Is the hood for the 43s' 12-60mm SWD risky for the front element?

zensu

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Recently acquired a used Olympus 12-60mm SWD 43s' zoom lens in excellent condition. Was reading up on the many post and blogs about this great optic and ran across a post (Don't remember where) that said some overzealous photographers had accidently pulled the front element loose by removing the lens hood for this optic. I've removed the hood for reverse storage and I admit this hood is the most difficult to remove when mounted in shooting position. Taking it off in the storage position is much easier as the shooting position clicks into place on the front of the lens. I'm hoping someone can shed some light on the truth about this post.
Thanks to all,
Bobby:coffee-30:
 

Wisertime

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Got this tip from another site way back when I had this lens. Rub some pencil graphite on the inside of the lens hood rim and that will lubricate it some. Never had an issue, bit it's a tad tight for sure. Might matter where you are holding the lens when twisting off too (I probably would not twist it while holding the camera by the grip if it's tight.)...but if you are careful there should be no worries.
 

Tilman Paulin

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Mine varies depending on circumstances (I suspect humidity plays a big part).
Sometimes it gets extremely sticky (in humid conditions) and sometimes it's almost too loose.
Definitely not an ideal solution that hood - and it's worth keeping it clean of dust/debris (I'm using a cheap toothbrush to clean out the rim every once in a while)

The only really stuck lens hood I had was with the 14-54mm at the beach, when a grain of sand ended up between hood and lens.
The cameras and lenses are dust and weather-sealed - yet there are still areas that can trip you up :)
 

zensu

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I've been experimenting myself and discovered on my copy of the 12-60 SWD that if I grasp both sides of the hood (the smaller petals on left and right side) and squeeze gently I can feel the hood actually loosen up a bit and come off much easier. It's almost as if I can feel the hood release its grip a little. I hope other 12-60 SWD owners will try this out and post their opinions about this.
Bobby :coffee-30:
 

PakkyT

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I use Silicone spray for mine. I take the hood down to the basement (and leave the lens upstairs far away). I spray a paper towel with the silicone spray then use the paper town to wipe down the grooves of the hood that connect with the lens. Buttery smooth.

And yes, every year or so it starts to get a little stiff getting the hood off (and if you let it get too friction-y it will act as a wrench and break the front plastic bezel off the front of this lens which is only held in place by a trio of plastic pins) and I repeat the process.
 
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PacNWMike

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I just wipe the "threads" or whatever you call them on both lens and hood with a cotton handkerchief every now and then. Keep 'em clean. nose grease works in the field
 

zensu

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Thanks to all who replied. I will try out the silicon spray on a paper towel technique first and if that doesn't work satisfactorily I'll try out the graphite. The only reason I choose that order is that I don't know how you'd apply graphite to the hoods mounting ring without making a bit of a mess.
Thanks,
Bobby :coffee-30:
 
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zensu

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I use Silicone spray for mine. I take the hood down to the basement (and leave the lens upstairs far away). I spray a paper towel with the silicone spray then use the paper town to wipe down the grooves of the hood that connect with the lens. Buttery smooth.

And yes, every year or so it starts to get a little stiff getting the hood off (and if you let it get too friction-y it will act as a wrench and break the front plastic bezel off the front of this lens which is only held in place by a trio of plastic pins) and I repeat the process.
A trio of plastic pins sounds like the rear mount of the m43s' 12-40mm Pro lens.
Bobby :coffee-30:
 

oldracer

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I'm not hampered by any direct knowledge of this lens, but in reading the thread out of curiosity I see "silicone" and "graphite." Personally I would not use either because both have the possibility of migrating and contaminating lenses or sensors.

For filter rings, my best solution has been a dry moly lube. This stuff is water-thin and dries to a light grey film. I apply it with a tiny artist's brush. Mine came from Brownell's (Smooth-Kote, 1/2 oz. : DRY FILM LUBRICANTS | Brownells) but I see that they now list it as disco. Probably you can get it from other sources or from the manufacturer.

If this is one of those bayonet/click-mount type hoods, I might pull out my needle file set and some 400 or finer grit sandpaper and attempt to relieve the tight spots. For me, getting the correct functioning trumps cosmetic beauty but YMMV.

Edit: I would carefully test before using the dry moly on plastic, since it is solvent-based.
 
