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ISO and flash photography on the EM-1

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by curtisls87, Sep 11, 2013.

  1. curtisls87

    curtisls87 Mu-43 Regular

    78
    Jan 7, 2010
    Los Gatos, CA, USA
    Curt Schimmels
    On a couple of other sites, I've seen a comment or two by "pros" stating that the lack of a native ISO 100 would be a dealbreaker for flash photography in their studio. What I haven't seen is an explanation of why. I'm not a pro, so, can anyone explain why this might be the case? My curiosity has gotten the better of me.
     
  2. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    This "pro" is probably thinking that they would have to adjust their f/stop to compensate for the one stop gain of ISO (reducing the blurring of the background), but they probably aren't thinking that they could adjust their strobes by one stop (either by turning down power or moving the strobes back from the subject).

    And this is not an Olympus-only concern...I know many Nikon cameras don't have ISO100.
     
  3. darosk

    darosk Mu-43 Top Veteran

    705
    Apr 17, 2013
    Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
    Daros
    'Dealbreaker'? Really? Sheesh - there's just no pleasing some people.

    Somewhat related, I didn't realize the sync speed for the EM-1 is 1/320th. That's nice.
     
  4. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    1/320th is only with TTL flashes...most likely real world non-TTL would be closer to 1/180th when you consider the triggering method and using older flashes.
     
  5. darosk

    darosk Mu-43 Top Veteran

    705
    Apr 17, 2013
    Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
    Daros
    I use manual flashes on my E-M5 and phottix stratos and I'm shooting 1/250th all day long. As long as the batteries have juice I haven't gotten any issues with black bars.
     
  6. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    Yeah, what Olympus lists for X-sync speed works fine for manual flash, like 1/250s on the OM-D E-M5 or 1/180s on the Pens. In fact, most of the times you can even go a little faster though that is never suggested. If you accidentally drop to 1/250s on a Pen for instance, it's highly doubtful that you'll notice the shadow of the curtain.
     
  7. Al.

    Al. Mu-43 Veteran

    372
    Jul 3, 2010
    Hull, East Yorkshire, UK
    Alan
    Problem is with studio flash even turning down the power I still get readings of f 16 and f 22, and that is not ideal with refraction on micro four third lenses, so a low iso brings down the f stop . Flash sync speed makes no difference to the exposure
     
  8. curtisls87

    curtisls87 Mu-43 Regular

    78
    Jan 7, 2010
    Los Gatos, CA, USA
    Curt Schimmels
    If I understand correctly, it seems odd to me that using flash, one wouldn't be able to select any aperture they wanted. Wouldn't the flash(es) compensate?

    Again, this is not my forte, but I am genuinely interested.
     
  9. darosk

    darosk Mu-43 Top Veteran

    705
    Apr 17, 2013
    Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia
    Daros
    No, of course x-sync doesn't affect flash exposure, I was just making a comment on the faster speed compared to other Oly bodies. I only use speedlights so I don't have any problems with dialing down the power.

    I shoot with all flashes and camera settings on manual to get consistent results. To be honest I've never even considered using any TTL or auto modes in studio.
     
  10. Ned

    Ned Mu-43 Legend

    Jul 18, 2010
    Alberta, Canada
    How does flash sync speed not make a difference? You're complaining about stopping down too much, but the faster your shutter speed the less you have to stop down your aperture to achieve the same exposure... same thing a lower ISO will do for you.
     
  11. Al.

    Al. Mu-43 Veteran

    372
    Jul 3, 2010
    Hull, East Yorkshire, UK
    Alan
    If I go at my max sync speed 1/180th at base iso and getting high readings why would I use a slower shutter speed ?
     
  12. Mikefellh

    Mikefellh Mu-43 Top Veteran

    939
    Jun 7, 2012
    Toronto, Canada
    Then you go buy a lower power strobe, or get a diffusor for the strobe. Recently got some lower power strobes and it's a big improvement.


    You're talking about TTL flashes that communicate with the camera...studio flashes are typicaly manual flashes that only responds to FIRE! You set the power level of the manual flash like a dimmer, then use a flash meter to measure the output of the flash. You have to use your camera in MANUAL mode, setting the shutter speed to sync speed or slower, and set the aperture based on what the flash meter tells you.

    You can if you want operate your TTL flash in manual mode and set the power level yourself.


    In flash photography aperture controls your flash exposure, and shutter speed controls your ambient (yes, I know aperture also controls ambient, but we're talking a flash shoot here).

    If there is NO ambient light (a totally blackened room) and you do a flash picture, it makes NO DIFFERENCE if you do a 1/250 f/8 flash exposure, or a 1 second f/8 flash exposure (except for any hot pixels of course).

    Now if there was ambient light, that's a different story. In fact with a longer exposure you can do special effects where you have a moving subject frozen, and then blurred in the same image. This is called "dragging the shutter".