"Invisible Black Backdrop"

Discussion in 'Lighting Forum' started by ksn, Apr 6, 2011.

  1. ksn

    ksn Mu-43 Veteran

    266
    Mar 6, 2011
    I was searching for something completely unrelated to photography and stumbled upon this.

    The Invisible Black Backdrop – Photography Technique » Glyn Dewis Blog

    Some results from others.

    Flickr: JMSF415's stuff tagged with invisibleblackbackdrop
    Kelley Simpson Photography: The Invisible Black Backdrop

    I don't have the equipment for this, but would love to see what others have done if anybody else has experience with it.

    Also, a techniques forum would be really cool. I had no idea where I should have posted this.
     
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  2. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Thanks for sharing

    I've used this technique outdoors when trying to freeze some very fast action. Had to use an ND filter, but yes, it can produce some very nice results. It's a great example of how reading and experimenting can make you a great photographer.

    Thanks for sharing!
     
  3. stratokaster

    stratokaster Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jan 4, 2011
    Kyiv, Ukraine
    Pavel
    Thanks for sharing! When I finally get home and have access to my equipment, I definitely will experiment with this technique.
     
  4. bilzmale

    bilzmale Mu-43 All-Pro

    This technique works well for macro shots too.
     
  5. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Thanks KSN for the heads up on this link. Awesome stuff.
    I've just bought a Nikon SB600 flash so I can't wait to give it a go.
     
  6. thearne3

    thearne3 Mu-43 Top Veteran

    807
    Jan 28, 2010
    Redding, CT USA
    Great topic! For related manual/off camera flash techniques check out Strobist, esp the Lighting Archive 101 and 102.

    Here are some pics taken in a very light room the first with 'snooted' flash, the second shooting through an umbrella:

    20100225_17-04-58.

    Day_17.
     
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  7. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    I've actually done this in broad daylight with no flash, using a P&S. It's not hard once you know how.

    <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/debit72/3973136007/" title="Fire Flower by debit72, on Flickr"> 3973136007_691156a175. "500" height="500" alt="Fire Flower"></a>
     
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  8. ksn

    ksn Mu-43 Veteran

    266
    Mar 6, 2011
    Can you elaborate? I have a hotshoe flash I inherited, but haven't ever used before (have to clean out battery acid first), but it isn't off camera.

    I got this shot yesterday, but it was a dim setting with a light on the subject and required some post processing (desaturate and adjusting levels) but it looks fairly similar. Perhaps in situations, post processing can get you similar results.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. JohnMetsn

    JohnMetsn Mu-43 Veteran

    I got quite interested in this method and thought it wouldn't be bad introduction for me to the world of playing with lights photography. As I'm on very a low budget, I need to keep it as cheap as possible. May I ask more experienced users here for some tips and answers?

    First of all, is it at all possible to achieve such effect with Panasonic G cameras (specifically GF1)?

    Second of all...would it be possible with this setup?

    Flash - Nissin Di466
    Wireless Flash Trigger - YONGNUO CTR-301P
    Umbrella with Swivel Stand

    Plus I guess I should get somewhere umbrella stand, as hooking it up to the TV on the wall wouldn't be probably ideal.

    Thank you for reading :smile:
     
  10. sprinke

    sprinke Mu-43 All-Pro

    Apr 5, 2011
    Pasadena, CA
    Debi
    You've pretty much got the basics. You need a lot of light on the subject and not very much light on the background. In my flower picture above, the flower was in bright direct sunlight. The background behind it was in the shade and semi-shade. Adjust your exposure for the subject and the background fades into black.

    If you're doing this with controlled light, the background must be far enough away that no light from your flash falls upon it.

    I don't own an external flash of any type, but I've done this with sunlight and with random lamps around the house.
     
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  11. Spuff

    Spuff Mu-43 Top Veteran

    652
    Dec 5, 2010
    Berkshire, UK.
    It certainly can and Sprinke has explained above. I did this just in Lightroom and I took this outdoors in daylight, no flash, no strong light or anything. But most times you won't have the conditions to allow this and then the flash method (I wouldn't be doing that with animals) or Sprinke style would be needed.
    5632925258_092c544e7c_z.
     
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  12. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Here's how ..

    I tried this technique using my GH2. At first, the max shutter speed you can set is 1/160. Consulting the owners manual it shows (p72) that certain flash modes can use up to 1/4000th, though no real explanation how to go that high.

    I finally got the answer and thought I'd share it. The GH2 (and other Panasonic cameras) have a "FP" Focal Plane feature that allows the higher shutter sync speeds. It turns out that it only works with an external flash that can "communicate" with the camera. I tried the "360" Panasonic flash. Once you place the flash in "Manual" you can dial in any speed up to 1/4000 o a second. I'll post a photo later today - dinner is almost on the table!
     
  13. jbuch84

    jbuch84 Mu-43 Veteran

    233
    Feb 9, 2011
    Orlando, FL
    James
    By communicate do you mean use the same ttl as the camera? I'm just curious if my einstein flash heads will do this.. I may be looking for a trade from my gf2 to gh2 :)
     
  14. flash

    flash Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Apr 29, 2010
    1 hour from Sydney Australia.
    Gordon
    Why do you need to go to manual in FP mode? TTL should wotk as well.

    FP mode just pulses the flash so that it looks like a continuous light while the shutter slit moves over the sensor. The downside is that you loose between 2 and 4 stops of power this way, so you'll need to be close to your subject.

    Gordon
     
  15. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Yes, exactly
     
  16. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    What I've found is that until you go into manual mode, the camera will not go above 1/160. I've reached out to my sources to see if there is another way around this. I'd be interested in hearing from anyone who has been able to go above 1/160 in any other way.
     
  17. Stephen Geis

    Stephen Geis Mu-43 Top Veteran

    538
    May 13, 2010
    Charlotte, NC
    How do you trigger the flash? Do you have it attached to your hotshoe or through another method? Wireless or wired remote off camera flash?

    Thanks.
     
  18. Wasabi Bob

    Wasabi Bob Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Right from the hot shoe. I have a wireless "Cactus" system, but since it won't support TTL it will not work. The Cactus system is a great buy if you are looking for basic wireless, and it's very reasonable.
     
  19. jbuch84

    jbuch84 Mu-43 Veteran

    233
    Feb 9, 2011
    Orlando, FL
    James
    Oh btw I have found that using einstein flash heads I can get will over 160 sync speed. The camera still registers 160 but the duration of the actual flash is so short, stops most action dead in it's tracks
     
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  20. Stephen Geis

    Stephen Geis Mu-43 Top Veteran

    538
    May 13, 2010
    Charlotte, NC
    I have a GF1 and have been playing around with off-camera flash. Want to try to figure out how to get this effect while having light come from a different angle.

    Played around with it at 1/160, triggering my Olympus fl36r with the on-camera pop-up flash dialed down to ev -2. But the low light from this on camera flash is illuminating the otherwise dark room, turning what would have been black background into a visible background.

    I think I need to invest in a wireless flash trigger to get the sidelighting that I am looking to acheive ...