Interesting Olympus default exposure "weakness," I again noticed with the Pen -F

BushmanOrig

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I was prepping images for an article on the Pen F and profiles I am working on when I did something I always do but never think about...

When I edit my Olympus images I almost always increase the brightness using layers or curves - this has become part of my editing routine for years... Below a typical histogram you will see in Photoshop...

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The histogram positioned to the left equals a large amount of tonal data lost forever - this is easily corrected using exposure techniques like "ettr" when prepping your shot...

The original jpeg image (3 off) out the camera:

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After upping the image brightness with the PS curves function...

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It's important to know that upping the brightness in curves does not create more image data - all you do is manipulating the available data. The only way to have more data is the moment you record the image...

What I normally do when editing my images, is upping the image brightness, slightly increase contrast again and then any specifics if needed, and finally sharpening. I almost always up the brightness...

Best

Siegfried
 

pdk42

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I think most cameras err on the side of slight under exposure. As you say the best fix is to add exposure at capture stage. And of course, the metering may need a bit of help from the photographer - a white sheet of paper will be considered as 18% grey to the meter.
 

mrjoemorgan

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I think most cameras err on the side of slight under exposure. As you say the best fix is to add exposure at capture stage. And of course, the metering may need a bit of help from the photographer - a white sheet of paper will be considered as 18% grey to the meter.
I remember someone saying that the EM1.3 exposes more to the right than they are used to and had to “undo” their habit of ETTR. I wonder if that was their attempt to correct for a “perfect” exposure? I get the 1.3 today so I’ll do some tests vs the 1.2 and see what happens
 

pdk42

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I remember someone saying that the EM1.3 exposes more to the right than they are used to and had to “undo” their habit of ETTR. I wonder if that was their attempt to correct for a “perfect” exposure? I get the 1.3 today so I’ll do some tests vs the 1.2 and see what happens
Would be interesting to see your conclusions.
 

BushmanOrig

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I remember someone saying that the EM1.3 exposes more to the right than they are used to and had to “undo” their habit of ETTR. I wonder if that was their attempt to correct for a “perfect” exposure? I get the 1.3 today so I’ll do some tests vs the 1.2 and see what happens
I have a G9 with me for a while and did some images with it. It surprising how "accurately" Panasonic push the histogram to the right. The G9 never seems to purposely go outside its DR but that said, the camera is much more comfortable pushing the exposure to the right... Could be the EM1 III is doing the same...

We also know older cameras benefit more from ETTR...

Interested to get your feedback...
 
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DrNuy

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Hi,
Is it a compromise with RAW vs JPG internal processing ???
Anyway, the individual sensor calibration could be the "problem".
My personal solution :
My camera (EM5, EM1-II and GM5) sensors have been calibrated (screen & printer too, BTW).
I use these profiles in Capture One (in "linear" mode) and this sort of problems is gone.
Regards,
 

ac12

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One of the problems is with the EVF.
The resolution of the EVF is NOT 20MP.
So there could be blown highlights that are not visible in the EVF, at standard 0 magnification.
If you magnify the image in the EVF, then you might see the blown highlights.
This is because the blown pixels are at a resolution level finer than the EVF can display.

You can also see this effect by simply zooming the lens.
At say 100mm you can see blown hightlights, but at 25mm the blown indicators disappear.
It is still blown if you look at the pic on your monitor, but at 25mm the EVF won't show it.
Again, the the blown pixels are at a resolution level finer than the EVF can display.
 

pdk42

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One of the problems is with the EVF.
The resolution of the EVF is NOT 20MP.
So there could be blown highlights that are not visible in the EVF, at standard 0 magnification.
If you magnify the image in the EVF, then you might see the blown highlights.
This is because the blown pixels are at a resolution level finer than the EVF can display.

You can also see this effect by simply zooming the lens.
At say 100mm you can see blown hightlights, but at 25mm the blown indicators disappear.
It is still blown if you look at the pic on your monitor, but at 25mm the EVF won't show it.
Again, the the blown pixels are at a resolution level finer than the EVF can display.
What’s the EVF got to do with it?
 

PakkyT

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One of the problems is with the EVF.
The resolution of the EVF is NOT 20MP.
So there could be blown highlights that are not visible in the EVF, at standard 0 magnification.
But you can see more blown highlights on an EVF than you ever could with an OVF (which would show zero blown highlights). I will take the EVF any day over the old OVF. Besides that is why they give you tools like the histogram, blinkies, and magnification. The photographer is required to do some basics with the operation of the camera after all. :rolleyes-38:
 

StirlingBartholomew

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If you are habitually shooting to the right then you will be habitually reducing highlights in PP. LR will mess with this formula because in some versions of LR highlight recovery is taken out of your hands. I habitually reduce highlights. Keep exposure set to manual and use the histogram. I don't press my luck exposing to the right. Blown highlights are more of a headache than wasting 1/4 of a stop at the high end. In a scene with reflective surfaces you need to know what is beyond recovery at the high end and just let it blow out. Otherwise you will be pushing your midtones into the shadow zone. I used Minor White's zone system half a century ago. It becomes second nature, you don't analyze every shot. With the histogram you just open up until you get a spike and back off 1/3rd. If you want your whites to have texture they need to be below 90% with small areas peaking in the mid 90s. When your red channel reaches 100 you will get a color shift beyond that. Shooting the E-500 made me very aware of color shift. The red channel would block and you wound end up with orange patches on the red bumpers hanging against the blue hull of a fishing vessel.

Yes, I know that most of you folks understand this stuff but we may have some young people watching this forum.
 
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S-Osolin

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It's useful in protecting highlights, and often nets a better exposure anyway. I think it's also a way of tricking dynamic range tests a little. If you push up a slightly underexposed image, it'll have less noise in the shadows than if you push up a normal exposure. And that's mostly what dynamic range tests are about. If you compare dynamic range charts on dxo, you get Olympus with a slight edge over Panasonic. Em1ii vs. g9 for example. With em1x Olympus toned it down, and it's dynamic range chart is closer in line of g9.
 

doady

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I'd say your exposure is fine, the dynamic range of the subject with that lighting is less than the camera can capture. If you increase the exposure, you'll shift the curve right, and you won't have a black shadow. A good basic correction in processing is to use a curve adjustment and bring the right edge in line with the right side of the histogram. This will match the dynamic range of the subject to the output of the software. You can bend the curve if you wish into an S or C shape.
 

PakkyT

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You can bend the curve if you wish into an S or C shape.
I am of course familiar with common S shape but what is the C shape? Like an "n" or actually like a "c"? Or do you just mean the "S" curve but with just the top or the bottom curve and not both?
 
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I am of course familiar with common S shape but what is the C shape? Like an "n" or actually like a "c"? Or do you just mean the "S" curve but with just the top or the bottom curve and not both?
C curve.png
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You can move the nodalpoint to raise or lower values along the tonal range. That Black circle is the nodal point.
 

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