I don't get it.....

Discussion in 'Adapted Lenses' started by zensu, Apr 10, 2016.

  1. zensu

    zensu An Old Fool

    Aug 8, 2012
    Southeastern USA
    Bobby
    ..... I've seen numerous Nikon to Sony lens adapters that retain autofocus and image stabilization via the lenses O.I.S. but have never seen a Nikon to m43s' adapter that can retain these functions. I've seen Canon adapters that can do this with Canon lenses and m43. What's up with Nikon lenses and m43s' or have I missed something?
    Bobby
     
  2. Raptor7

    Raptor7 Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Dec 21, 2014
    Madrid, Spain
    AFAIK, most Nikon lenses doesn't have an autofocus motor, as the motor is in the camera. Just some APSC lenses (made for the cheaper cameras, that doesn't have autofocus motor) have the motor. Maybe that can be the reason...
     
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  3. DaveEP

    DaveEP Mu-43 Top Veteran

    684
    Sep 20, 2014
    York, UK
    Most of the decent Nikon lenses rely on the AF motor in the body, which is why the D3/4/5 can focus faster than some of the cheaper bodies (beefier motor).

    Some of the later models do have AF motors but last time I looked it was still the minority.

    Perhaps there aren't enough AF versions for the M43 adapter makers to think about, plus they'll then get the blame for lens 'x' autofocusing but lens 'y' not (no AF motor) since many people won't understand the difference.
     
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  4. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    I disagree with the statements that there are not enough AF Nikon lenses that rely on the in camera focus motor. There are plenty of lenses out there, primes and zooms that are AF-S, which is Nikon's version of in lens micro motors.

    Nikon does not readily share the inner workings of their lens tech, which makes it difficult for this parties to make lenses or adapters that are guaranteed to work properly with Nikon bodies. Sigma had had issues with this compatibility for a long time.

    I think it all comes down to having a manufacturer make the product. A lot of these products are relatively new and are being honed with other mounts first. I'm sure if it turns out to be economically feasible, a Nikon centric version will be seen eventually.

    **edited to correct spelling and auto correct mistakes
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2016
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  5. Raptor7

    Raptor7 Mu-43 Regular

    86
    Dec 21, 2014
    Madrid, Spain
    The problem with the AF-S is that, usually, they are the cheaper lenses, as the best cameras has in-body af motor, so they don't need it. So, very few people would want to adapt those lenses for their cameras. Most people would like to use the best Nikon lenses, and those haven't af motor.
     
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  6. jpig

    jpig Mu-43 Regular

    88
    Oct 21, 2011
    There's a good bit of misinformation in this thread. Most of Nikon's current lens line-up, both APS-C and full frame, consists of AF-S lenses, which have the focus motor in the lens. Nikon has not introduced a new lens without a focus motor in nearly a decade, and they have gradually been replacing the older AF-D lenses, which were focused by a screw drive powered by a motor in the camera body, with new AF-S versions. There may still be a few of the older AF-D lenses in production, but they are becoming scarce in the current Nikon line-up. The more expensive, "pro" Nikon camera bodies have a focusing motor not for the current or the best Nikon lenses, but rather for backwards compatibility, in order to be able to use the vast catalog of older autofocus lenses, which can often be bought used for considerably less than the current AF-S versions (depending on the lens, of course; some older lenses have a cult following, and some of the new AF-S lenses are not that expensive). It probably is true that the total number of AF-D lenses in existence is greater than the number of AF-S lenses, but that is merely a result of how long each was or has been in production. It is certainly inaccurate to claim that Nikon's optically best lenses are all AF-D or all AF-S. It depends on the lens, the optical quality of which does not necessarily have anything to do with how it's focused.
     
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  7. MNm43

    MNm43 Mu-43 Regular

    105
    Mar 19, 2014
    I was just going to post the same question . . ..

    jpig above is right on the mark. While there are some fine AF-D lenses that lack a focussing motor, there are some extraordinarily good optics that are AF-S -both zooms (14-28 2.8, 300 2.8, 70-200 2.8, 300 f4, etc.) and primes (24 1.8g, 60 2.8g macro, 105 2.8 macro etc). I'm holding onto my 70-200 f4 because it is relatively small, relatively light, sharp and contrasty.

    I assumed the lack of 'smart' adapters was because Nikon's internal signaling is proprietary. If only Nikon would come out with an adapter . . . I'd buy it in a heartbeat.
     
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  8. Turbofrog

    Turbofrog Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 21, 2014
    The world's first Nikon AF adapter only came out from Commlite about 4 months ago, so it's still a very new product. It's no surprise that they would dedicate their engineering and production to Sony first, for lots of reasons:

    1) Sony is FF, so people are more likely to use Nikon FF lenses.
    2) Sony has a very limited lens line-up.
    3) Sony has on-sensor PDAF which should make for more reliable functionality with AF-S than the CDAF that all M4/3 bodies except the E-M1 use. Most Nikon focus motors will not be able to properly handle the requirements of CDAF focussing. In fact, that's the case for most DSLR lenses generally. Canon's STM lenses are the exception, which is why they are most commonly recommended for videography where CDAF is obligatory when using DSLRs.
     
