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iAuto vs. P

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by drd1135, Sep 9, 2011.

  1. drd1135

    drd1135 Zen Snapshooter

    Mar 17, 2011
    Southwest Virginia
    Steve
    My friend is using my E-PL1 on a trip and asked about iAuto. When I want automatic I use P since I can still change settings. Consequently, I really don't know how iAuto performs. Under what conditions would iAuto produce significantly different results from P?
     
  2. pancake

    pancake Mu-43 Regular

    107
    Aug 10, 2010
    UK south East
    I dont use it often but it seems to work well. I use P mode too for that little bit of control.
     
  3. anidel

    anidel Mu-43 Regular

    166
    May 13, 2011
    Twickenham, Uk
    iAuto is like Manual for dummies.

    When in iAuto click on the OK button to show the options you can change and then the INFO button until you see a bar on the right with colorful icons. I don't know how that is called.

    However here the camera lets you choose blurness/sharpness etc in "words" rather than photographic terms.
     
  4. crsnydertx

    crsnydertx Mu-43 Top Veteran

    995
    Dec 31, 2010
    Houston, TX
    Chuck
    Not sure if Oly iAuto works the same way, but on the Panasonics I use, the mode works very well in contrasty light, e.g., bright sunlight with harsh shadows. iAuto "lifts" the shadows, creating a more balanced image. The same effect can be achieved in post-processing, but for those who want to use images straight OOC, iAuto ought to be considered a useful tool in the arsenal.
     
  5. ~tc~

    ~tc~ Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Oct 22, 2010
    Houston, TX
    On Panasonic cameras iA is more like an automated "scene mode". It analyzes the scene and then sets either the flower/macro scene mode, landscape scene mode, portrait mode, etc - and all the tweaks that go with them (including film mode/photo style, flash, ISO, etc).

    P mode is more like an automated manual mode, where the light meter is used to determine the appropriate aperture and shutter speed, and everything else is required to be set by the photographer.

    iA will give you the best possible chance of a sucessful image, but if you want more, you will rapidly find yourself trapped up against its limitations.
     
  6. audiophile

    audiophile New to Mu-43

    1
    Sep 12, 2011
    For me the iAuto means i can quickly recover from manual settings (from art-shooting static things) to shooting people very quickly.

    This is because i tend to set manually ISO, focus, aperture & speed when i'm shooting the environment. Making sure all of these settings are optimally set for dynamic people can either take too much time and the moment will pass or then i forget one or two of these and i get a bad picture).

    I tend to leave these settings on manual. Then, when i (suddenly!) start shooting people after manual shooting, the first pictures are best to start with the iAuto.

    All of these settings (ISO, focus, aperture & speed) will be automatically set for very quick shooting. This is to make sure the moment will not pass before i've shot it.

    After when i've documented the moment with iA (and IF the people still are there to shoot), i start to think more creatively and using the more manual programs again.