Leave your IS on

Phocal

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So which is it? You contradicted yourself.
No I didn’t.............

rather than do a separate reply to each person I contained them all in one post. My reply to your original post was "If your IS on image is sharper than your IS off image you either have a problem with your camera or your tripod is not as stable as you think."

my reply to someone else that you quoted was "in modern cameras/lenses I have not seen any problems with leaving it on."

not a contradiction at all. but if you want to include what I said to someone else ok................................I basically stated that leaving IS doesn't cause any problems when on tripod. Your original post states that photos are not as sharp with IS off, which by all conventional thinking it should be sharp and according to some the IS image should be the not sharp one.

I still maintain what I originally said. either your tripod is not stable and that is why the image is not sharp with IS off or you have a problem with your camera when IS is turned off because if the tripod was stable the IS off image should be sharp. if you used the delay or a remote then the camera has a problem or your tripod is not stable. if you pressed the button without a delay it could be use causing the camera to move (which IS should keep the image sharp as you saw) and the image without IS could very well be not as sharp.
 

ArizonaMike

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I am not talking about static discharge and you are being a little ridiculous, since once incased in the lens the chance of static discharge is very remote. Not to mention that they also coat circuit boards in a resin to prevent just that.

So please........don’t resort to reductio ad absurdum to try and prove a point.
I do not understand what seems like a great deal of anger in your post. If you disagree with something that someone says I do not know why you can not respond in a polite way to answer. Everyone here wants to learn and if you have something to contribute, why not do it in a polite and useful way rather than waving your arms around (figuratively)?
 
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exekutive

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not a contradiction at all.
Ok so you meant that both results should have been sharp. It's a plausible hypothesis.

(You need to throw in the odd comma or full stop, because your run-on sentences are a little hard to follow.)

with IS off, which by all conventional thinking it should be sharp
Conventional thinking is often wrong. But we'll see.

either your tripod is not stable ... if you used the delay
The article states I used a delay. Three legged tripods don't rock. I set it on a firm, level surface. There was no wind. To me it seemed like a pretty normal tripod setup that the average photographer might use. ie. real world conditions.

But, for the sake of science, I can eliminate that variable. I can try the experiment again, but I'll bolt the camera to something rigid (which is completely unrealistic).
 

Phocal

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Ok so you meant that both results should have been sharp. It's a plausible hypothesis.

(You need to throw in the odd comma or full stop, because your run-on sentences are a little hard to follow.)


Conventional thinking is often wrong. But we'll see.


The article states I used a delay. Three legged tripods don't rock. I set it on a firm, level surface. There was no wind. To me it seemed like a pretty normal tripod setup that the average photographer might use. ie. real world conditions.

But, for the sake of science, I can eliminate that variable. I can try the experiment again, but I'll bolt the camera to something rigid (which is completely unrealistic).
FYI.........I don’t click links in forums so no idea what you wrote, only had what you wrote on the forum to go by...........sorry but I was typing fast because I had a viewing for a friends mom to get to befor my first reply and a funeral for another friends dad to go before the 2nd..............now I need a drink, have had 5 friends lose parents in the last 4 weeks.......
 

Matt Drown

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At least as far as the EM1.2 is concerned. Olympus says that the IBIS is turned off automatically when the camera is on a tripod. From pg. 30 in the current FW version 2.0 of the manual.
• To reduce camera blur, mount the camera on a sturdy tripod and use a remote cable (P. 155).
...
• [Image Stabilizer] (P. 53) turns off automatically.
Technically speaking, it's in reference to shooting in BULB/LIVE Time mode, not general shooting. I looked this up earlier today as I have an EM1.2 and a Pen-f (same overall comments)

Also on Page 53 it says if using non micro-4/3 or non-4/3 lenses, turn off the IS if using a tripod. It does not have the counter description if using native lenses.

