IBIS or OIS?

Discussion in 'This or That? (MFT only)' started by Jake, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. Jake

    Jake Mu-43 Regular

    31
    Mar 12, 2010
    N.W U.K
    I am really torn between the Pan GF1 and the Oly EPL1.
    My main worry is camera shake. Not that i have shakey hands but i will mostly be taking pics of my new born Son, general family pics and i would say 50/50 insde and out. My initial concern is that the Pan 20mm 1.7 has not OIS.
    Would the IBIS in the EPL-1 really make a big difference in the quality of the type of pictures i will be taking becuase most of my pics will not involve tracking or fast moving things.
    I think this is the deciding factor i need to weigh up before i purchase.
    Any advice always appreciated.:thumbup:
     
  2. Streetshooter

    Streetshooter Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    Phila, Pa USA
    Jake,
    The IBIS will make a difference. It works with every lens. In time, you may want to expand your vision and get another lens. This way, it will have stabilization.
    I use the Pen 1 with the 20 all the time. It's great to have that lens stabilized....very low light is a cinch...
    shooter
     
  3. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    892
    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    Go for IBIS. I'm not the most steady shooter out there, and reaching a sharp handheld shot at the far end of the 14~42 @1/8th sec. makes me feel superhuman every time.

    Be aware it gives fallacious confidence if you switch back to non-stabilised shooting afterward though :wink:
     
  4. Streetshooter

    Streetshooter Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    Phila, Pa USA
    Mauve...just when I thought I was steadying up......geeze...
     
  5. sabesh

    sabesh Mu-43 Veteran

    Typically, OIS is tested to be better than IBIS. However, I went with IBIS (E-P2), as I wanted stabilization with MF & legacy lenses. Cheers.
     
  6. mauve

    mauve Mu-43 Top Veteran

    892
    Mar 9, 2010
    Paris, France
    I didn't say I make it every time :wink: just that it's within reach (at least a split 50/50 success/failure ) :tongue:

    Anyway, it's a bit besides the point, as I shoot mostly people in the street, and even if I nail the shot, more often than not, the subject is blurred from his own motion.:dash2:

    But hopefully, my 1.7/20 is on its way. :whoo:
     
  7. Rich M

    Rich M Mu-43 Veteran

    315
    Mar 2, 2010
    Jake -

    I wish there were EASY answers.....because I like easy answers :smile:

    Unfortunately, this is one of those not so black and white...IBIS or OIS. Let me ramble on a bit.

    I feel that in many ways it is difficult to discuss stabilization without discussing focusing speed. I have both a GF-1 and an E-P2. I just got the E-P2 a few weeks ago for one single underlying reason.....IBIS.

    I have to digress here a bit....In the world of general photography an old rule of thumb was that if you were shooting a lens of XXmm focal length then your shutter speed should be ~ 1/xx....or you were going to be prone to picture blur due to lens shake.

    Practically speaking that meant short lens could shoot at slower speeds (50mm lens should be shot at @ 1/60 sec......200m at @ 1/200 sec)...and be less prone to shake because of that. Longer lenses had to be shot at faster speeds.....and therefore became a problem to shoot in low light. Enter the science of stabilization....and initially it was mainly geared for LONGER lenses. Long lenses now could be shot @ 1/60 of a second..with no blur due to shake.

    I bought the E-P2 solely because of IBIS. I wanted to shoot longer manual focus lenses and get the benefit of stabilization. And, guess what, it WORKS!!! I can now shoot my longer (telephoto) legacy manual focus lenses at slower speeds and no motion blur because of Olympus' IBIS. Couldn't do that with my GF-1.

    BUT......compared to my GF-1, my E-P2 (with autofocus lenses) focuses like molasses in January...even with the 20/1.7 on it. THAT is a problem if you are shooting fast movers like kids or pets. Stabilization helps with lens shake...it doesn't freeze motion.

    Damn....no easy answer.....

    If it were me....and kids are a primary subject, I might get the GF-1 and the 20/1.7 (which no matter what others tell you, does not require stabilization)....and see how you do.

    That is unless the E-PL1 focuses a lot faster than the E-P2.....

    R
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    An age old debate that will likely never end. OIS has traditionally been recommended for long lenses, as it stabilises the image in the viewfinder, thus making it easier to keep track of the subject. But if you're likely to use manual lenses, and that's where m4/3s offers so much more than any other format, then IBIS is a clear winner, whether the lens is short or long. I can handhold my Nikon 300mm and get sharp results no problem.

    I have to say that AF speed is kind of irrelevant, as that's nothing more than a technology issue. Panasonic currently bests Olympus on AF, but all that will equalise in time. Also, if you're using manual lenses and doing some pre-focus work, IBIS will be a major benefit all round. But considering that you have a new-born son, AF speed is not going to be an issue for quite a few years, unless the boy is super boy.

    IBIS is going to benefit you all round, as you'll be able to take shots in natural light far more easily than without. The options for shooting your son will improve significantly having IBIS.

