Featured Interior Photography

Discussion in 'Lighting Tutorials' started by MichaelSewell, Apr 18, 2018.

  1. MichaelSewell

    MichaelSewell Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 1, 2015
    Burnley, UK
    Michael A. Sewell
    D4A5040-1024x682.jpg

    This series of images were requested for a PR company that specialised in PR for companies dealing with interiors. The brief was rather vague, other than to get a variation of images, including details. The guidance would come from the builder and owner.

    The first image I wanted to get, was the initial view I had as I walked into the kitchen diner. That wonderful view through the panoramic doors was an obvious talking point, and also my biggest headache! Besides the usual issue of wanting to retain the view through the patio doors, it was also my only source of light into the room. Consequently, the island unit was quite heavily in shadow on my side, and there was little light on the side of the island that faced the cupboards frame right.

    Adding light to a scene can be problematic, as the increased light near the light source can be quite obvious if not carefully managed. Usually it shows on ceilings and walls, creating an unnatural scene. As I needed to show the island unit in full, and the fact I couldn't go any further back without showing the edge of the entrance, it meant the ceiling wasn't in frame. I therefore had a lot more freedom with regards to the lighting.

    Normally, a white shoot through umbrella is ideal in doors. But here, I needed better control, so the light could be directed and also concentrated. I chose to use a 120cm Octa, and placed it frame left and as far back from the island unit as possible. Yes, it means the light would have to work harder, but it also means there wouldn't be a noticeable falloff from the frame left side of the island and the wall cabinets frame right. The Octa was attached to a 600Ws location light, firing at 1/8th output.

    This gave me a perceived correct exposure of 1/125th sec f7.1 ISO200. I then took three exposures at ISO 100, 200 & 400, allowing me to manually blend the window so as to match the internal exposure better. I also had an over exposure with the ISO400 frame, allowing me to add detail to any particularly dark shadows.

    If you look carefully, I've just noticed there is a giveaway of the additional light frame left, caused by a splash of light across the corner of a cabinet, which leaves a shadow on the wall.

    Damn!

    I sometimes use additional speedlights for fill, if there are alcoves, or other dark areas. That wasn't an issue here, and the one location light seemed to do the trick quite nicely.

    1/125th sec f7.1 ISO 100, 200 and 400.

    D4A5120-1024x682.jpg

    This was taken from the outside, through the open patio doors. The light is mostly provided by that same 120cm Octa in pretty much the same position, but now firing towards the room entrance where I took the first image from, and firing at the same output of 1/8th. This is a single frame, as opposed to the first image's blend of three . However, I needed to increase the aperture to ensure I had sufficient depth of field for the room beyond. To compensate, I increased the ISO, which compensated for the aperture change, and also used a lower shutter speed to capture more of the ambient light in the room beyond.

    1/60th sec f10 ISO400

    D4A5184-1024x682.jpg

    This image was taken without the additional light. As there was sufficient light from the patio doors, and the units were lit quite evenly, this was taken as single frame.

    1/60th sec f5.6 ISO400

    D4A5123-1024x682.jpg

    D4A5132-1024x682.jpg

    D4A5152-682x1024.jpg

    These are some of the detail images I mentioned. They were shot at ambient, and generally at ISO400 1/60th sec and f10, except the last image, which was f7.1
     
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  2. pondball

    pondball Mu-43 All-Pro

    @MichaelSewell@MichaelSewell I'm glad we've finished our kitchen reno and are happy with it... else if my better half ever saw this post I'd be knee deep in construction tools again... and that could only mean less time for photography... and golf... and bowls... and...
    Only an expert would have picked up on the wayward "splash of light" Michael! I obviously missed it completely until you mentioned it.
    Once again, thanks for the great tip.
     
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  3. Will Focus

    Will Focus Mu-43 All-Pro

    Fantastic work. Tremendous attention to lighting detail. I am also impressed by the way you have maintained perspective with the vertical and horizontal lines of the walls, cabinets, counter, etc. What lenses were you using for this job and do you apply perspective adjustments in post ? There seems to be a bit of purple around the ceiling perimeter in your third image. There is also a hint in image #2. Is that a gloss finish that is picking up color from the chairs ?
     