I don't normally use a tripod, so I can't add any personal experience to this thread. The only relevant information I can add is that High-Res shooting turns off IS for obvious reasons.... :)
 

Clint

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With any of the OM-Ds mounted to an an Arca Swiss Z-1 in turn mounted to a set of Gitzo 3541LS legs, and my hand slightly resting on the lens directly above the mounting point - I have never seen any difference between photos with IS on of off. So I just leave it on.

I also have a smaller carbon fiber travel tripod (5 section) and shooting with anything over 100mm long, I make sure IS is On - unless everything is real stable and there is no wind.
 

PakkyT

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If you disagree with something that someone says I do not know why you can not respond in a polite way to answer. Everyone here wants to learn and if you have something to contribute, why not do it in a polite and useful way rather than waving your arms around (figuratively)?
I am not seeing where his post was anything but polite. There was even a please in it. Now if you meant 'why don't you agree with what I said', then OK. But not agreeing with you is not the same thing as impoliteness nor arm waving.
 

speedy

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Your loss.
The only thing I've lost, is time reading & replying here. Which would be far better spent READING THE MANUAL of my camera. As opposed to reading what some random on the interwebz has written, about their unnamed camera, unnamed lens, & unnamed tripod. No, I'm not going to wander off following click bait links, especially when they start with "people spreading myths" when in fact the manufacturers own literature suggests otherwise. If one takes the time to READ it.
 

Holoholo55

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Technically speaking, it's in reference to shooting in BULB/LIVE Time mode, not general shooting. I looked this up earlier today as I have an EM1.2 and a Pen-f (same overall comments)

Also on Page 53 it says if using non micro-4/3 or non-4/3 lenses, turn off the IS if using a tripod. It does not have the counter description if using native lenses.

I don't normally use a tripod, so I can't add any personal experience to this thread. The only relevant information I can add is that High-Res shooting turns off IS for obvious reasons.... :)
That's correct, it refers to Bulb/Live Time mode, but I believe it applies to anytime one is putting it on a tripod and making long or longish exposures.
 
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ArizonaMike

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I am not seeing where his post was anything but polite.
What struck me as very angry was your line:

> So please........don’t resort to reductio ad absurdum to try and prove a point

In fact I was responding to your statement about circuit boards when I pointed out that lenses were not circuit boards. You posted:

I have been an electronic tech for a long time (almost 30 years) and I was taught to always turn off power before removing some like a circuit card in a system. Why? Because there is a chance (very small but still a chance) that you could cause a spark or some other surge or something that could damage electronic circuits.

and I responded that this applied to circuit boards, and not to well insulated lenses. As such I did not see why you thought that was a "reduction to absurdity". I was only responding to part of your post and saying that while what you said was true, it did not apply to the current question and lenses are not open and naked electronics.

I do not disagree about turning off a camera before switching lenses, and said so, but your post did not contain any information about electrical contacts coming in touch with other contracts during the removal process in the post I responded to. That came later so, again, I do not think that my response was absurd as it was just a response to what you wrote.

Perhaps I am wrong, but your comment sounded like an ad hominem attack, and so I responded as I did, asking why you were so angry. If my understanding of your post was wrong I apologize.
 

DennyVanNostrand

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Technically speaking, it's in reference to shooting in BULB/LIVE Time mode, not general shooting. I looked this up earlier today as I have an EM1.2 and a Pen-f (same overall comments)

Also on Page 53 it says if using non micro-4/3 or non-4/3 lenses, turn off the IS if using a tripod. It does not have the counter description if using native lenses.

I don't normally use a tripod, so I can't add any personal experience to this thread. The only relevant information I can add is that High-Res shooting turns off IS for obvious reasons.... :)
From page 53 of the EM1 Mkii manual.
Using lenses other than Micro Four Thirds/Four Thirds System lenses
You can use focal length information to reduce camera shake when shooting with lenses that
are not Micro Four Thirds or Four Thirds system lenses.
• Set [Image Stabilizer], press the Q button, press the INFO button, then use FGHI to
select a focal length, and press the Q button.
• Choose a focal length between 0.1 mm and 1000.0 mm.
• Choose the value that matches the one printed on the lens.
• The image stabilizer cannot correct excessive camera shake or camera shake that occurs
when the shutter speed is set to the slowest speed. In these cases, it is recommended
that you use a tripod.
• When using a tripod, set [Image Stabilizer] to [OFF].
• When using a lens with an image stabilization function switch, priority is given to the lens
side setting.
• When priority is given to the lens side image stabilization, [S-IS1] is used instead of [S-IS
AUTO].
• You may notice an operating sound or vibration when the image stabilizer is activated.
 

