Label those Chargers

Ross the fiddler

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How do you determine this? Have you opened a battery or charger? Other method? Just curious.
The after market chargers only have two pins whereas the Olympus charger (& battery) have five pins. They have to legally abide with safety regulations on overcharging & overheating etc & that is why there are those extra connections. After market batteries have also been known to swell, probably from overheating during charging or worse, during use, making them hard to remove from the camera. As I said, I'll stick with Olympus batteries to be on the safe side. It was only when I first bought the E-M5 that Olympus was too slow to supply spare batteries at the time & so I went to the most reliable after market supplier at the time & those batteries (with chargers) are only used as a last resort back up. These after market manufacturers goods should not be allowed into country without the overcharging & overheating protection. Buy at your own risk!
 

Ross the fiddler

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dhazeghi

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I recently went traveling with a friend - between us we had 3 cameras and 3 chargers. Naturally, the airline lost the luggage which had the chargers, so we wound up getting a universal camera battery charger. It's definitely larger than the basic third-party ones, and it's a little bit fiddly, but it worked as advertised. Next time I'm just going to bring the one charger (and not put it in checked luggage).

Something like the DigiPower TC-U450.
 

PakkyT

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I have a small power cord where I simply went to the hardware store and bought a replacement lamp plug (a couple bucks), took one of those 6-foot long cords and cut of the end that goes to the wall so the cord is only about a foot then I put on the new lamp plug. So now I have a nice travel sized AC cord that is just long enough that I can plug it into a wall outlet and the charge sits on the ground under it. Those "duckbill" adapters are cool but sometimes they don't work because whatever you are plugging in might then cover up other outlets so you can only plug the one thing on. With the short cord I leave any other outlets un-obstructed.
 

oldracer

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... went to the hardware store ...
I did something similar. I bought three 2-wire extension cords, then cut and spliced (soldered) them so I have 9 outlets. It approaches overkill, but with two tablets or computers, two phones, and two or three camera battery chargers we can get pretty close to using it up. After a little surgery on the outlet blocks, I can insert 3-wire grounded plugs as well.

Since there's just a single plug to the wall, I only need one plug adapter when traveling outside North America. That's not a big deal with the European adapter shown, but the British inflicted some really large and clunky plugs on their colonies.
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The choice of red and white colors is deliberate to make it less easy to overlook when packing up in a hotel room.
 

PacNWMike

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travel kit:

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Ross the fiddler

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I did something similar. I bought three 2-wire extension cords, then cut and spliced (soldered) them so I have 9 outlets. It approaches overkill, but with two tablets or computers, two phones, and two or three camera battery chargers we can get pretty close to using it up. After a little surgery on the outlet blocks, I can insert 3-wire grounded plugs as well.

Since there's just a single plug to the wall, I only need one plug adapter when traveling outside North America. That's not a big deal with the European adapter shown, but the British inflicted some really large and clunky plugs on their colonies.
View attachment 104952
The choice of red and white colors is deliberate to make it less easy to overlook when packing up in a hotel room.
Heatshrink would have been a better & safer way to finish it though.
 

oldracer

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Heatshrink would have been a better & safer way to finish it though.
Ah, the internet. It's always amusing when the self-appointed experts show up. Pray tell, and given that you know absolutely nothing about the construction of the cord, how heat shrink would be "safer."

BTW, I probably have at least thirty feet of heat shrink in inventory in my shop.
 

Ross the fiddler

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Ah, the internet. It's always amusing when the self-appointed experts show up. Pray tell, and given that you know absolutely nothing about the construction of the cord, how heat shrink would be "safer."

BTW, I probably have at least thirty feet of heat shrink in inventory in my shop.
I'm glad I amused you but since you prayed that I would tell you, electrical tape as good as it is, is still using a sticky glue & on a constantly handled lead can become tacky over time & migrate; something that is not so desirable for mains voltages. My "self-appointed expert" method would be to use a small size tube on the individual (insulated) wires & an overall larger size self cementing one would be best to cover over the combined joins. BTW, I think these joins can be made safer by not making the active & neutral joins adjacent to each other but offset in the position along the lead (something you may have already done) & it also reduces the bulk in one position but will spread it out. Since you have to cut the lead the heat-shrink lengths can be slipped over the individual insulated wires & combined leads before soldering the wires with the resulting leads being neater & less likely fail. Electrical tape is good for those under car dash joins that won't be handled & not moved, but if keen, heat-shrink would work well there too.

