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Jupiter 9 85mm f2 mount

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by mbbinvt, May 27, 2012.

  1. mbbinvt

    mbbinvt Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Mar 28, 2012
    Does anyone know what kind of mount the Jupiter 9 85mm f2 has? I'm looking at one on eBay but the seller doesn't know the mount type. Also, can I get a cheapish apter to use it with my m4/3, or will I regret not buying an expensive one? Thank in advance for your reply.
     
  2. robertro

    robertro Mu-43 Veteran

    223
    Apr 22, 2010
    First off, this is a phenomenal lens - a copy of the pre-WW2 Zeiss Sonnar - well worth acquiring.

    There are four mounts that I am aware of:
    - M39 LTM rangefinder mount (needs M4/3-LTM adapter)
    - M39 Zenit mount (needs M4/3-M42 adapter plus M39-M42 thread adapter - pls verify this as I have not had this lens)
    - M42 Zenit mount (needs M4/3-M42 adapter)
    - Kiev 10/15 mount (forget about it!)

    The first three are screw-mount and easily adaptable to M4/3 (or NEX or Canon). I have not seen any benefit of expensive adapters versus cheap adapters, except for pride of ownership :)

    The last mount (Kiev) has no aperture control and a unique inner bayonet mount that has not been adapted to any camera AFAIK - to be avoided. You can identify it easily - it's the only J-9 with a bayonet mount.
     
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  3. mbbinvt

    mbbinvt Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Mar 28, 2012
    Thanks, Robertro! Didn't realize Jupiter was so all over the map with its mounts. Guess I'll have to find a vendor who knows what he's selling!
     
  4. mbbinvt

    mbbinvt Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Mar 28, 2012
    Too bad about the Kiev mount being something to avoid. Seems to be 2/3s of what's still for sale on eBay. Perhaps there's a reason for that!
     
  5. manzoid

    manzoid Mu-43 Regular

    137
    Jun 9, 2011
  6. wlewisiii

    wlewisiii Mu-43 Veteran

    238
    Dec 16, 2011
    Hayward, WI
    William Barnett-Lewis
    Get an adaptor and you'll be surprised. The Kiev (Contax RF mount, not 10/15 SLR) mount lenses are usually in much better condition as this was what the lenses were designed for by Zeiss before WWII. The Russians took the Contax factory back to Kiev & put it into production. The lenses were also modified for the other mounts as mentioned above but the Kiev was where they started. I really need to get another film Kiev again. Sweet cameras.

    If nothing else, avoid the LTM ones.
     
  7. mbbinvt

    mbbinvt Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Mar 28, 2012
    What's wrong with the LTM versions? Thanks for the historic details, by the way.
     
  8. wlewisiii

    wlewisiii Mu-43 Veteran

    238
    Dec 16, 2011
    Hayward, WI
    William Barnett-Lewis
    On film cameras, the focal length is slightly off between Contax Mount and LTM mount. The lens, in LTM, is also extremely complicated and easy to put together incorrectly. OTOH on the live focus screen of a digital you might well be able to see the focus well enough to make it work. In the old days (film) you couldn't tell if your lens back focused or front focused or was just a non-focusing POS until you had dunked that first roll.

    If you get a good one, it's glorious.

    2745503-R1-042-19A.

    This was a poor scan but it comes through I think. Kiev 4 with a Jupiter-9 85/2. Wide open at about 1/15th on BW400CN at EI400.
     
  9. the.growler

    the.growler Mu-43 Regular

    If you are planning on using the lens on a Micro 4/3 body, the M39 (rangefinder, i.e., FED-Zorki) mount is the most direct fit and uses the cheapest, thinnest and lightest adapter. I'm speaking from personal experience here, having owned pretty much every FSU lens that can (and some that can't) be adapted to a Micro 4/3 body.

    But, to the point raised by wlewisiii, this is a complicated lens that pushes the Sonnar design right to the edge of usability, given FSU manufacturing tolerances. There are four separate helices that have to be driven by the focus ring, plus a large objective lens, all packed into a thin-walled, flexible aluminum barrel. If you get a well-made, well-maintained example, it will become one of your favorite lenses - the combination of long focal length and wide aperture gives you really dramatic images. If you get a bad example, whether because of sloppy manufacturing, wear or poor maintenance, it will be unusable. Make sure you buy from a reputable seller who provides you with detailed answers to your questions about the condition of the lens.
     
  10. mbbinvt

    mbbinvt Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Mar 28, 2012
    Thanks for the insights, growler. I'm dealing with an eBay seller in Kiev and I'm not sure what to ask about condition since he says the lenses he is offering are in excellent condition,with no fungus, etc. He does fess up to some dust in the lenses but say it is par for the course with this age lenses. He also gives serial numbers of the leness. Is there a online database that would show whether the lenses came from a good lot? Seems a lot to ask, even in the Internet age!
     
  11. wlewisiii

    wlewisiii Mu-43 Veteran

    238
    Dec 16, 2011
    Hayward, WI
    William Barnett-Lewis
    Go to Fedka.com Fedka's the only seller I'd buy FSU gear from anymore. His prices are a bit higher than you might pay playing ebay roulette, but he's in NYC so shipping doesn't take forever & he guarantees his gear.

    Get the LTM version from him & you'll be fine. There are a huge number of good & a small number of great lenses that came out of the old Soviet Union. They can still be a whole lot of fun on a :43: camera. Look for a Industar 61L/D (55/2.8) & a Jupiter 8 (50/2) someday as well. Or if you feel lucky, a good Jupiter 3 (50/1.5) is as good as it gets but it's often harder to find a nice one than a Jupiter 9.
     
  12. the.growler

    the.growler Mu-43 Regular

    There's no direct correlation between serial numbers and quality, other than a general belief that bare aluminum lenses (1950s and 1960s) were manufactured to slightly higher standards than the later black-finished lenses (1970s on). But I've never seen anybody test this belief against a statistically significant sample of lenses. Also, FSU lens production was frequently shared between multiple factories where serial number application varied.

    BTW, I've never seen any documentation to back up the oft-repeated claim that serial numbers starting with multiple zeros were specially-made to higher standards for Communist Party officials. Don't pay extra for a lens just on account of its serial number.
     
  13. robertro

    robertro Mu-43 Veteran

    223
    Apr 22, 2010
    For these lenses, especially the older LTM (silver) ones, you have to be very careful about how they've been treated, whether they've been rebuilt, etc...

    To a digital camera user that is relying on manual focus through the viewfinder or LCD (rather than a rangefinder user who relies on manual couplings for focus accuracy), all that's really important to you is whether the glass is relatively unmarked, the coatings are intact, and that the focus and aperture work very smoothly throughout their ranges.

    IMO, you are more likely to get that from the more recent (black M42) models, simply because they have lived for a shorter time. I have both an LTM M39 silver J-9 and a 1980s vintage M42 black lens, and I'd be lying if I said there was a noticable difference. The silver one is a bit less smooth in focus (dried lubricant?) and has different color coatings (I assume single rather than multi-coated). The silver one gets more attention in public.

    BTW, I had missed the Kiev/Contax mount in my initial list - this is different from the Kiev 10/15 that I had described.

    Check the seller's eBay feedback on similar items if you are unsure, and remember that these are 30-50 year old items, so if all you get is some dust, consider yourself lucky!