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How to Set Up OMD E-M5 for Pre-Chimping?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by Dave Jenkins, Jan 4, 2014.

  1. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins Mu-43 Veteran

    How can I set up my OMD-5 so that I can see the image in the EVF before the shot as it will appear after the shot (pre-chimping)? Just turning on Live View Boost is not doing it for me. Is there something I'm missing? I think my camera was doing this at one time, but apparently I unknowingly pushed the wrong button somewhere along the line.
     
  2. Turn OFF Live View Boost.
     
  3. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins Mu-43 Veteran

    Okay, I turned off Live View Boost, but that still doesn't do it for me. It's okay in fairly good light, but pointing my camera into a darker area of my living room, it's still just as dark in my EVF when I put light pressure on the shutter release. But then, when I actually take the picture, it is well-exposed. My understanding was that the whole point of pre-chimping is to be able to judge the final exposure before the fact.
     
  4. MajorMagee

    MajorMagee Mu-43 All-Pro

    Feb 24, 2011
    Dayton, OH
    What mode are you shooting in?
     
  5. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins Mu-43 Veteran

    I shoot mostly in Auto and Program modes, sometimes in Manual.
     
  6. gochugogi

    gochugogi Mu-43 Veteran

    I have no answers but love the term "pre-chimp." Kinda sorta mayhaps the lemur of photographic technics.
     
  7. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    You can set one of your Fn (function) buttons to Preview in Menu *B under Button/Dial, but it is a DoF preview (depth of field) for the selected aperture that would normally be set in Aperture Priority or Manual. It would also show you if it is bright enough or too bright when using Manual too, but that should be checked against the meter reading &/or Histogram (but with Live View Boost turned off).
     
  8. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The exposure preview does not work accurately for very slow shutter speeds.

    The camera maintains a fixed refresh rate for the EVF, which limits how long an exposure each frame of the live view can be from using the electronic shutter. Once it gets dark enough, a limit will be reached where at the slowest electronic shutter speed for live view, it's impossible for the sensor to capture anything useful, and electronic gain (i.e. boosting ISO) will just reveal noise.
     
    • Like Like x 4
  9. Dave Jenkins

    Dave Jenkins Mu-43 Veteran

    Thanks, wjiang. That is not the answer I wanted to hear, but it sounds like the correct answer. :frown:
     
  10. Dch

    Dch Mu-43 Regular

    58
    Nov 20, 2013
    Well, if you turn on highlights and shadows warnings you can know what the exposure will be like even if you don't see it accurately represented. It's one feature i REALLY like and a huge advantage over optical viewfinders.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. m43_user

    m43_user Mu-43 Regular

    143
    Aug 4, 2010
    Maybe it's different on the E-M1 and I can't remember how it was on my E-M5 (no longer have it), but I just tested this while looking through the EVF on my E-M1. When I move the camera around from a bright room and then to a dark room, the live view changes to reflect the exposure I'd actually get when I take the picture. I took a few shots to verify. What I see in the live view EVF is what I see when I actually take the photo. Maybe it's different on the E-M5. I don't know. Just thought I'd share how it is on the E-M1
     
  12. Ross the fiddler

    Ross the fiddler Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    The E-M1 has variable back lighting for the EVF whereas the E-M5 doesn't, so there will be some difference there.
     
  13. pdk42

    pdk42 One of the "Eh?" team

    Jan 11, 2013
    Leamington Spa, UK
    The limitation is worse if you've got high refresh rate enabled on the EVF. Turn it to 'normal' and you'll get a wider range of realistic exposure pre-chimping.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. DougVaughn

    DougVaughn Mu-43 Regular

    96
    Oct 30, 2013
    Franklin, TN
    Doug Vaughn
    Hmmm... I must have something set wrong on my E-M1 because I have the same problem. When in a dark area, I can barely see what I'm pointing at and focusing on. I don't remember it ever being an issue with my E-M5, but I no longer have it. So many custom settings that I could have screwed up just about anything. :smile:
     
  15. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Veteran

    380
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    You must be in Manual (dial on top) or have Manual Exposure selected with the dial on top set to the Movie Camera Icon, With either of those options, changes you make in ISO, Aperture, or Shutter Speed will cause your EVF image or LCD image to lighten or darken appropriately.

    In Program or any of the other Auto modes (A - Aperture Priority, or S - Shutter Priority) the EVF or LCD image will show you only the "perfect" expsoure those modes will try to obtain for you. I just had retina surgery this morning so I can't go to my E-M5 to hunt for any specific menu items that need to be configured for this. On the Panasonic's it is CONSTANT PREVUE set to ON.
     
  16. DougVaughn

    DougVaughn Mu-43 Regular

    96
    Oct 30, 2013
    Franklin, TN
    Doug Vaughn
    The manual mode explains it for me. Now I remember when I was having the problem. It was when shooting with flash in manual mode that I could barely see the subject through the viewfinder. If shooting a lens or something else for sale, I set my shutter at 1/60, aperture at f/5.8, and adjust flash power accordingly. Thanks for jogging my memory and helping me realize why it didn't work so well.
     
  17. Bif

    Bif Mu-43 Veteran

    380
    May 28, 2012
    San Angelo TX
    Bruce Foreman
    Yes, that gets a lot of folks. The camera is showing you what exposure you would get with no flash at those settings. There's really no way to "prevue" the effect of the flash short of taking a flash shot and reviewing it.

    Think how lucky we are to have gear that shows us the result immediately after taking the shot. Back in the "good ole" Kodachrome days we had to "hone" instincts to get proper exposure because we couldn't see the results until a week or so later.