We have a Safety Check, Test & Tag system here in Australia & that electrical tape repair would not pass OH&S safety standards as quoted from one source (PDF).
7.2.1.2 Visual inspection checklist
The visual inspection process should include a check for:
• Obvious damage, defects, make-shift repairs or modifications
Anyhow, I didn't intend to try & be an expert on anything but more concerned for safety when someone makes or modifies something that may be fine for their own use (more or less) & then shows it for others to see where it could become a less safe construction if attempted.

BTW, the power of the internet has me a little concerned at times too. Putting up photos of my dogs might also attract comments from certain dog breeders being critical of something they think they see without knowing the facts. But, I guess that's life (on the internet).
 
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oldracer

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Good response. Nice to see in this case that it is someone who actually knows what they are talking about.

I'm glad I amused you but since you prayed that I would tell you, electrical tape as good as it is, is still using a sticky glue & on a constantly handled lead can become tacky over time & migrate; something that is not so desirable for mains voltages. My "self-appointed expert" method would be to use a small size tube on the individual (insulated) wires & an overall larger size self cementing one would be best to cover over the combined joins.
Using heat shrink would have made the assembly larger due to the extra length needed to push the tubing away from the soldering heat . The joints are actually insulated with self-vulcanizing rubber tape. The red tape is more cosmetic than anything else; it is high-quality Scotch 35 and easily up to the minimal handling it will get on occasions when we are traveling..

... BTW, I think these joins can be made safer by not making the active & neutral joins adjacent to each other but offset in the position along the lead (something you may have already done) ...
Yes, that's why I did it that way. Re joint failure there are no strain loads on the joints; there are multiple tightly-clinched nylon tie-wraps that transfer strain around the joints on the uncut segments of wire.

...We have a Safety Check, Test & Tag system here in Australia & that electrical tape repair would not pass OH&S safety standards as quoted from one source (PDF).
Oh, this would never pass USA Underwriter's Laboratories either, the more fundamental reason is that there are too many outlets available, encouraging the ignorant to overload the single circuit it is connected to.

... more concerned for safety when someone makes or modifies something that may be fine for their own use (more or less) & then shows it for others to see where it could become a less safe construction if attempted.
Yes, I considered that before posting. But, really, there are so few Darwinian mechanisms still available for improving the species ...
 

Holoholo55

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I saw suggestions posted earlier for an alternative to those awkward, bulky AC cables that Olympus insists on packaging with their OMD chargers. Someone on the forums posted this suggestion and I bought some 3rd party versions off eBay. These were made for Apple MacBook AC adaptors but will fit the Olympus BLN1 chargers. Huge space savings when on the road.

They are called "duckheads" for whatever reason. The folding prongs are a key space-saving feature.

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Image borrowed from da Bay
 
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BAKatz

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For every camera I own, I purchase the Wasabi two battery kit and travel charger. Those chargers are more convenient than the ones supplied by the camera manufacture and I have yet to have trouble with them or as some have reported had them fail to charge the original factory battery. When not on the road with me these sit with one end up in a drawer. As such it is difficult to tell which charger is for which battery. So….. today I printed out some labels for them and ended that cornfusion.
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A word of caution regarding Wasabi batteries. I had a pair for a couple of years and loved them. Recently, I noticed they were both swollen in the middle. I didn't know what to make of it, so I tossed them. They wouldn't fit in the camera anyway. I don't know why they swelled, nor what it meant. I was concerned about them leaking or exploding. Just be aware of that issue.
 

Ross the fiddler

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A word of caution regarding Wasabi batteries. I had a pair for a couple of years and loved them. Recently, I noticed they were both swollen in the middle. I didn't know what to make of it, so I tossed them. They wouldn't fit in the camera anyway. I don't know why they swelled, nor what it meant. I was concerned about them leaking or exploding. Just be aware of that issue.
That is what can happen to them & could become embarrassing when they do that in the camera.
 

Carbonman

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Oh, this would never pass USA Underwriter's Laboratories either, the more fundamental reason is that there are too many outlets available, encouraging the ignorant to overload the single circuit it is connected to.
Soldered connections on 120VAC stranded wiring isn't National Electrical Code compliant either; cold welding or other pressure connections would meet standards but add bulk.
 

barry13

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A word of caution regarding Wasabi batteries. I had a pair for a couple of years and loved them. Recently, I noticed they were both swollen in the middle. I didn't know what to make of it, so I tossed them. They wouldn't fit in the camera anyway. I don't know why they swelled, nor what it meant. I was concerned about them leaking or exploding. Just be aware of that issue.
That is what can happen to them & could become embarrassing when they do that in the camera.
Hi, lithium batteries sometimes swell during charging (only), not during use. Overcharging makes it worse.

My first pair of Progos became swollen after over 1 year, but the price is so good compared to Oly that I bought another pair.

Barry
 

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