Holoholo55

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From page 53 of the EM1 Mkii manual.
I used IBIS when I used a Kiron 105 macro lens in manual mode (Minolta MD mount). Set the FL to 105 and the IBIS worked great. Helped a lot to reduce the shake just looking through the EVF for focusing. I saw it in action instantly when I half-pressed the shutter release when handheld.
 

Ross the fiddler

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That's interesting. I know my M10.2 constantly hums, even with IS turned off or in review mode, so the sensor may be held in place with magnetic fields too.

Tripod is just a plain telescopic aluminum one. I could try weighing it down next time.
That's OK if you hum along in tune with it or it mightn't be so well appreciated around you. :p :rolleyes: :D
 

Mike_D

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If you look at any of the Olympus camera manuals you will see they say to turn off the camera when removing/attaching the lens. FYI, it’s on page 16 of the EM1mk2 manual. Why is that? Because there is the chance (no matter how small) of something happening when removing/attaching the lens to a camera that is powered on.
I have been told by a Canon tech support guy that another reason to turn off the camera before removing the lenses is to diminish dust on the sensor. When the camera is powered up there is a static charge on the sensor which causes it to attract dust. So by turning off the camera before exposing the sensor to the outside world your sensor stays cleaner. I assume the same is true for Olympus.
 

Lawrence Beck

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I recently bought an EM5 Mk2 along with the 12-40 Pro lens for underwater photography. It was my first Olympus camera ever, and I chose Olympus due to the small size, quality of the 12-40 as a one lens solution and the availability of an inexpensive Meikon underwater housing. I've always used Leica optics with adapters on prior cameras... including a Leica DMR, Sony A77 and a Samsung NX1.

I own the Leica pre modular 280 and 400 APO 2.8 lenses and have owned the Modular 400 and 800 Leica APO lenses in the past and have tested both systems side by side with a number of tripod heads and tripods, including Series 5 Gitzo metal and carbon fiber tripods. A laser pointer was attached to the lens hoods and deflection was measured on a wall at 20 meters distance to assess lens stability after one of the tripod legs was tapped.

Recently I decided to test my Leica 280 and 400 APO 2.8 lenses with and without the 1.4 and 2X APO teleconverters to see the results with the Olympus OMD EM5 Mk2. I had read somewhere that using full frame lenses was not a good idea on cameras with smaller sensors for a reason that seemed nonsensical to me... which it proved to be. Older Leica APO full frame Leica lenses have no digital correction and had to be designed to higher tolerances or specifications because of this. The price of these lenses reflects this. And because of the smaller sensor, any imperfection of the optic at the edges is eliminated... though a quality adapter is absolutely necessary if edge sharpness is desired.

On my initial tests I used a 2 second delay and inadvertently left the Olympus IS "on". Test subjects were shot wide open at 2.8, 3.5, 4.0, 4.5 and 5.6. The camera was mounted to an Arca Swiss B1 head that was mounted to a Gitzo Series 5 metal tripod with the center column fully collapsed. A Fotodiox m43 to Leica R adapter was used. The tripod was indoors so as to avoid any wind, and I placed a one pound rice bag where the camera body was attached to the lens. Subjects were as close as 30 meters and as far as 1 km. Air temperature was 72˚F, or 22.2˚ C. Iso 200 used for all shots and the shortest shutter speed used, for the 400mm lens and stacked teleconverters at f5.6 (f16 equivalent considering a three stop light loss with both teleconverters) was 1/160.

