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Is that fungus on my 14mm and 20mm lense?

Discussion in 'Panasonic Cameras' started by rossi46, Nov 6, 2012.

  1. rossi46

    rossi46 Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 1, 2012
    Hi All,

    Does this look like fungus, or its just greasy or dusty?
    I had taken this photo at night, with light source shining indirectly from behind the lense.

    First picture - my 14 mm F2.5 lense
    Second picture my 14 mm F2.5 lens, doesn't this second picture look very blurry?

    Third picture - my 20mm F1.7 lens.

    All of these photo are taken handheld, with me holding the lense and the camera. Used 20mm lens to snap photo of 14mm lens, vice versa.
     

    Attached Files:

  2. addieleman

    addieleman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 5, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Ad
    A bit difficult to see, but yes, it looks like fungus. Do you store the lenses in a relatively humid place?

    If you're lucky the fungus can go away by storing the lenses in a less humid place, one lens of mine lost almost all visible traces after a year or so at home.
     
  3. rossi46

    rossi46 Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 1, 2012
    I store my lens in air conditioned room. Air Cond is switched on about 3 to 4 hours every night. I got a cheap humidity reader, the RH when air cond is switched on, drops to about 45 to 55 % RH. Then it the day time it goes up to 65% to 70%RH.
    Sometimes when the humidity is low, I close it in air tight container.
     
  4. addieleman

    addieleman Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 5, 2010
    The Netherlands
    Ad
    I've read somewhere that RH should stay below 70 % to prevent fungus developing, which you do apparently. If you store the lens in the airtight container while it's hot and not so humid, you may end up with too much humidity in the container when the temperature drops and consequently relative humidity rises. Moreover, I've learnt that water vapour can transgress a lot of barriers like rubber seals etc.

    That's as far as my knowledge goes. Maybe more knowledgeable people can chime in?
     
  5. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    Too blurry to tell for me.
     
  6. rossi46

    rossi46 Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 1, 2012
    Thanks for that anyway.
    What I have noticed is that, when I am storing it this way -
    1. Air Cond switched on at night, just before i sleep when humidity is lower, I close the air tight container, the RH is usually about 45 - 52% RH
    2. By the time I wake up in the morning, I check the thermohydrograpyh, it usually increases the RH % by about 2 %.
    3. When I come back at night, I open up the air tight box for ventaliation and another round of "air cond" treatment.
    A thing I had noticed is that once I re-open the air-tight box, then Humidity will go up to 60% to 70% RH.
    Thus, I believe that the humidity level inside the air-tight box is lower than ambient temperature and humidity.


    I am using this natural air cond method because of my extremely hot climate, I can never sleep without air-cond.
     
  7. rossi46

    rossi46 Mu-43 Regular

    141
    Mar 1, 2012
    Hi Lenshorder,

    here's two more photos of my lense, think it is sharper now. I am resting the lense on a box and rest my camera on something (instead of using my own hands for both, and took the picture with timer set to avoid camera shake.


    First photo is 14mm lens, second photo is 20mm f1.7 lens.
     

    Attached Files:

  8. Cruzan80

    Cruzan80 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 23, 2012
    Denver, Co
    Sean Rastsmith
    Dessicant is a wonderful thing. Those little packages in electronics and shoe boxes that say Do Not Eat. Used to keeping humidity low. They sell it online as well. Maybe put some in the box to help?
     
  9. D@ne

    D@ne Mu-43 Top Veteran

    593
    Feb 23, 2012
    Toronto
    Maybe just dust?
     
  10. hkpzee

    hkpzee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Sep 5, 2011
    Hong Kong
    Patrick
    You know water condensation build up after you switch off the air conditioning due to the change in temperature, especially if humidity is near the 70% range or above... You need to keep the lens at a dry place in relatively constant temperature. Keeping your lens in an air-tight plastic container with some disposable dehumidifying packs in it would help. If you don't have any dehumidifying substance, raw rice would help remove moisture!
     
  11. lenshoarder

    lenshoarder Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nov 7, 2010
    In the first photo, that could be fungus. In the second, it just looks like dust. Still hard to tell.