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PakkyT

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in reading the thread out of curiosity I see "silicone" and "graphite." Personally I would not use either because both have the possibility of migrating and contaminating lenses or sensors.
Edit: I would carefully test before using the dry moly on plastic, since it is solvent-based.
Classic post! Not trying to make fun of you. Ok maybe a little ;) , but I mean it in good fun, not to be mean.

First poo poo other ideas because they are not yours or you have no familiarity with them, then suggest something you have used but have no proof that it is any better than previously mentioned ideas. And to top it off post a warning at the end that your idea may actually be worse for the application we are talking about.

;) who doesn't love the internet, eh?
 
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oldracer

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... poo poo other ideas because they are not yours or you have no familiarity with them ...
Not to start a flame war, but I have used both graphite and silicone for years -- in applications they are suited for. Graphite is tiny particles or flakes and does not really adhere to the surfaces where it is applied. It is great for many things including for locks subject to low temperatures where greases or oils may get stiff. It is not a substance that I want wandering around my cameras waiting to add particles to my sensor surfaces. Silicone grease hardening time is measured in years and it is notoriously difficult to remove from surfaces where it is not wanted. It is not a substance that I want wandering around my cameras waiting to get on a front or rear lens element. I have ample quantities of both products in my shop supplies and use both in applications where they are the right choice. I am "poo-pooing" them for this application because my years of familiarity with them tell me that using them in this application is A Bad Idea.

I have used moly (molybdenum disulphide) for years in such products as racing engine assembly lubricants and pistol action lubes. My experience with dry moly is less extensive but has been very positive. Dry moly is actually a particulate as well, but the vendor's product includes a binder that, after curing, appears to create a moly-impregnated film that does a great job on my filter threads and shows absolutely no sign of coming off. I would be very confident in using it anywhere on my cameras.

... to top it off post a warning at the end that your idea may actually be worse for the application we are talking about.
You'll note that was an edit. After posting it occurred to me that I had only used the product on metal. The only reason I posted, since I don't know the lens hood in question, is that I think graphite and silicone are both terrible choices for use anywhere on a camera except possibly, for silicone, internally where a user's fingers are not expected to venture. IF the item is plastic, as you imply, then the dry moly solvent MAY be an issue. I thought I should mention that.

Also in good fun, of course, do you have a permit from the Thread Police that allows you to post insults and cheap shots?
 

Ross the fiddler

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Thanks to all who replied. I will try out the silicon spray on a paper towel technique first and if that doesn't work satisfactorily I'll try out the graphite. The only reason I choose that order is that I don't know how you'd apply graphite to the hoods mounting ring without making a bit of a mess.
Thanks,
Bobby :coffee-30:
Maybe not too many use a pencil these days but it used to be an everyday item & does the job quite nicely. There is no reason that after applying pencil lead (graphite really) that silicon oil could be applied over the top. After all, graphite grease (combined) & especially molybdenum grease work well in other applications at lubricating & staying for longer (in my case, on violin bow screws & fine tuning adjustment screws on the instruments), so the graphite & silicon oil would remain for longer, but it must be a minimal amount though to prevent it getting to unintended places.

EDIT: personally, I prefer to stay away from greases & just use that slight amount of dry lubricant from the pencil as it is such small amounts of graphite that it is unlikely to ever cause a problem unlike puffing graphite powder might. Also, any excess should be blown & cleaned away (not near the open sensor of the camera).
 
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J

Jfrader

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... but the latter just grosses me out!
Field expedient. You've apparently not had the pleasure of dealing with minor repairs while dangling from a belay line at 14k feet. :)

You do realize I'm talking about the skin oil on the outside of the nose, not what is inside?
 

Ross the fiddler

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Field expedient. You've apparently not had the pleasure of dealing with minor repairs while dangling from a belay line at 14k feet. :)

You do realize I'm talking about the skin oil on the outside of the nose, not what is inside?
Yes, I know, but it still grosses me out, even if it is quite effective. :eek: I wonder if ear wax would help on car battery terminals. ;)
 

zensu

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I really do appreciate all the replies, you've all given me some things to think about. Before I retired I worked as a Draftsman for 40+ years and still have my old "Fugle" brass lead holders with graphite which are worth their weight in gold as far as drawing is concerned. I'll have to check which leads are still in my holders but I used to keep 3 different Fugles' with 3 different leads (they are graphite but we still called them leads) each a different degree of hardness for specific lines. The softer leads for broader lines and the harder leads for very fine lines. I'm thing a good medium hardness lead might do the trick.
Bobby :coffee-30:
 
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