    Cheers

    Ray
     
    • Like Like x 3
  9. cosinaphile

    cosinaphile Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    new york city
    the ability to stabilize any lens in the pen sensor solution trumps lens based ois every time, IMHO

    even as pannys ois is slightly more effective is canceling shake than the sensor variety of oly

    one of the biggest mistakes panny made was not giving the 20 1.7 ois...
    firstly its a normal focal l, not wide... secondly its barrel si sizable for such small front element lens there is room for the engineers to have implemented it

    this is a 1.7 normal lens for micro 4\3 and its 400 damn buck.....s ois missing from it is pathetic and miserly IMO but , so is the redesign of pannys 14 -45 , perhaps the tiniest best kit zoom in history, into a bigger, longer, smaller elemented , unois switchable, plactic mounted bit of average , .....sigh
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Hey Jake there are certainly alot of differing opinions for OIS or IBIS. I would suggest just to purchase the camera that you like at the first glance. I have a GF1 and obviously OIS. OIS is great for me because i didn't have any previous lenses and if i buy a camera i would just get the lenses made by the same manufacturer as the camera, ie (panasonic) i have bought the 20mm the 14-45 and the 45-200 and for me the Lumix G lenses are way enough quality for me. So its really comes down to the camera you like the best. I would say if you have already have a lot of lenses get the IBIS but if you're like me and just want a nice looking camera and want to get good quality Panasonic IOS lenses, then i would look to the OIS.

    I hope i haven't confused you.
    When it boils down - get what you want, i'm sure both work really well.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  11. Brian Mosley

    Brian Mosley Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    Hi Jake,

    if you want the best stabilised solution, it has to be the E-PL1... you won't be disappointed. Olympus have dropped electronic levels, reduced the LCD size and set the maximum shutter speed to 1/2000s to position it below the E-P1/2 but it's easier to use and image quality is improved slightly. A damned good move imho - especially if you use or intend to use legacy lenses - the one touch magnified view toggle is brilliant.

    Also, you have the option of adding the high res evf when you can afford it.

    Neither camera will make you a better photographer... That's why we have the PAD, image quest and Lightzone contest :wink:

    Cheers

    Brian
     
  12. Rich M

    Rich M Mu-43 Veteran

    315
    Mar 2, 2010
    Crikey......I love these discussions......so civil compared to other forums. :2thumbs:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  13. cosinaphile

    cosinaphile Mu-43 All-Pro

    Dec 26, 2009
    new york city
    micro 4\3 owners are a civilized bunch , the wisdom and flexability of the format itself filters down to inspire measured , intelligent, un belligerent discourse ,


    thanks for noticing:smile:
     
    • Like Like x 2
  14. OzRay

    OzRay Mu-43 Legend

    Jan 29, 2010
    South Gippsland, Australia
    Ray, not Oz
    I'm not sure that I quite represent that statement. :eek: I'm not that perfect.

    Cheers

    Ray
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Brian Mosley

    Brian Mosley Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    LOL, cosinaphile... :flypig:

    :thiagree: Ray, but we do our best here :cloud-9-039:

    Other forums seem so much like hard work in comparison :2thumbs:

    Cheers

    Brian
     
    • Like Like x 1
  16. Jake

    Jake Mu-43 Regular

    31
    Mar 12, 2010
    N.W U.K
    Lots of great advice. I dont have any old lenses and will only have a kit lens either Pan or Oly and the 20mm for some considerable time.
    Feel free to keep adding to the thread as i am shure it will help others aswel as myself.
    Great advice l and good comments shows this is a very friendly community that is not biased towards either.
     
  17. Pelao

    Pelao Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Feb 3, 2010
    Ontario, Canada
    Stabilization, of whatever kind, can be great. In my experience, within the context of the shooting I do, I chose the GF1.

    1. I much prefer the controls and user interface. Logical, simple and easy to use under fast changing circumstances
    2. I am unlikely to use legacy lenses. I wanted a m4/3 for the size and portability, and the 20/1.7 in particular offers excellent quality. I have since added a 14-45. Other lenses are used on my larger cameras.
    3. I strongly disagree with OzRay's sense that autofocus speed is irrelevant. To me it is crucial. I capture moments, and I don't like to wait. I do think the difference between a GF1 and EP2 autofocus is a bit exaggerated - but it is very real. The difference may be fixed in time, but I am shooting now...
    4. How will you display your images? Web? Print - and to what size? With the 20/1.7 simply up your ISO and you will capture the moment.

    Remember, many of the images you admire were taken without any stabilization. That doesn't mean we should not harness new technology when it comes along, but we should harness it when it works within the entire context of shooting style / camera / lens / environment. Stabilization makes the most difference on longer lenses, and it is present, and arguably better than IBIS, on Panasonic's longer lenses.

    There will be no wrong decision here. There can be one that is more right for you. Spend time with each camera. Also, I recommend spending time in the various image threads on this forum. Often the lens / camera combination is shared.

    All that said, get on with it :smile:. Make a decision. You need to capture those moments...
     
    • Like Like x 3
  18. Streetshooter

    Streetshooter Administrator Emeritus

    Dec 15, 2009
    Phila, Pa USA
    Jake....
    I awoke with a vision this morning.......
    I see you buying more than 1 lens in the future....... but , but.....
    oh, it's ok...... that's better, you have IBIS so you don't have to worry....
    good...choice
     
  19. Iconindustries

    Iconindustries Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Extremely well written Pelao. Good job.

    iconindustries
     
  20. Pelao

    Pelao Mu-43 Top Veteran

    959
    Feb 3, 2010
    Ontario, Canada
    Thank you. :redface: