JPEG settings request from a RAW guy

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by hypervel, Sep 8, 2011.

  1. hypervel

    hypervel Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 30, 2011
    Not much time to write at the moment.......
    I shoot RAW, but note in the GH2 manual quite a few instances that force me into JPEG shooting. While I fully intend to shoot mostly RAW, I'd appreciate some suggestions on what in-cam settings are good to get OOC as close as possible to what I'd try to pull from RAW.
    I tend to increase saturation and sharpness in RAW, also bumping down exposure as I shoot to the right a bit.
    Exposure, lightly enhanced color, and best possible sharpness is my goal with RAW, I'm hoping to get close with JPEG.
    Any hard-fought-and-won suggestions that can minimize my trial and error time is greatly appreciated.
    M43 is new to me, and going Panasonic, JPEG etc is a little outside my comfort zone.....coming from Ca***....and that whole mind set.
  2. fredlong

    fredlong Just this guy...

    Apr 18, 2011
    Massachusetts USA
    Real Name:
    The settings you want are in the film modes. I would shoot a typical scene using each of the film modes. Decide which is closest to what you want. For each film mode you can adjust contrast, sharpness, saturation and noise reduction. Up to +2 or -2 from the default.

    If I shoot jpegs with my G2 I use vivid, -2 contrast, 0 sharpness, -2 contrast, -2 noise reduction. It seems counter-intuitive to start from a base of more saturation and contrast than I want but it just worked out that way to get the color "right"

    • Like Like x 1
  3. mzd

    mzd Mu-43 Veteran

    Nov 30, 2010
    I recently needed to shoot JPEG (+RAW) for a friends wedding since I wanted to give them pictures asap. I don't typically shoot JPEG so I looked at some various setting advice on other threads here. I ended up going with pjohngren's suggestions (here). This was on a GF1 btw.
    Film mode: Dynamic
    Contrast: -1
    Saturation: +1
    Noise Reduction: -1
    Sharpening: +1

    Overall I was happy with the results. Some of the shots were a little dark (the wedding took place under a tent so the lighting was a little difficult). But the color and skin tones outside in better light (overcast day) were great. I wasn't the main photographer or anything, just a friend with a camera.
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  4. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    You can also adjust exposure if you like to shoot to the right. I shoot Olympus and not Panasonic, so I can't give you the exact menu option, but you should be able to give the camera a bias to underexpose or overexpose.
    • Like Like x 1
  5. shnitz

    shnitz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Aug 25, 2011
    Austin, TX
    If you don't mind me asking, what settings are forcing you into JPEG? Is it shooting stills during video?

    Really, you have to adjust the settings to your liking. There is no one "correct" setting; otherwise there wouldn't be a choice to adjust it! Really, just set up a quick still-life scene outside on a porch table, with plants in the background. Put up a variety of objects, with different colors and textures. Set your camera on a tripod, set everything to default, and adjust one setting at a time. Take 5-10 pictures at a different sharpness setting, and then set sharpness back to default. Then, take 5-10 pictures at different saturation settings, then turn it back to normal. Load the 20 pictures on your computer, take a quick look, and see which of each setting you like. Should take less than 40 minutes.

    If you want a quick answer, then I would bump sharpness and saturation up to 2/3 of the way to the right. However, this is only what I assume you'd like. No one can know this but you.
    • Like Like x 1
  6. hypervel

    hypervel Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 30, 2011
    "Simple" baffles me as a general rule.

    @schnitz- Firstly, beg pardon if I get off base. I am only reading the manual, camera is on it's way. The EX setting, some fast frame rate settings, AND a wish to exercise a muscle I'm no longer used to using-JPEG. Given that each camera is a little different, I figured to ask the questions from current users before I go off half cocked on a pic shooting spree. Time is rather a limited commodity for me. I appreciate everybody's help.
    (I know just what to do with a 50D--I mean, aside for using it as a steam ship anchor....)
    Also, I noted a very strange commitment by so many folks on this forum to shoot OOC JPEG. Still baffled by the desire to do so voluntarily, but game to try. Maybe things have improved over the years for in-cam file handling. I wouldn't mind a simpler - ah- workflow.
    SEVERAL red pill variety awakenings culminated in my move to m43. I don't need 300 full RAW pics loaded on my machine...every time I shoot. I don't need more than about 8x10 photo output. Seems ludicrous to bother with RAW 100% of the time if I can catch 6MP snappies at a quality level I might reasonably equate to a high level of comparative quality to one of my processed RAW files.
    *toes the sand....* and I'll be asking this camera if it will come close to sports and BIF action. I know, I know. BUT! I really figure the next gen or two of bodies will work around weaknesses compared to DSLR's. Focus has come a long way baby! All in what-3 years? I dare Canonikon to bring that performance advancement rate to the market!

