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How strong is the e-m5 ii hot shoe?

Discussion in 'Olympus Cameras' started by TonyZhang, Sep 6, 2015.

  1. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    I have an e-m5 ii and need to use a top handle for video. Instead of a getting a big cumbersome setup, since the camera is rather small, light and well built, I chose to get a small handle that just connected at the hot shoe. This handle to be specific http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00YQD94RW?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00

    The handle feels solid when screwed onto the hotshoe tightly, there don't seem to be any problems. However, I was wondering if this is a good idea in the long run, the specs on the handle say it holds up to 9 pounds, which is reassuring, but how about the long term wear and tear on the hotshoe of the camera? It should be ok right? The only lens I would use with this handle is the Rokinon 7.5mm fisheye.
     
  2. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    I think that part of your answer will depend on how much torque is applied to the hot shoe. If you screw this into the hot shoe, and then gently mount it on something where it will move gently, then I would suspect less wear and tear. If you load this up with heavy equipment and swing the whole set-up around quickly, then you can expect that type of wear and tear to cause additional stress.

    Good luck,

    --Ken
     
  3. Sammyboy

    Sammyboy m43 Pro

    Oct 26, 2010
    Steeler Country
    ..... this is a VERY BAD idea .....
     
  4. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    I have bent my GM5 (yes, my newest camera) hotshoe due to carelessness, although the GM5 may have a feebler construction to keep size and weight down. I believe it is bolted down in the center but the edges are glued down, so the flex that bent my hotshoe popped up the adhesive on the outside edge of the hotshoe.
     
  5. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    For the low angle shots that I do, I would have the camera pointing up the whole time, so that there is less stress on the hot shoe. I wouldn't be loading anything onto the camera, just the body+rokinon 7.5mm. Movements would generally be smooth and not too rapid. I will also wrap the strap around my wrist for extra insurance. I just hope it doesn't wear down the hot shoe and this method of attachment will last.

    Is there any way to find out how the hot shoe is made without dissecting the camera? The shoe on the e-m5 ii feels very solid, it doesn't move at all, how did you bend your hot shoe?
     
  6. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Thinking about this practically, the hotshoe was designed to hold at most a large flash. The heaviest one on the compatibility list is the FL-50R, which comes in at about 500g loaded with batteries. I'm sure it isn't going to be fine at 500g and then snap off at 510g. But who knows what the absolute threshold is.

    E-M5 with the 7.5mm is about 625g. One would assume if the shoe can hold a 500g flash up, it could hold the same and hang 500g from it. So you are about 25% over spec. It's probably fine. Just don't overdo it and swing it around or start loading more lenses on there. I doubt I'd put anywhere near 9lbs mentioned on the product page for the handle.

    If you want total peace of mind, just get a tripod mount handle.
     
  7. TonyZhang

    TonyZhang Mu-43 Regular

    71
    Jul 8, 2014
    New Zealand
    Thanks for the detailed insight. Where did you read that the hotshoe was designed to hold at most a large flash? I'm going to be careful with it. I thought it wouldn't be a big deal because I see many hot shoe handles for sale and many of them are designed to hold even bigger, heavier cameras, as seen here http://g02.a.alicdn.com/kf/HTB1INQ0...-Angle-Shooting-DSLR-Camera-Rebel-T3i-T4i.jpg and in this video here , I thought surely if these handles can handle full sized dslrs, my little em5 with a small lens shouldn't be too big a deal, but now I'm not so sure.
     
  8. tkbslc

    tkbslc Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    I didn't read it anywhere. It's a hotshoe, it's designed to hold a flash. It's like asking how much weight a chair is designed to hold. It's designed to hold a person.
     
  9. agentlossing

    agentlossing Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    Jun 26, 2013
    Andrew Lossing
    Trying to fit the Oly VF1 and wedging things in to widen the prongs. Not my finest hour.

    Eventually did what I should have started off doing and took my wife's nail file to the base of the VF1. Now it fits just fine, and I sort of blame Olympus for stupidly having fatter hotshoe mounts than literally every other camera brand out there.
     
  10. Replytoken

    Replytoken Mu-43 Hall of Famer

    May 7, 2012
    Puget Sound
    Ken
    You need to be worried about the weakest link in that connection, and I suspect that would be your camera's hot shoe. These handles have metal feet that are attached very well, and their job is to fit into a shoe, which may or may not be as strong under force as a foot. And, I suspect that some of the full-sized DSLR's that are sold as professional (as opposed to prosumer or consumer grade) bodies may have shoes that are better reinforced than your Olympus, although that is speculation on my part.

    Think about the scenario that you described above for a moment. You may not be swinging your camera around, but if you are facing it upwards, your hot shoe is now carrying all the weight of the camera in that vertical position. By way of comparison, would you mount a flash and place your camera in the same position holding everything by the flash unit? Probably not, especially since most flashes have plastic feet these days, but it illustrates my point. I am not saying that you cannot do this without risk to your camera, but it is probably not an arrangement that Olympus had in mind when they designed the hot shoe, so you are doing this at your own risk. It may work out fine, and it may snap in under a minute, but unless you have an alternate arrangement and need the shot, you do not have that many choices. Personally, I would see if there are any brackets or devices that mount in the tripod socket. I suspect that is a less fragile connection point.

    Good luck,

    --Ken
     
  11. Klorenzo

    Klorenzo Mu-43 All-Pro

    Mar 10, 2014
    Lorenzo
    I would write Olympus and ask them. When I did I got a real useful thorough answer.
     
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  12. JoJo

    JoJo Mu-43 Regular

    176
    Mar 19, 2013
    Atlanta, GA
    JoJo
    The shoe is held on with tiny screws! Use a bracket.
     
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