IBIS and shutter speed question

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by dpswbab, Feb 27, 2015.

  1. dpswbab

    dpswbab Mu-43 Regular

    85
    May 30, 2014
    On the various brands of DSLR with optical stabilization in the lens, I have seen multiple threads that say you should turn off the stabilization function at shutter speeds above 1/500 second because the movement detection works at a frequency of 1000 hertz, with two measurements necessary to detect any camera/lens motion. Does anyone know what the sampling frequency is with Olympus' IBIS system? Thanks.
     
  2. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    The Oly IBIS will turn itself off if the shutter speed is high enough.

    Barry
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Informative Informative x 1
  3. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    Really? Where do they state this?
     
  4. T N Args

    T N Args Agent Photocateur

    Dec 3, 2013
    Adelaide, Australia
    call me Arg
    If true, that is very welcome, very sensible, and long overdue, as long as it stays on during the composing stage with long lenses for example, and only turns itself off once the shutter is pressed.
     
  5. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    I've read it in other posts, not sure if it's documented.

    Barry
     
  6. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    I do not think this is true. I still can hear IBIS noise even at 1/250s @12mm.
    But when I turn on lens OIS, then IBIS stops (lens priority is on). Even if I turn on OIS with half-pressed shutter and working IBIS - IBIS turns off immidiatelly.
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2015
  7. b_rubenstein

    b_rubenstein Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 20, 2012
    Melbourne, FL
    First off, I doubt that all DSLR stabilization systems sample at 1Khz, or that anyone who posts on the internet knows first hand what the details are of these systems. It's probably all reverse engineering educated guess work and is more than ten years old, but keeps getting regurgitated.

    The most important thing is that even if true, it doesn't predict the visible effect on a picture. Numbers that don't correlate to visible impact are in the same realm of calculating how many angles can fit on the head of a pin. The numbers are just useless. What one needs to do is take multiple hand held shots, at the same shutter speeds, over a range of shutter speeds with IBIS on and off. To come up with any truly useful knowledge testing, rather than analysis, has to be done
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  8. physicsdude

    physicsdude Mu-43 Regular

    121
    Feb 11, 2014
    KS
    Jan
    That would be horrible if the IBIS wouldnt work at 1/250 of a second..
    I think people are talking about very different stuff right now. I do believe that barry13 is talking about much longer exposure more on the seconds or minute scale.
    I havent read anything about tis limitations but given the fact that an IBIS running for 5secs is doing the same work as 5000 shots at 1/1000 of a second, I can see some sort of limitations that would be good to keep it going more than 5000 shots or anything close.
     
  9. barry13

    barry13 Super Moderator; Photon Wrangler

    Mar 7, 2014
    Southern California
    Barry
    I was talking about very fast shutter speeds...

    I can't find any solid info online, so one could do some test shots at high shutter speeds with and without IBIS, and see if there's any difference in the images. Don't use a tripod, use something much more solid, and delayed or remote shutter release.

    Or email Oly support.

    Barry
     
  10. physicsdude

    physicsdude Mu-43 Regular

    121
    Feb 11, 2014
    KS
    Jan
    I was missing my Saturday noon coffee, sorry I was the one who was misreading it :)
     
  11. budeny

    budeny Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 4, 2014
    Boulder, CO
    1/250 is more than enough for 12mm, but things are the same even for 1/4000s.