    If anybody was RAW processing a 50D file in LR, I could rattle off some parameters that I have found to be constant and satisfactory settings. That's what I am looking (and finding) for in camera settings from folks who already know what works for them.
    Thanks to all.
  7. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    The Panasonic JPG engine is VERY tunable. If you are using the same settings over and over in your RAW developer, I see no reason why not to load those settings into the JPG engine and use a processor designed and dedicated to that specifc task to do the work.

    At the end of the day, you're still developing the RAW image - just in-camera vs. in-computer.

    Do a search for "jpeg engine settings". I started a thread where I was summarizing everyone's settings. I ended up using pjohngren's settings.

    NOTE: you can tweak both the Film Mode AND the White Balance settings separately - many of the suggestions use both tweaks. Most of those tweaks were designed for the -1 series cameras, your GH2 might be different. My new G3 certainly is!
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  8. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Real Name:
    I was beginning to tinker with the in camera jpeg setting on my GF1 so this thread (with link to previous similar thread) has come at just the right moment.

    Cheers lads.
    • Like Like x 1
  9. hypervel

    hypervel Mu-43 Regular

    Aug 30, 2011
    TC hit it:
    "G3 Heads to Alaska" and "JPG Engine Settings" on search is a really good set of information. This is the kind of info that deserves distillation and sticky status in my opinion. Thanks, pjohngren!!!
    I should have the GH2 and 20 1.7/14-140 soon, in time for a parade, some soccer, and a State Fair. There are a couple m42's coming along as well....not getting my hopes up on them yet. Anyhow, I look forward to compare and contrast against last year's 50D shots.
  10. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Real Name:
    If I were to make various in camera adjustments, for example switched to VIVID...tweaked White Balance a little, perhaps reduced saturation and NR a little as well......

    Is it JUST the out of camera jpeg that is effected or does the RAW file change too??

    I ask because I am now shooting RAW+FINEjpeg. The jpegs will be my 'go to' galleries for everyday perusal and sharing of photos with family and friends (on disk, email, facebook etc) but I want my RAW files for those shots that I want to work on for my own gallery/archives for printing etc.
  11. CityFox

    CityFox New to Mu-43

    Aug 7, 2011
    London E16
    I also use Vibrant as base

    Having recently acquired a S/H GH2 after years of using Olympus DSLR's I was initially unimpressed with the GH2 JPEGS.

    After some research and experimentation I have come up with the following settings which seem give me excellent results in most situations. ie good skin tones, accurate blue sky,and reds.

    Contrast -2
    Saturation -2
    Sharpness 0
    NR -1
    AWB two clicks towards yellow

    Then in Lightroom I may boost the image with the clarity slider and for grass & foliage reduce the hue and saturation of the greens slightly as they are overcooked in vibrant, (nature is better for greens)
    • Like Like x 1
  12. sashu1

    sashu1 Mu-43 Rookie

    Sep 10, 2011
    Melbourne Australia
    Hi Livnius,

    The JPEG settings do not affect RAW files but they do affect the preview thumbnail of the RAW file as it uses a small JPEG image, so if you have JPEG set to B and W, your RAW file preview will appear B and W until in LR a new preview is generated by LR. There are many advantages for in camera JPEGS - they are quickly available and shared, they are smaller size taking up less disk space and processing power. Shooting to the right only applies if you do not want to do any post-processing. If you are after the files straight out of camera, then your exposure has to be spot on and if you are shooting RAW+JPEG this can sometimes influence the way you record the RAW file and the "headroom" in post processing of RAW files. The JPEG in camera also allows one very important advantage - most manufacturers correct lens distortion and other aberrations in JPEG conversion. Just try some of your wide-angle lenses in RAW and JPEG and you will see the difference.
    JPEG requires some work to get the settings right in the camera - namely white balance, saturation, contrast and noise reduction. Some cameras also over or underhsharpen.
  13. Livnius

    Livnius Super Moderator

    Jul 7, 2011
    Melbourne. Australia
    Real Name:

    I think I'll try out some of the settings as recommended on the forum. I'd be curious to see just how much I can improve the OOC jpegs with a bit of simple in camera tweaking.