Is 1/8000 shutter speed an absolute must?

Bl0at3r

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I enjoy taking pictures with fast primes wide open. I love the background blur/bokeh/subject isolation/3d effect.

I currently have a GX1, have had an E-M5 and am conscious that I keep hitting the max 1/4000 shutter speed on very bright days.

I know that the E-P5, E-M1 and GX7 all have 1/8000 max shutter and the GM1 has 1/16000 - but I'm not sure I want to buy one of those - I think I want another E-M5!

How many of you who like fast wide open primes in bright daylight also struggle? Or is it not really that much of an issue?
 

gryphon1911

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Questions like this are when I'm glad I have Lightroom.

I've dug into my archive of just under 40,000 images across all my camera bodies and checked to see how many of them are over 1/4000 of a second.

The number is just over 100. Not very many.

I do similar checks against ISO as well, which happen to be very useful - letting you realize that I have no images over ISO 6400 and of those, there are very few that are ISO 6400. Normally we are looking at the bulk being below ISO 2500.
 

Bl0at3r

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Questions like this are when I'm glad I have Lightroom.

I've dug into my archive of just under 40,000 images across all my camera bodies and checked to see how many of them are over 1/4000 of a second.

The number is just over 100. Not very many.

I do similar checks against ISO as well, which happen to be very useful - letting you realize that I have no images over ISO 6400 and of those, there are very few that are ISO 6400. Normally we are looking at the bulk being below ISO 2500.
That's useful, thanks.
But what about the fast primes wide open bit? Do you shoot like this or are all your shots at f8?
If I shot mainly slower lenses or higher f stops I'd probably have very few at anywhere near 1/4000 either

No issue.

ND filters.
Thanks - but I think I would get irritated adding and removing an ND continually.
 

usayit

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Thanks - but I think I would get irritated adding and removing an ND continually.
That's at first thought... but in practice its not a problem

* If I intend to shoot wide open in daylight, I generally will shoot extensively at wide open (in my case f/1). A 3 stop ND filter will bring down that 1/8000th exposure to 1/1000th. Let'say you move into cloudy resulting in a nominally shutter of a 1/500th. You are still working at 1/60th of a shutter and that's without bumping up the ISO a stop or two. That's still a workable shutter in most situations. If not, bump up the ISO a notch or two quickly and you are set. Unless you are working fast moving subjects you are not going to see a difference in a 1-2 (or 3) stop range (in still photography. Video is different). The end result is that in reality you don't need the granularity of control over shutter speed for stills and you don't change the ND filter as often as you would initially think.

In the film days, cloth shutters were limited to 1/1000th and some at 1/500th. It was common to attach a ND filter and leave it attached for most of a day's shooting. We have the present day advantage of changing ISO on the fly.

* I see photographers tightening filters on their lenses. Why? I generally just put them on and give a quick couple turns. Makes for switching easy.

* If you really insist on having the granular control, there is always cokin style square filters which are relatively fast to switch. You get great control over granular ND filters as a bonus.


PS> I almost always carry two ND filters; 10 stop and 3 stop.... no more no less. 10 stop is for tripod mounted long exposures in daylight. 3 stop is for handheld exposures in daylight for wider apertures. I have never needed anything else.... hasn't changed between film and digital.
 

Matero

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I don't know of absolut must, but I definitely miss it in E-M10 and Fuji XT-1. ND filters help but are a bit irritating, if I'm honest.
 

rparmar

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The "low ISO" setting (same as pulling the shot, but handier) together with the 1/8000s shutter speed gives me two more stops of latitude for shooting on bright days. I have found that to be very convenient, so much so that I no longer need to carry my ND filters. I would not want to go back to a camera without.
 

gryphon1911

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Even shooting the primes at f/1.8, most of the OMD now have a low ISO setting which gives you ISO 100. So, even of you are skirting 1/4000....that and using f/2.8 should get you in there.
 

dougjgreen

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That's useful, thanks.
But what about the fast primes wide open bit? Do you shoot like this or are all your shots at f8?
If I shot mainly slower lenses or higher f stops I'd probably have very few at anywhere near 1/4000 either



Thanks - but I think I would get irritated adding and removing an ND continually.
IMHO, it's not NEARLY as irritating as spending hundreds more just for a faster shutter speed that's basically unnecessary
 

Art

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3-stop ND filter should be sufficient for most outdoor situations at f1.8. No need to switch filters.


Sent from my iPhone using Mu-43
 

budeny

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If you're "keep hitting the max 1/4000" then you already have your answer. EP5 is in same price range as EM5 and EM1 is just next level camera with many other perks besides 1/8000 shutter speed.
 

Zee

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1/8000 was a requirement for me - I spend a lot of time in bright environments (deserts, snow fields, beaches etc) and seeing as I do a fair bit of lens swapping, having ND filters on everything is just a PITA - especially if I go from bright to dark frequently (which, annoyingly, also seems to happen a lot in the sorts of places I shoot).

In fact, I didn't realise there was a camera capable of 1/16000 - that could actually be kind handy!

Having said that, the E-M1 being able to drop to ISO low usually ensures I can get away with shooting wide open on my primes, though, really, stopping down up to a stop usually wont ruin a photo, if need be.

Z...
 

dougjgreen

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1/8000 was a requirement for me - I spend a lot of time in bright environments (deserts, snow fields, beaches etc) and seeing as I do a fair bit of lens swapping,

Z...
I'd be using a Polarizer as a matter of course with all of those sorts of subjects - And a Polarizer has a filter factor of 2 stops, which is essentially like having a 2 stop ND filter on your camera - with the added effect of polarization. This would generally obviate the need for either an additional ND filter, as well as a 1/8000 speed setting at base ISO.
 

Zee

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I'd be using a Polarizer as a matter of course with all of those sorts of subjects - And a Polarizer has a filter factor of 2 stops, which is essentially like having a 2 stop ND filter on your camera - with the added effect of polarization. This would generally obviate the need for either an additional ND filter, as well as a 1/8000 speed setting at base ISO.
I do use a polariser. Still maxing out shutter speeds at times...

Z...
 

LowriderS10

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I'm definitely not happy about it, but it's not a massive deal, especially since Olympus released the firmware that allows ISO 100 on the E-M5. Back when we just had ISO 200, 1/4000 was more of an annoyance.
 

Bl0at3r

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I'm definitely not happy about it, but it's not a massive deal, especially since Olympus released the firmware that allows ISO 100 on the E-M5. Back when we just had ISO 200, 1/4000 was more of an annoyance.
Ah, ok - when I had my E-M5 this wasn't available.

Good to know, thanks.
 

Dramaturg

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I actually miss 1/8000th shutter on my E-M5. At the moment I either use CPL filter (which is very desirable in the daylight for any type of photography; that gives me about 2 stops) or simply shoot overexposed and then pull down the exposure in post. In most cases I can easily pull up to 2 stops without clipping (someone said that OM-D has an iso-less sensor :)).
 
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