  9. MaK543

    MaK543 Mu-43 Regular

    139
    May 1, 2012
    MD USA
    I think the lack of fully automated Nikon lens adopter has more to do with
    • Physical design of Nikon F mount. Canon's EOS mount is fully electronic, which makes it easier to adopt to MLC. Nikon's F mount, on the other hand, is not fully electronic. Nikon retained the legacy aperture lever when the F mount went electronic.. The side way facing electronic contacts also adds challenge to adopter design.
    • A lot fewer Nikon shooters than Canon out there
    I would not use comparable Nikon lenses on m43 bodies because the lenses are big and heavy compare to native m43 lenses. But I would use them on Sony A7 series bodies because Sony FE lenses are just as big and heavy as the Nikkors.
     
  10. gryphon1911

    gryphon1911 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Mar 13, 2014
    Central Ohio, USA
    Andrew
    They are not the "cheaper" lenses - the higher end bodies have the screw drive in it for maximum compatibility with older lenses. Nikon has not abandoned their legacy lens users.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2016
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  11. MaK543

    MaK543 Mu-43 Regular

    139
    May 1, 2012
    MD USA
    I fully agree. In addition, newer Nikon lenses can be mounted on older F mount cameras and function up to the camera body's capabilities, with some exceptions. Pentax retained similar legacy compatibility. However, Canon dumped their FL user when they introduced FD mount in 1971, then dumped FD users when they introduced EOS mount in 1987..:eek-31:
     
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  12. Joe Smith

    Joe Smith Mu-43 Regular

    128
    Mar 6, 2016
    So is Canon's. Sigma and similiar third party lens manufacturers just hacked the protocol. This is why Sigma lenses usually need a firmware upgrade with each new camera body. And I suspect this is the reason why there are no autofocus lenses from Zeiss for Canon or Nikon.
     
  13. dhazeghi

    dhazeghi Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 6, 2010
    San Jose, CA
    Dara
    I know of only 2, and IIRC neither have shipped more than a handful of test 'beta' units. Which are you referring to?

    (Also, Sony is a more obvious platform for adapting full-frame lenses. A 2x crop factor makes a lot of lenses not so interesting).
     
  14. zensu

    zensu An Old Fool

    Aug 8, 2012
    Southeastern USA
    Bobby
    I'm sorry, I guess I should really state that I'm thinking of the Metabones type adapters. There are a couple I've seen during the last year by more economically minded Asian manufacturers (than Metabones) that allow more capability with Canon lenses than Nikkors but as another photographer reminded me not all AF Nikkors are all electronic mount.
     
  15. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    Actually y'all have it wrong. It's because Canon lens are far superior to anything Nikon could even think of putting out. So may as well adapt the best if you are going to adapt.
     
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  16. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I don't believe there is much truth in that, but certainly Canon has the largest AF lens library and largest number of lenses out in the wild by a large margin. Also, Canon scrapped all FD compatibility and never used a screw-drive, so all lenses have their own motors and are controlled the same way. So it is easier to design an adapter with very wide compatibility.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2016
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  17. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    I don't know why people boo-hoo Nikon's aperture lever. When your lens AF stops working in 20-40 years and that lens isn't being manufactured anymore, at least with the lever you'll have some sort of aperture control for some future camera to use it on. The all electronic lenses will end up in a landfill somewhere!
     
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  18. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    There is definitely truth to that. But on the other hand, it is very unlikely that mechanically controlled lenses will ever adapt to mirrorless or other future cameras outside the native brand. Canon has already shown it is essentially future proof. Sigma has a new adapter that makes Canon EF lenses work better on Sony than they do on Canon!

    And if we just want a mechanically controlled lens, then why bother paying extra for the newer AF varieties?
     
  19. Jonathan F/2

    Jonathan F/2 Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Aug 10, 2011
    Los Angeles, CA
    Nikon already has shown that aperture lever lenses with AF-S motors work fine with the Nikon 1 FT-1 adapter. They've also acknowledged that mirrorless is gaining traction (from a recent DPReview interview), so it's only a matter of time before they release some sort of big sensor mirrorless body.

    Not to mention Sony is having some issues with their lenses being too big, so the size advantage sort of goes out the door. Also the new Nikon FF bodies are great. The D750 for example feels very lean for a DSLR and the AF and image output is amazingly good.

    The upcoming D500 is implementing a first with CDAF AF fine tuning with live view, so Nikon is trickling some mirrorless based tech into their DSLRs.

    I honestly think if Olympus/Panasonic did a FF camera while keeping in flavor of a 4:3 ratio sensor and lenses to match, they could make an awesome FF system. I extensively used the Sony A7 and the 24mp sensor is amazingly good. Unfortunately Sony's ergonomics, interface, mechanics and lenses are not up to Oly/Pan refinement.
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2016
  20. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Yeah, but I said "outside the native brand". What are the odds anyone bothers to make an adapter with an aperture lever and a screwdrive motor for a Nikon lens to mount on a Sony or some future Canon mirrorless or whatever.

    And just the fact that Nikon lenses come in so many varieties makes adaptation more difficult. You have F mount with nothing, F mount with aperture levers and no AF, lenses with levers and a screw AF, lenses with levers and internal AF motors, and finally lenses with internal electronic AF and aperture. So there's a lot more logic and engineering involved.
     
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