How well do Olympus Weather Resistant lenses shed water?

Discussion in 'Native Lenses' started by DeoreDX, Jan 20, 2016.

  1. DeoreDX

    DeoreDX Mu-43 Veteran

    208
    Mar 13, 2013
    Alabama
    Specifically how well do the front elements shed water? I normally don't use protective filters but I'm making a a weather resistant setup with my E-M1 and a 14-150II. I'm trying to decide if I should order a MRC coated filter to put in front of the lens just to shed water.
     
  2. Phocal

    Phocal Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jan 3, 2014
    I shoot in the rain a lot and have not had any problems or really noticed anything. I don't use protective filters either, but I do always have the lens hood on.
     
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  3. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I use B&W MRC UV filters and lens hoods on my 12-40 Pro and 50-200 SWD lenses. Was glad to have the filter on the 12-40 Pro w/EM1 recently during a winter trip to the Pacific NW. My nephew hit the camera with a big snowball face on and at another time, the camera fell into the snow, because I lost my balance in fairly deep snow (not used to that being from Hawaii!). Lens hoods didn't help there. Both times, I just brushed and blew the snow off and thankfully no scratches on the filter. Would not have been happy if the front element had gotten hit. Plus, lots of water from melting snowflakes. Lens and camera (EM1) came through fine.

    Have also used the EM1 w/50-200 and MMF-3 adaptor in a rainstorm. Came through with no problems.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2016
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  4. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 Monkey with a camera.

    May 19, 2013
    Canada
    I shot pandas in China in the pouring rain for 6 hours with my E-M5 and the 12-50. The only two problems I encountered was that after about 4 hours the EVF fogged up (no lasting issues, though), and the front element was a pain in the neck to keep clear of water...
     
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  5. DeoreDX

    DeoreDX Mu-43 Veteran

    208
    Mar 13, 2013
    Alabama
    I've never owned a MRC nano coated filter but my understanding is they will bead up the water and the water will slide right off. If the Olympus glass doesn't exhibit this behavior then it might be worthwhile to have one on the lens while in wet conditions.

     
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  6. Holoholo55

    Holoholo55 Mu-43 All-Pro

    Aug 13, 2014
    Honolulu, HI
    Walter
    I feel the B&Ws are better in that regard than a lot of other filters. I also have Hoya multicoated filters and they're more difficult to clean and keep clean than the B&Ws. The latter are more expensive, but worth it, IMHO. Hoya, Kenko, and Sigma are producing filters that are resistant to water and oil like the B&W, but they're as expensive or even more than the B&W.
     
  7. Jfrader

    Jfrader Guest

    My $0.02, use the filter. I am partial to Hoya and B+W but any high end filter will put your mind at ease and make cleaning easier. The use of protection filters is a source of huge disagreement here and on other photography boards but for bad conditions or inclement weather, I would always counsel using one.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 21, 2016
  8. mcasan

    mcasan Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 26, 2014
    Atlanta
    Use nice deep hoods such as on the 40-150 Pro and 300 Pro.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2016
  9. zensu

    zensu An Old Fool

    Aug 8, 2012
    Southeastern USA
    Bobby
    I like the B&Ws' because they always use brass filter threads which will not bind up if you want to switch filters or use more than one. I honestly don't know if the others have this feature or not.
    PS, B&W step up/down filter adapters are made with aluminum filter threads so for my adapter rings I end up having to pay for Heliopan adapters because they are the only ones that I can find that have non-binding brass filter threads.
     
  10. LowriderS10

    LowriderS10 Monkey with a camera.

    May 19, 2013
    Canada
    Thanks for the suggestion, I may buy a UV filter strictly for wet weather shooting.

    I used to buy filters for EVERYTHING...partially to protect the lens...guess what? In all my years of amateur and professional shooting, not once did they protect the front element from anything major. I quickly realized that I was wasting my money on filters...even the more expensive ones (I only used Hoya's top of the line and B+W) tended to get scratched up far easier than front elements (just with sand, etc) and really messed up long exposure shots at night (small aperture)...when I sold all my DSLR lenses and got into M4/3, I went filterless...zero regrets so far, not a mark on any of my lenses (and I saved hundreds of dollars!!!). But...if it helps in wet conditions, I'll pick up a UV filter to toss on the 12-50 so I can shoot easier in the rain...thanks!!! :)
     
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  11. PacNWMike

    PacNWMike Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Dec 5, 2014
    Salish Sea
    guess?
    I don't see the point of filters either. The only thing that works in the rain is keeping the drops off the front element and a hood and/or some sort of cap is best. Water on a filter is way worse than on the front element because they sit farther from the sensor and spots are more likely to be visible at any given f#. Use a wide aperture and keep the lens pointing level or down. Shield with hand or whatever.
     
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  12. agiyo

    agiyo New to Mu-43

    5
    Jun 5, 2013
    I floated the Grand Ronde River in NE Oregon in a 1-man raft through Class III and IV rapids with my EM5 and 12-60 SWD on an MMF3 adapter. It was out where I could get to it for photos, not in a protective container, and the only problem was first thing in the morning, when the inside of the finder and lens would fog up.

    Protective filters are necessary in salt water and blowing sand etc., but I never use them unnecessarily because they are two more surfaces to catch debris or cause flare, they protrude out where the lens hood can't protect them as well as the curved front element of the lens, and because they are separated, even that little bit, from the lens, anything on them has higher likelihood of becoming visible on your images, especially at higher apertures like f/16 or f/22.

    It's strictly a personal choice, but I've been doing this since 1959, might as well share my experience.

    One other thing since we're talking about moisture or whatever on the optical surface: Learn to clean them properly, gently, and never use the lens tissue I still see in camera stores, that promises to "polish" the surface! Never! That tissue was for uncoated eye glasses and will cut the coating right off your photo equipment! I've used pure cotton for decades; in a pinch, a well-washed t-shirt, and the only time my lens coating has been damaged was when I covered a mine disaster inside the mine, and we got sand blasted. Always blow off what you can, then gently, gently clean with pure cotton, not a synthetic. Your lens and your photo budget will love you.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2016
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