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How to override maximum sync speed with Yongnuo trigger?

Discussion in 'Lighting Forum' started by TonyZhang, Oct 5, 2014.

  1. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    I have a Panasonic g6, two Yongnuo Yn-560iiis and the new Yn-560tx trigger. It all works well but I am limited to 1/160th of a second as that is the maximum sync speed of my camera. The trigger and flashes sync with my Ricoh GR up to about 1/2000th or more. I shoot skateboarding, often during the day, and 1/160th of a second with these flashes just isn't enough to freeze the motion or light up the subject.

    I was wondering if there is anyway to use hypersync like with the Pocketwizard minitt1s on DSLRs. I don't mind a little bit of area the flash doesn't hit at the bottom because it will be during the day where the ambient would expose it, plus I often crop down to 3:2.

    After reading in the Yn-560tx thread I noticed that some users say they are syncing up to 1/320 or even 1/400 on their Olympus omd cameras, going past the maximum rated sync speed. Is this possible on Panasonic cameras such as the g6? As soon as the flash or trigger is mounted onto the hotshoe of the camera I am unable to push the shutter speed to anything faster than 1/160.

    Does anybody know of anyway to override the setting that prevents you from increasing your shutter speed past the max sync when a non FP/HSS flash/trigger is attached? Would it be possible to 'trick' the camera into thinking that there was no trigger or flash mounted onto the hotshoe so that you could make the shutter speed faster, but still have your flash fire? Any increase in the speed would be great, 1/200th, 1/250th, it all makes a difference.

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. eteless

    eteless Mu-43 All-Pro

    Jun 20, 2014
    I "trick" my camera by using a dumb shoe flash or disabling the electronic contacts, it means you need to use manual flash though. The reason you can push the OMD's up higher (1/500th with the E-M1) is because the actual sync speed is... 1/500th. It's electronically limited to a slower speed to allow time for TTL metering, it can't achieve this sync speed with TTL - only manual(however using manual doesn't disable the limitation).

    If you have another flash which can do HSS you can use it to optically trigger other flashes to achieve hypersync etc, however it's not really the same. I know Metz looked into making a wireless module which can interact with any of their flashes (not just one of the canon or nikon or four thirds versions at a time, all at once) and enable cross system wireless TTL however I don't know if anything fruitful has come of it (or if it was viable).

    The Ricoh RG uses a leaf shutter which syncs at all speeds.
     
  3. ThomD

    ThomD Mu-43 Veteran

    424
    Jun 1, 2013
    SF Bay Area
    I've never found a way to do this. I have your setup, plus some Metz flashes. The Metz knows how to tell the camera to use FP, the YN does not. I don't think any simple pin blocking technique will work. Of course, I'd love for somebody to correct me on this.

    One thing I did find is that if you use the Metz as an optical trigger for the YN and you have the YN at full power, you can use the YNs with FP because their burn time (at full power) is longer than the sync speed. Of course that doesn't help if you want to use the 560TX as a radio trigger.
     
  4. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    Thanks for your replies guys

    Thom, this technique would work in daylight with the on camera flash too right? If I used fp with my on camera flash at about 1/1000, would the yn560iii's in slave mode and full power respond quick enough to fire during the short exposure time? At such a high shutter speed I'm not so sure if slave mode responds quickly enough. Haven't got my setup right now so cannot test it.
     
  5. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I've done this with the E-M5 at 1/1000s at least, not sure what the max is. You'll overheat the YNs pretty quickly doing that though.
     
  6. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    That won't be an issue as for my purposes, I shoot maybe one frame every 7-8 seconds max when using flashes. Thanks, I'll give it a go, 1/1000 will be plenty sufficient, I just hope that the Yongnuos aren't so weak in daylight to the point that they don't do anything.
     
  7. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I just did a test - the YN560-III kept up all the way to the E-M5's maximum shutter speed of 1/4000s. The illumination is pretty low by then due to the high shutter speed! Note that this only worked for me in S1 mode - in S2 mode it skips the TTL pre-flashes and fires too late.
     
  8. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    Illumination! That was the word I was looking for. I'm guessing the illumination would be quite sufficient in daylight at 1/1000s then. S1 is fine. Looking forward to trying this out when I can.
     
  9. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    Also, do you have any idea how reliable is the slave mode on the yn560iiis? Does the slave sensor need to be directly facing the on camera flash? How far away would the yn560 be able to be from the camera and still fire?
     
  10. wjiang

    wjiang Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    They've been extremely (I'd say basically 100%) reliable indoors. As far as needing to face the master... Indoors, no, but outdoors, pretty much, depending on how much ambient light is hitting the front sensor. If the sensor is facing the sun then it's pretty difficult.
    The furthest I tried was about 5m in my backyard in afternoon sun, with the YN in the sun but the sensor facing towards the camera and not the sun (yay for swivel). Building a little sun hood for the sensor probably also helps. if you need the reach it probably helps if you have the master flash on a higher power and focus it at the YN sensor on tight beam. The other thing you can do is to daisy chain the YNs - have a closer one on tight beam firing at the distant one. I think these are pretty standard optical slaving tricks :p