iPhone or Android?

Discussion in 'Other Systems' started by tm3, Dec 30, 2016.

  1. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    I am usually very happy with iOS. When my iPhone 6 updated to iOS 10, I was constantly tempted to end it's life with a hammer. Luckily iOS 10.2 has spared it of my wrath.
     
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  2. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    IMHO - at this point - the phone cameras on the upper-end models are all good enough for a phone camera - to the point that they should not be the #1 option - but comfort with the OS / other services is where it is at. Last time I bought a phone because of camera performance was my old Lumia 1020 - at the time it really was a stand-out against anything else.

    Today, My Nexus 5X is good enough for me as a phone camera - and I like the pure Google experience on it. While I have iOS and Samsung devices around here used for development and testing - the 5X despite being slightly behind in camera performance overcomes it with the overall goodness that I like to serve as my daily driver.

    I am tempted by a Pixel, simply because of the Google Assistant which I experience with my Google Home device - I would not upgrade however because the camera is somewhat better than the 5X and the phone is a bit faster.
     
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  3. Angus Gibbins

    Angus Gibbins Mu-43 Veteran

    211
    Dec 6, 2015
    Brisbane, Australia
    Angus
    I also tend to think most smart phone camera tests are null and void. On every Samsung or iPhone release date, there are reviews and comparison shots shortly after claiming that that smart phone is the best smart phone camera ever released. Two reasons why I think this is meaningless:

    1. Samsung and Apple are on different release cycles, each review and comparison is typically comparing a 2 day old phone to a 6 month old phone. In another 6 months this trend reverses when the other manufacturer updates their phone.
    2. These tests are in no way scientific, conditions are largely uncontrolled, are highly subjective and are done by tech nerds, not camera nerds.
     
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  4. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    I'm also in the camp of not worth changing for the camera. I'm an Android. I just picked up an S7, my son got the Pixel at the same time. They're very close. I will say I really like the Samsung's Auto/Pro modes and how simple it is to change between them. My son that got the Pixel use to have an iPhone, the 5c, it wasn't the best iPhone and Apple's OS updates finally killed*. Now it was an older iPhone and the "cheap" one even when it was new. But he's pretty happy with the switch, he has a few things to get use to but other than that he has no interest in going back.


    *My wife also has a 5c but has blocked the last 2 OS updates and has not run into the issues my son did with apps and system crashes.
     
  5. tm3

    tm3 Mu-43 Regular

    148
    Apr 17, 2011
    This is one of my concerns about Apple as there are reports of its updates "killing" devices (iPhones and iPads). My wife and I both have iPads, and both showed a noticeable degradation of performance right after an iOS upgrade. I have no idea if Android is plagued by the same problem.

    The takeaway from my original post seems to be that the choice should be based on factors other than camera performance and features.
     
  6. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    Most Android devices seem to have the opposite problem - not enough updates - as they are controlled by device makers and carriers rather than Google. If you have a "native" Google phone like a Nexus or Pixel - Google handles the updates and they seem to be much better with updates. I have heard that some phones sometimes have some issues with these updates - but never experienced it myself (I had multiple Nexus tablets and phones in the past and present).
     
  7. tm3

    tm3 Mu-43 Regular

    148
    Apr 17, 2011
    I have heard the same complaint about Android ie not enough updates. But, I'm not sure that I understand why that is a bad thing -- can you comment?

    Thinking in terms of my iPad, my understanding is that one of the main "features" of the update that crippled it was "improved animation" when opening and closing apps. I couldn't care less about the improved animation, especially at the cost of slower basic performance.
     
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  8. rloewy

    rloewy Mu-43 All-Pro

    May 5, 2014
    Ron
    Google is pretty good at getting security and usability updates for the OS - but if the device makers and carriers drag their feet at releasing these to the users - you might be running an older, less secure version that might not also have the latest performance and usability updates. This is why I tend to go with "pure" Google devices for my own use - despite the fact that at least until the Pixel release from Google - other device makers (mostly Samsung, LG and Moto) had better hardware specs than most Nexus devices.

    I personally also like the pure Android skin over what people like Samsung and LG used to get out (Moto was pretty good, it is mostly pure Android with very limited updates on it).

    I believe one of my old iPads succumbed to the same kind of upgraditis - when a newer version of iOS just rendered it unusable. (I was mostly using a Nexus 7 at this time so it did not bother me too much). This did not happen to me with Nexus branded devices - but I heard that there were some people with issues upgrading to version 7 of Android with the Nexus 6P (but it was a bug in the upgrade I think, not an upgrade that rendered all of them useless, just some devices had issues with the upgrade process itself).
     
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  9. tm3

    tm3 Mu-43 Regular

    148
    Apr 17, 2011
    Bricking devices by upgrades is a significant black mark against Apple, unless they are pretty isolated occurrences and also happen with the competition.
     
  10. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I've been an iPhone user since 2007 and while I don't use it as my primary camera, I welcome the steady and sometimes big improvements that have come with subsequent models. My iPhone 7 takes excellent photos and the new wide gamut display really makes them look good. Surprises me every time.

