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Leave your IS on

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by exekutive, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. exekutive

    exekutive Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Feb 8, 2017
    There are people spreading myths that if you're shooting from a tripod, you will get sharper photos by turning IS off. My testing shows that the opposite is true.

    OFF:
    ISoff.jpeg
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    ON:
    ISauto.jpeg
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    I have written an article about it here.

    I encourage everybody to to try it for themselves. (and share your results.)
     
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  2. What's your tripod like? That's an important variable. That said I've always left IBIS on for Olympus because half the time I'm shooting in wind and what not.
     
  3. exekutive

    exekutive Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Feb 8, 2017
    That's interesting. I know my M10.2 constantly hums, even with IS turned off or in review mode, so the sensor may be held in place with magnetic fields too.

    Tripod is just a plain telescopic aluminum one. I could try weighing it down next time.
     
  4. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    Thats been a internet can of worms for a long time, along with the dont use IS with fast shutter speeds, both need testing with your own set up.
     
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  5. The IBIS mechanism can't be 'parked' though, if it is disengaged completely the sensor goes free floating and is out of alignment. It has to remain powered and fixed in place the whole time.
     
  6. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    AFAIK, the latest Olympus bodies detect when the camera is tripod mounted and effectively turn IS off anyhow.
     
  7. exekutive

    exekutive Mu-43 Regular

    28
    Feb 8, 2017
    Where did you read that?
     
  8. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    Well, maybe I dreamed it. In any case, I never turn IBIS off when I use a tripod and I'm more than happy with sharpness even on very long exposures (30s or longer).
     
  9. PJ2

    PJ2 Mu-43 Regular Subscribing Member

    I think IBIS is switched off automatically when using bulb, timer and livecomp only. Like Paul, I leave IBIS on all the time otherwise.
     
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  10. speedy

    speedy Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Nov 27, 2015
    • Informative Informative x 1
  11. ArizonaMike

    ArizonaMike Mu-43 Top Veteran

    591
    Jan 19, 2018
    Arizona, USA
    As a former Canon user I might suggest that the Canon system is different from the Olympus system and advice from using one might not apply to the other.

    Almost all of my Canon lenses had IS and I always tried to remember to shut the IS off when the system was mounted and locked down on a tripod, although I left it on if the camera was free to swivel. The testing that I did showed that the IS would blur the photo if the camera was locked to the swivel head, but not if the swivel head was free to move, which is the way I used to use it when birding.

    However I do not think that the Canon experiment translates to the Olympus as I have done the same testing with it and not seen the same results. With the Olympus I generally leave the IS on all the time, tripod of not.
     
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  12. Drdave944

    Drdave944 Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Feb 2, 2012
    So it depends on the lens with Canon. However I once had a Canon 70 200 mm lens which lost the ability to focus sharply. They told me never to take the lens off without turning the IS button off. I don't see how this is bad,but If you accidentally removed the lens while the power is on the mechanism may be damaged and the lens become misaligned.I had to send lens to the factory.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
  13. ArizonaMike

    ArizonaMike Mu-43 Top Veteran

    591
    Jan 19, 2018
    Arizona, USA
    I have to say that I have never heard that before. Who was the "they" that told you this? Canon support? Your local photo store? Other users? Forum members?

    I am not suggesting that "they" are wrong, but I had Canon cameras, both crop and full-frame, for many years, along with perhaps 8 or 10 lenses, almost all with IS, and I never turned the IS button off when changing lenses, and never had that problem. Perhaps I was lucky, or perhaps the problem only exists with certain lenses, or perhaps it was an old problem that was fixed, or ...
     
  14. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jan 3, 2014
    Houston
    If your IS on image is sharper than your IS off image you either have a problem with your camera or your tripod is not as stable as you think.

    Yes it has been................your post makes the perfect launch pad for my reply.

    IS has a feedback loop and it is theoretically possible for the IS to cause problems when the camera is not moving as in on a “Steady” tripod. In the old days of IS this could cause problems and I saw evidence of it causing problems back in the dark ages. But IS has come a long way since the 90’s and in modern cameras/lenses I have not seen any problems with leaving it on. You do have to be careful with other systems that still have lenses with IS that were made in the 90’s because they could very well cause issues on a tripod because they are from as I said earlier “the dark ages”.

    As for fast shutter speeds it really is not needed for sharp photos. Although it could be helpful in some situations like panning. Now.........having the IS on does use up computing resources that could be used for the CAF system (which is the case with the original EM1), I am going on the fact that most times you use fast shutters speeds is for sports and you will be using CAF. Even knowing that I still keep it on in my EM1 because having the stablized view finder is more helpful than the small gain in CAF ability I would get turning it off.

    I have been an electronic tech for a long time (almost 30 years) and I was taught to always turn off power before removing some like a circuit card in a system. Why? Because there is a chance (very small but still a chance) that you could cause a spark or some other surge or something that could damage electronic circuits. I have always turned my camera off while when removing a lens because of this. Now......the chance of anything happening are very small, but I figure why take a chance when shutting the camera off is really not that hard.

    As for what you were told about turning IS off when removing the lens. If the camera is turned off there is no need to turn IS off because there is no power to cause any problems. If the camera is not off but you turn IS off, there is still power applied to the lens and turning IS off may prevent one potential problem but there is still power coming to other pins that could cause problems. So I would say turning off lens IS is not needed and will do you no good. You need to turn the cameras power off, not the IS.

    Not true but true.............they have refined the IS in modern cameras/lenses. Some systems are more advanced then others. Just like when it comes to CAF/Tracking, each company has their own algorithms and some are better than others. Olympus has some of the best IS on the market and their algorithms are pretty damn good as well as they have some very good gyros and they are good at detecting that there is no movement and don’t try to invent some like the older systems did.

    For the record. The system I was a technician on in the Navy used antennas that were roll stabilized to keep parallel to the horizon. So I do have a lot of experience with the same basic technology involved in cameras IS.
    Actually his problem stemmed from turnin the IS off. If he had kept it on the problem probably would never have showed itself. His problem was the elements that move for stabilization use magnets to keep it centered when the IS is off, pretty similar to what Olympus does with its IBIS. I have actually seen this phenomenon with my EM1 when waking the camera when I have my eye to the viewfinder. You can see the image jump and take a second to stabilize. It is why I don’t let my camera go to sleep when there is a chance I could need it for a surprise photograph. I just take extra batteries because walking around the swamp for 5-6 hours and never letting the camera sleep sucks up the juice.
     
  15. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jan 3, 2014
    Houston
    Actually, after reading that blog post about the Sigma lens, you could have fallen victim to that as well. What camera did you use for this test?
     
  16. Drdave944

    Drdave944 Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Feb 2, 2012
    I had never heard that either,but the Canon repair people said this when they returned my lens from being repaired.
     
  17. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    I have always ignored the turn is off thing before removing lenses, mainly because i forget but i have seen it on some lens instruction sheets but cant remember which.
     
  18. panamike

    panamike Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Jul 5, 2016
    Lincolnshire UK
    Thought i had seen it, this is a clip from the Sigma 150-600 C instructions

    Capturel.JPG
    Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)
     
  19. Fred S

    Fred S Mu-43 Top Veteran

    687
    Feb 20, 2012
    Calgary
    Fred S
    I always leave my IBIS ON
    Last year I used a heavy tripod , No wind and a remote shutter at stationary targets
    10 shots ON 10 shots OFF
    NO Difference with my EM 10 I ( 3 axis IBIS )
     
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