non-AF lens I just set that myset and I am off.
     
  8. juangrande

    juangrande Mu-43 Top Veteran

    805
    Dec 2, 2012
    COLORADO
    I had a 70-210 f3.5 Vivitar Series 1 with haze and some fungus that took pretty nice images. A clean one would do better. It's large and heavy, tho. I ended up giving it away to a member here.
     
  9. RnR

    RnR Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 25, 2011
    Brisbane, Australia
    Hasse
  10. HarryS

    HarryS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    918
    Jun 23, 2012
    Midwest, USA
    I've owned the OM 75-150 since the early 80's. Probably never shot more than 36 frames with it. Even less usage on digital (E510 DSLR). I took it out this week to try again.

    The lens is heavy and could benefit from IBIS but it's unwieldy to set the IBIS focal length every time I re-zoom. With care, and PP to adjust the contrast, it's OK. I will stick with my M.ED 40-150.

    Price is up to $23? When I looked on ebay six years ago, they were barely getting $20. I probably paid $150-200 in 1980 for mine.

    Here's the nearest cat.
     

    Attached Files:

  11. penfan2010

    penfan2010 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 12, 2010
    NJ, USA
    A few with the Olympus OM 70-150mm F4, with both the GX-7 and E-M5.

    Heavy cropping on this one, shot with GX-7
    P1040296.

    Two with the E-M5, again with some cropping.
    P1040332.

    P1040365.
     
  12. datagov

    datagov Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 2, 2012
    New York
    I have tested a lot of legacy zooms - Vivitar Series 1 70-210 f3.5, Canon 80-200 f4 L, and the Tokina sz-x 60-300 f4-5.6 - alongside many legacy telephoto primes - Pentax-M 200mm f4, Nikkor 200mm f4 AIS, Takumar 200mm f3.5. Most legacy zooms and telphotos built before 1985 have purple fringing and CA. The Canon and the Tokina are late 80's designs and have little to no CA or purple fringing. But when it comes to sharpness and resolution, lens diameter really makes a difference for our small M43 sensors. The wider the diameter the bigger the sweetspot is for maximum sharpness. The Pentax and Nikkors are 52mm and they are pretty sharp. The Canon is a 58mm, Vivitar is 62mm, the Tokina 67mm, and the Takumar must be 77mm. In my informal experience, the Tokina and the Takumar are the sharpest @ 200mm @f8, and the Tokina only cost me $30. The canon is almost as sharp and has no CA, and its still sharp at f4, but it cost $300 and it isn't worth 10x as much as the Tokina. Its got a red line on the rim and it says "L" on it. But its still manual focus and you have to be really skilled to get a good shot every time with it. I will sell most of my legacy zooms and telephotos, hold on to the Tokina and buy an Olympus 75-300 II.