I want iMac resolution on a Windows Computer

Discussion in 'Image Processing' started by digitalandfilm, Nov 21, 2012.

  1. digitalandfilm

    digitalandfilm Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 18, 2011
    I love the way my photo's look on the iMac (2560 x 1440?) as compared to the 1920 x 1080 on my current computer.

    How can I get the same resolution on my Windows computer???
  2. LeoS

    LeoS Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Aug 6, 2012
    Buy a high res screen from Dell or Apple. I think you may need dual dvi connectors for screens above 1080p, not sure about hdmi.
  3. iGonzoid

    iGonzoid Mu-43 Veteran

    Feb 6, 2011
    Tasmania, Australia
    At the risk of sounding flippant... next time you upgrade, buy a Mac. [Mac user since 1986.] Seriously, get a 3rd party monitor to fit your PC, of a suitable resolution and quality — compare brands.
  4. shizlefonizle

    shizlefonizle Mu-43 Veteran

    Apr 21, 2012
    If youre on a budget check out monitors from Korean brands on ebay or Frys. Theyre essentially the same panel as brand names. The Dells and Apples take the best panels (lets say A+ grade) and panels that they didn't take (A or A- grade) get sold by Korean companies for as low as $250. Of course at that price there are chances of dead pixels (fixable) and light bleeding. For more peace of mind, Frys sells a Korean brand called Simian (sp?) for $400 which comes with a manufacturers warranty. I had one briefly and they were gorgeous and very comparable to similar monitors from Apple and Dell.
  5. meyerweb

    meyerweb Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Sep 5, 2011
    In addition to a monitor, you'll need a video card that supports the resolution you're looking for.
  6. Promit

    Promit Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 6, 2011
    Baltimore, MD
    Real Name:
    Promit Roy
    It would have to be an exceedingly old card to not support 2560.

    The standard 2560 choice in the PC world is the Dell U27. The latest model is this one, which just happens to be on sale:
    Dell UltraSharp U2713HM 27" Monitor with LED Details
    That particular model is sRGB gamut, there are more expensive AdobeRGB models as well.

    Alternately, you can buy one of the Korean panels for about half the price. This article talks about them:
    Those 27-inch IPS displays from Korea are for real - The Tech Report - Page 1
    Cannot offer any personal experience, but people seem happy.

    Either way, I recommend you budget for a screen calibration tool as well.
  7. digitalandfilm

    digitalandfilm Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jul 18, 2011
    I just read the spec's of my video card:

    ATI Radeon HD 4600

    Two integrated DVI display outputs
    Primary supports 18-, 24-, and 30-bit digital displays at all resolutions up to 1920x1200 (single-link DVI) or 2560x1600 (dual-link DVI)2

    What does "dual-link" mean? Two cables??
  8. dav1dz

    dav1dz Mu-43 Top Veteran

    Nov 6, 2012
    Rule of thumb: Any discrete GPU after 2005 will pretty much support 2K resolutions. Monitors that supports that resolution haven't been available at reasonable prices until recent few years so few are using them.

    A dual-link DVI port is just a single DVI port but using all of the pins in the connector. It does not mean using two separate DVI ports.

    Correspondingly a monitor that supports 2K resolutions will accept dual-link DVI connections as well.

    You do however need to buy a dual-link DVI cable. Most new ones are dual-link so just plug in an existing one that you have for now and see if it works. Nothing will blow up. If you don't get resolution that high it's because the cable needs to be replaced.

    Your monitor might even come with cables, depending on the manufacturer.


    This chart should show what the ports will look like. DVI-I means it'll run in both digital and analog mode. DVI-D is digital only and DVI-A is analog only. Obviously dual-link requires a digital connection. When DVI-I runs in dual-link mode it's a digital-only connection.
    • Like Like x 3
  9. RDM

    RDM Mu-43 All-Pro

    Nice..I just learned something today