The Fotodiox exhibited some clockwise/counterclockwise play, as well as a very slight gap at the top of the adapter due to the weight of the camera body when the adapter was mounted to the camera. The Metabones was a major disappointment as I could see daylight all around the edges where the adapter was mounted to the lenses.

Tests were therefore performed with the Fotodiox as my interest was primarily center sharpness since I wasn't photographing flat objects at distance. 14X image magnification was used to insure critical sharpness with all exposures. (I've since ordered a Panasonic m43 to Leica R adapter as I've read that the quality is excellent. I own a Novoflex adapter for Samsung to Leica R lenses and the quality is exceptional.)

The 280 exhibited sharpness by f3.5 and the 400 by 4.0 with each teleconverter. Images became marginally sharper by 4.5.

As a lark I stacked both teleconverters. This was the biggest surprise. The 280 with stacked teleconverters provided an equivalent focal length of 1568mm. Sharpness was astounding at f3.5.

The 400 with stacked teleconverters provided sharp results by 4.5. Equivalent focal length was 2240mm. With the 1km distant subject the images were all soft due to heat waves... even at 22.2˚C ambient temperature. All images shot at the closer 30 meter distance were sharp by 3.5 with the 280 and 4.5 with the 400 and stacked APO teleconverters.

I repeated the test with a 4 second delay and IS "Off". In the EVF all vibration appeared to be perfectly settled by 4 seconds, but all images regardless of the chosen f stop were soft. None were critically sharp.

Most surprising was that with the 2 second delay and IS "On" there still appeared to be a bit of shake in the EVF with both lenses and stacked teleconverters... yet the images were very sharp.

The point is that if you want sharp images with "extreme" focal lengths leave the IS "On" when the lens is tripod mounted. And contrary to the nonsense about "lens adapters with no internal optics being equal... so why spend more on an expensive adapter" I've personally found that my Metabones m43 to Leica R adapter appeared to be built of heavier materials, but the machining was garbage and the Fotodiox was superior, though it still exhibited unacceptable slop in the front and back mounts.

There is no constant in terms of standards when sharpness is the issue being discussed. What is sharp to one person could be marginal to another. And so as to avoid any possible objections to a post featuring Leica optics bolted to an Olympus body please understand that this is all I had to work with. My interest in posting is to illustrate what my experience was with extreme focal lengths when IS was On vs Off.

A couple of samples of Hummingbirds in flight, with 100% crops, taken with the Leica 280 APO 2.8 + 1.4 APO TC on the EM5 Mk2 with Image Stabilization On (Rufous male Hummingbirds). This is a 782mm equivalent focal length and the images were shot at a distance of 8-9 feet, at an aperture of f9.5 :

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Joris

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Repeated the experiment with a Lumix GX80/85 with two different lenses (inside on stone floor, Manfrotto 190B tripod, 4 second shutter delay). Differences in lens qualities are obvious but no noticable differences between stabilizers off or on on either lens.
So changing my custom settings for on-tripod-use to stabilizer on seems the way to go, anticipating less stable soils and windy conditions.
 

Lawrence Beck

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Repeated the experiment with a Lumix GX80/85 with two different lenses (inside on stone floor, Manfrotto 190B tripod, 4 second shutter delay). Differences in lens qualities are obvious but no noticable differences between stabilizers off or on on either lens.
So changing my custom settings for on-tripod-use to stabilizer on seems the way to go, anticipating less stable soils and windy conditions.
Joris,
Which lenses were you using? Shorter focal length lenses with shutter speeds faster than 1/8 second won't necessarily show a difference between shots taken on or off a tripod.
 

Joris

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Lawrence, I compared my Panasonic Lumix kit lenses : 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 "mega OIS" at 32mm - f/5.6 - 1/3 sec and 35-100mm f/4-5.6 "mega OIS" at 35 mm - f5.6 - 1/3sec.
You might have a valid point though, I should repeat the test at yet lower shutter speeds.
 
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