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  4. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 Hall of Famer Subscribing Member

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    Outstanding work again, Michael. I would have guessed that you'd need to use auxiliary lighting to balance the lighting, but it sure isn't obvious in the image (until you point it out :).
     
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  5. MichaelSewell

    MichaelSewell Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 1, 2015
    Burnley, UK
    Michael A. Sewell
    For the last two and a half years (maybe a bit more), it's been the M.Zuiko 12-40mm f2.8 Pro exclusively. Usually at the 12mm end. Before that, it was the Nikkor 24-70mm f2.8 generally at 24mm. As for perspective correction, it's carried out in post, which is far easier recently with Lightroom making such a good job of it via "auto". Before that, well, it was generally a pain in the bum.

    That's an LED lighting strip. They went around the ceiling recess, and were user selectable, regarding the colour.
     
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  6. ohaya

    ohaya Mu-43 Veteran

    323
    Mar 1, 2016
    USA
    Did you shoot these handheld? Or did you use a tripod?
     
  7. MichaelSewell

    MichaelSewell Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 1, 2015
    Burnley, UK
    Michael A. Sewell
    These were taken using a tripod
     
  8. dogs100

    dogs100 Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Nov 12, 2011
    N Devon UK
    Geoff
    Do I tell the truth and admit that the first time I read this I saw the title as 'inferior photography' and couldn't see anything inferior in the shots at all ... but I am tempted to say the splash of light ruined the whole set ... ;)

    These are just professional and I am grateful for the time you spend explaining ... thank you!
     
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  9. ralf-11

    ralf-11 Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 16, 2017
    do you ever use tilt/shift lenses?
     
  10. MichaelSewell

    MichaelSewell Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 1, 2015
    Burnley, UK
    Michael A. Sewell
    Not for a long time.

    The modern post processing tools have pretty much addressed most issues, and with ease.
    I had stopped using it on FF some time ago, and the lack of a tilt shift on m43 was never part of the equation when moving over to m43 exclusively
     
  11. AllanG

    AllanG Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Aug 26, 2014
    Brisbane, Australia
    Allan
    Michael, a really excellent post and I learned quite a lot from it.
    When I look at your images they really are so clean and just look right, but the underlying effort and technique is not apparent like in some others I've seen.
    I'd love to see a bit more on the actual lighting setup that you employ and how it's arranged in certain situation to get even lighting with no intrusive shadows.
     
  12. MichaelSewell

    MichaelSewell Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 1, 2015
    Burnley, UK
    Michael A. Sewell
    Unfortunately, I'm really crap at remembering to get the BTS stuff
     
  13. AllanG

    AllanG Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Aug 26, 2014
    Brisbane, Australia
    Allan
    Sorry, BTS?
     
  14. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler Subscribing Member

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    Behind The Scenes
     
  15. AllanG

    AllanG Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Aug 26, 2014
    Brisbane, Australia
    Allan
    Acronyms, WTF
     
  16. Kennikins

    Kennikins Mu-43 Top Veteran

    852
    Mar 25, 2017
    UK
    Those are initialisms not acronyms
     
  17. AllanG

    AllanG Mu-43 Top Veteran

    523
    Aug 26, 2014
    Brisbane, Australia
    Allan
    Ok. Initialisms, WTF.
     
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  18. Kennikins

    Kennikins Mu-43 Top Veteran

    852
    Mar 25, 2017
    UK
    Bonzer m8.
     
  19. MichaelSewell

    MichaelSewell Mu-43 All-Pro Subscribing Member

    Sep 1, 2015
    Burnley, UK
    Michael A. Sewell
    Sorry
    Yes. Behind the scenes
     
  20. ralf-11

    ralf-11 Mu-43 Veteran

    332
    Jan 16, 2017
    is part of the 'clean look' use of extra Vibrance (LR) in post?

    some of the shots look almost hyper-realistic to me
     
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