Is there such a thing......?

StephenL

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.... as a legacy 9,10, or 11mm lens which will adapt for m4/3?

I have the Micro 9-18, which is good, but when I shoot wide I often want a wider maximum aperture than f4. And what I call wide, is less than 11mm. OK, 12mm at a push.

Oh, and I'd like it to be affordable, too! :rofl:
 

StephenL

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I've seen a few Schneider 10mm lenses intended for cine use on Ebay. Don't know how viable they would be or indeed if converter mounts are available for Arri-type lenses.
 

Iconindustries

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No it wouldn't; it would have to be 10mm. A lens' focal length doesn't change just because it's on a different camera.
m4/3 creates a 2x mulitplier so essentially a 20mm becomes a 40mm in 35mm terms. I'm no expert and I stand to be corrected but that's what I've always understood. My Nikon DX format has got a multiplier of approx. 1.5x

icon
 

carpandean

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I assume that you don't want a fisheye lens, right? There are several 10-XXmm zooms that start at f3.5. Not a big improvement of f4, but it's something. Olympus has an 11-22mm that starts at f2.8. Tokina (no idea about quality) makes an 11-16mm/f2.8 for Nikon and Canon.
 

WT21

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Having looked around myself, I'd say the Panny 7-14 is the widest, fastest, lightest lens you'll find for m43. Remember, on FF the typical most-wide lens you find is about 14-15mm, and that's often a fisheye (though I think Canon has a non-fisheye 14 or 15mm). On crop, it's about 10mm, but that's equivalent to about 15-16mm. None of these that I remember are faster than 4.0 or maybe 3.5. I think Sigma has an 8mm zoom. Can't remember if it's fisheye or not, but I don't think it's 2.8.

There's a legacy Russian lens that starts at 2.8, but I understand it's lousy at that aperture, so what's the point? The immortal Ken Rockwell even spun it as a positive calling it "bonus soft focus effect at 2.8" lol.

Good luck in your search, but I think the best trade-off right now for m43 is the Oly if cost is an issue, and the Panny if you need the widest angle possible. From what I found, I don't think there are many better options than those at this time, and that Panny in itself is really a pretty darn wide lens in the entire pantheon of all interchangeable lens cameras. I'm not sure there's anything wider amongst any of the standard camera makers outside of cine and CCTV (a c-mount lenses tend to vignette on m43 at those focal lengths).

Enough rambling. I've rewritten this post already three times. I hope something here is helpful :)
 

tamoio

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There are a few fantastically expensive 35mm cinema lenses from Zeiss around 10mm that will cover 4/3 and can be adapted for another couple hundred dollars. The Olympus 11-22mm 4/3 is an alternative that will actually AF (sluggish) on an Olympus pen body and it can be found for about 1/2 the price of the Panasonic 7-14mm. None of the 16mm cinema wideangles that I'm familiar with will cover the 4/3 sensor, this includes the angenieux 10mm, the Zeiss 8mm, the Kinoptik 5.6mm (!).
 

Amin Sabet

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Bill, a 9mm adapted lens (regardless of what system it comes from originally) will give the same angle of view as his native mZD lens at 9mm, so long as it covers the sensor.

Other than the regular 4/3 lenses like the 11-22 as Tamoio mentioned, I haven't seen any adapted lenses wider than 12mm which cover the whole sensor and give good edge performance.
 

Amin Sabet

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m4/3 creates a 2x mulitplier so essentially a 20mm becomes a 40mm in 35mm terms. I'm no expert and I stand to be corrected but that's what I've always understood. My Nikon DX format has got a multiplier of approx. 1.5x

icon
Icon, a 20mm lens on a MFT camera provides the same angle of view as a 40mm lens on a 35mm format camera. However, a 20mm native MFT lens on a MFT provides the same angle of view as a 20mm adapted 35mm format lens (or any other 20mm lens which covers the sensor) on a MFT camera. Since the OP is talking about mounting the adapted lens on a MFT camera, there's no need to apply a multiplier in comparing it to a native MFT lens.
 

Iconindustries

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Icon, a 20mm lens on a MFT camera provides the same angle of view as a 40mm lens on a 35mm format camera. However, a 20mm native MFT lens on a MFT provides the same angle of view as a 20mm adapted 35mm format lens (or any other 20mm lens which covers the sensor) on a MFT camera. Since the OP is talking about mounting the adapted lens on a MFT camera, there's no need to apply a multiplier in comparing it to a native MFT lens.
Thanks Amin. I'm very close I think to understanding what you are saying but when I think I've worked it out, it's like my fingers lose grip and I fall back down.

If i put my native 20mm lens on a 35mm format camera (in theory) will it always be 20mm or does it make it 10mm angle of view.

I think I might need to find that thread that was going around a bit earlier. I had no need to understand it back then but now my curiosity wants to understand it.
 

starlabs

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Think of it as a multiplier.

35mm = 1x
m43 = 2x

35mm = 1x 20mm = effective 20mm
m43 = 2x 20mm = effective 40mm

Let's say you had a Canon T2i as well... the crop factor is 1.6 I believe (thus, 1.6x multiplier):

T2i = 1.6 x 20mm = effective 32mm
 

Iconindustries

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Think of it as a multiplier.

35mm = 1x
m43 = 2x

35mm = 1x 20mm = effective 20mm
m43 = 2x 20mm = effective 40mm

Let's say you had a Canon T2i as well... the crop factor is 1.6 I believe (thus, 1.6x multiplier):

T2i = 1.6 x 20mm = effective 32mm
Yep, Now i think i've gripped the edge of the wall and I'm pulling myself up onto it. So if Joe Brown had a 40mm lens that he had to photograph Noah's Ark and he loved it's field of view so he kept it in the cupboard. Now he's bought himself a m43 camera and put it on the front and now as he goes to take a picture it will be a different field of view as to what he saw when photographing Noah's Ark. It's still a 40mm lens but it now it has the same field of view as if he photographed Noah's Ark with an 80mm lens.

Have I successfully pulled myself onto the wall, Starlabs?
 

StephenL

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To qualify my original question, yes I do mean an actual 10mm. To give me a FOV equivalent of 20mm on m4/3.

Looks like I'll have to stick with my 9-18 or get a 7-14. Pity they don't have wider apertures, but as has been said, that would up the cost significantly, even if one were available!
 
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