    A big thing for me is the usability and security of my device. Not enough current updates is a problem because updates patch security holes in the system. Apple has provided both frequent minor updates and annual major upgrades, which often improve security. Major upgrades affect the performance of older models because the new features often require more horsepower. After all, how do you think Windows 7 would run on a Pentium computer? (if it could) That's the price of progress. One can choose not to upgrade to a new iOS version, but then run the risk of leaving a security hole unpatched. At least Apple makes them easily available. Can't say the same for Android. :)
     
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  11. ex machina

    ex machina Mu-43 Top Veteran

    830
    Jan 3, 2014
    Northern Virgnia
    One factor to consider is whether the ecosystem you are considering supports the apps you want to use. I haven't checked in ages but it used to be the case that iOS had more and better, or better-supported photo apps. I've recently purchased a DJI drone that can be controlled from a smartphone/tablet and there's tons of DJI forum chatter over Android compatibility/reliability issues.
     
  12. ex machina

    ex machina Mu-43 Top Veteran

    830
    Jan 3, 2014
    Northern Virgnia
    My anecdotal and personal experience as an IT staff member in a small business (35-75 employees) suggests it's more the latter. Until I upgraded to an iPhone 7 last month, my venerable iPhone 5 ran noticeably faster on the latest OS, though there were lots of features the older phone's hardware didn't support. Now, my iPhone 3G wasn't bricked by the last supported OS update, but it was significantly slower. I don't remember my iPhone 4 being much impacted, performance-wise, by its last supported OS.

    I don't recall any of our employees phones being bricked by updates, though most of the Androids were orphaned except for security updates and so didn't have the opportunity for problems.
     
  13. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I believe these are fairly rare occurrences, but Apple acted quickly to address those who were affected. One nice thing is that if there's a nearby Apple Store, one could get help right away. Never happened to me. Knock, knock.
     
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  14. Angus Gibbins

    Angus Gibbins Mu-43 Veteran

    211
    Dec 6, 2015
    Brisbane, Australia
    Angus
    Apple's support experience is second to none. They have released bad versions of software from time to time, but it's usually pulled within 24 hours and rereleased a few weeks later. They're not bricking older devices.

    They're not bricking devices. What does happen though is new versions of iOS require better hardware to run. It may look the same but there's a lot that changes under the hood in new major iOS versions. Apple used to have a problem of only testing their software on newer hardware, BUT, they are getting better at making sure newer software runs adequately on older devices.
     
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  15. Aushiker

    Aushiker Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 12, 2014
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Andrew
    You need to come and play with my LG 4 please ... I gave up on the Olympus app and dumped it ages ago.
     
  16. Aushiker

    Aushiker Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 12, 2014
    Fremantle, Western Australia
    Andrew
    I am in an Apple household (Apple laptop/desktops/phones/iPads) but my phone is an Android [LG 4] and my tablet is an Android [Sony Xperia Z4]. I switched from iPhone some time back, probably around iPhone 4 or thereabouts and have not regretted it. The diversity in the Android market really appeals to me. I have had Samsung, LG, Google and HTC handsets and my next phone will likely be an Samsung S7 Edge or an S8 Edge.
     
  17. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    Bricking devices? Well maybe not. But 2 iPhone 5Cs, one had the updates blocked and works fine. The other didn't and locks / reboots often. As I mentioned the 5C was not their best, even the guys I've spoken to in the Apple stores try to distance themselves from it. But my wife has also blocked the updates from her iPad Mini. Her 5C and Mini run fine and she has NO interest in upgrading the OS or device.

    The issue with Android and updates. As others have mentioned, if you have a Google device (Nexus / Pixel / ...) then when Google rolls out the update and you can get it if you want it. For ever other device from every other manufacturer; the manufacturer rolls out their "flavor enhanced" version of the update. Then the carrier has to test and add their secret sauce before releasing it. They (manufacturer and carrier) start with the most recent devices then move back to older ones. There is a cutoff where devices ## months/years old just don't get updated.

    Of course there are untold number of forums and groups that hack and distribute versions of Android for current and older devices. I'm guessing the same is true for Apple?
     
  18. Harvey Melvin Richards

    Harvey Melvin Richards Photo Posting Junkie

    Feb 15, 2014
    Southwest Utah
    My wife uses a iPhone 5C, does all the updates and has zero issues. She is far from a power user though.
     
  19. davidzvi

    davidzvi Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 12, 2012
    Outside Boston MA
    David
    Neither is my wife, my son? He's a heavy user, but not really a power user if you get me. When he started having the issues I did a little searching. If I recall when 10.# was released there was something that caused many to have the update fail and have to restart or reinitialize? He took it into the apple store and they had to backup his data, initialize and restore. But it was never really the same.

    One thing I personally like about Android is the ability to customize it. My tablet is rooted and running a few modes with a custom launcher. I'm tempted to hack my phone as well, but I'm pretty sure the next major OS should be out this month so I might just wait.
     
  20. tm3

    tm3 Mu-43 Regular

    148
    Apr 17, 2011
    Thanks for the ongoing comments.

    My "bricking" comment is based on what I read in one of the Apple forums. I was looking for info on how to get my iPad performance back, and came across several posts claiming that iOS upgrades had rendered iPads completely nonfunctional and with no resolution from Apple. These may be very isolated cases, of course. I also heard of iMac problems before I bought mine, yet it is now 6 years old and still working great (knock on wood).

    I think that I will give the iPhone 7 a shot. The information in this thread has been very helpful.
     
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