I like my omd photos in evf but not on my screen

PantelisMor

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HI guys. Everytime i take picture with oly, i am glad with the result i see in evf. In the meanwile when i see pictures in my pc screen. I see something different. I am not so happy. The real result is what i see in my oly or in my pc. Has to do with my screen or my pc. Or it's logical this difference. Thx a lot for once again. And sorry for my english....
 

yakky

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Both screens are a bit saturated and warm by default. Adjust them to look like your color calibrated monitor, then start playing with jpeg colors and or white balance shifts.
 

orfeo

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Obviously the PC monitr plays a big role! Look at the price of the graphic/photo editing lcd monitor and you will get the idea why it is an important tool to have.
 

Fmrvette

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Concur on calibrating monitor if you haven't already.

I used an inexpensive ColorMunki

http://www.amazon.com/X-Rite-CMUNSML-ColorMunki-Smile/dp/B009APMNB0/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1402698170&sr=8-1&keywords=X-Rite+CMUNSML+ColorMunki+Smile

and was surprised at how 'warm' my monitor was before calibration. I wasn't sold on the process until I opened photos 'before' and 'after' and saw the difference. Using the color profile also helped with getting the colors closer when printing.

Are you seeing consistent issues with the images? Too warm? Color casting?

Regards,

Jim
 

pdk42

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There's a massive difference in the quality of PC monitors. Make sure you get one that uses something called In-Plane Switching (IPS) and then make sure you get a calibrator (Spyder, ColorMunki etc). A good monitor and proper calibration is the starting point for getting accurate colour reproduction.
 

lightmonkey

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most everything looks better downscaled. higher apparent sharpness, apparent noise cleanliness
 

m4c

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I do feel a little bit ashamed, when I see, how many of you do take monitor calibration really seriously, for me the calibration was just by the eye.
As Eric wrote, if you shoot in raw, you will get jpeg preview, but I must say that, even when I shoot in jpeg and zoom the image on lcd screen it looked more sharp and less noisy, than it look on computer. The real question is what exactly is the problem here, colours, exposure, sharpness... ?
 

piggsy

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The embedded JPG in the raws is will be lower res (3200x2400) and I believe it's not even a 'good' JPG, in terms of compression quality. If you're using a 'fast' image viewer like Irfanview, it won't properly decode the raw, just display the JPG embedded in the raw.
 

Fmrvette

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...for me the calibration was just by the eye.
Me too, until I started having issues printing - I was finally convinced to calibrate the monitor and was really surprised at the difference between what my "eye" setup was and what the calibrated setup looked like. I wasn't a believer until I actually saw it :biggrin:. The calibration didn't help on the sharpness end (as far as I can determine, anyway) and the ColorMunki device doesn't reset the brightness - but the color cast is completely different than what I had dialed in by "eye". I had the monitor much too warm - once I used the 'calibrated' settings the photos looked (and printed) much better. (I'm currently using Elements 12 for editing and the Canon Print plug in for printing).


...even when I shoot in jpeg and zoom the image on lcd screen it looked more sharp and less noisy, than it look on computer. The real question is what exactly is the problem here, colours, exposure, sharpness... ?
What software are you using to view the photos on the computer?

Regards,

Jim
 

lightmonkey

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Like I said, you don't see noise in low-res and the downscaling process increases apparent sharpness (or, rather, it masks bluriness).
 

PantelisMor

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I have listen for calibration. But for now i cant spend 100 € to buy this calibrator.. I use lightroom for edit and view. Sometimes only for view my solution is infanview...
 

ccunningham

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You'll probably be really surprised if you calibrate your monitor. I bought the cheapest colormunki kit and after seeing the difference, now I wish I had bought a calibrator sooner. Also turn down brightness/contrast some. My laptop came out of the box with those settings ramped up as high as they could go, and every photo looked bad until I cranked the brightness and contrast down. I think the high default settings are to make the screen sharper and brighter, but it does not help make photos look better.
 

Fmrvette

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I have listen for calibration. But for now i cant spend 100 € to buy this calibrator.. I use lightroom for edit and view. Sometimes only for view my solution is infanview...
Yep, the calibrators are nice to have but definitely add to the price of the hobby!

Do prints of your photos look bad compared to what you see on the camera screen? Can you post a sample jpg here in the forums?

I'll try to take some shots with my E-M5 and check out the screen view with what I see on the computer monitor and see if I experience the same issue you're having...

Regards,

Jim
 

Fri13

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There's a massive difference in the quality of PC monitors. Make sure you get one that uses something called In-Plane Switching (IPS) and then make sure you get a calibrator (Spyder, ColorMunki etc). A good monitor and proper calibration is the starting point for getting accurate colour reproduction.
IPS panel isn't insurance for color accuracy. There are IPS panels what does have only 6bit colors. Bought once such and it had two ugly steps in different color gradients and never could get them off. changing display white balance and other settings only moved the steps to other scale.

almost two weeks tried to fix it, with color calibration and manual adjustments until I was forced to return it to store as I found out the technology site what lists panels what display manufacturers use and it was IPS but 6bit.

only way to get good is to test it.

bought now a new one, cheap 4k with 10bit colors and it is truly amazing.
 

Fri13

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Hi,

1. once you've calibrated a monitor, is it calibrated at an OS-level (Windows 8 / Mac OS / Linux), or is it per application?

2. does anyone rent calibrators?

Barry
Nothing is calibrated on OS level. The calibration happens in graphic server/windowing environment level, way over OS.

The calibration is so on for everything, but special applications can request then a custom profile for own. Meaning you can have two applications running and both use custom color profile for prints (other for inkjet printer, another for photoshop devices) and still have a own profile for display in other applications.

The good thing is that we can copy the color profile to each system individually so calibration is required only to be done on one system.

And there are few who rents those devices but you want to buy a own one and such one what has the light sensor on it. Then keep device plugged on your computer and the device does read out your environment light and adjust screen for given situation.

And people are way too often working with color calibrated displays but in totally wrong environment. The room needs to be dark, and I mean it is painted middle gray and then light what is used in room is color calibrated as well and light power is just enough to see well. It is almost like standing in moonlight trough clear sky.

And it feels like that, it is cold light and in time it starts taking on nerves to work in such room as each color pops up on monitor and in the room.

The difference between color calibrated room to normal room is like a day and night. More important than screen calibration itself if working with prints.
 
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