Help with panning

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Dave
hi
I took this today with an EM1mk3 and 12-40 lens. Shot at shutter speed of 1/15 sec and aperture of 6.3. AF was set to constant and large rectangular focus point using panning to blur the background. The subject was about 20 ft from me going right to left. I used pro capture at low frame rate. Any ideas on how to get the subject in sharper focus. Thanks
Dave
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RAH

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It's hard to tell at this resolution (dictated by the forum's downsize), but he looks pretty sharp to me. I suppose this is also because it is such a stark contrast to the super-blurry background (nicely done!). I suppose using a tripod would be one way to get a steadier shot of the subject (of necessity you are using a show shutter speed, I think, although I'm not sure). Another idea would be to use the S-IS setting that is intended for this type of panning (S-IS2).
 
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first - what was your reasoning for using pro capture?

second - practice is the best solution I can give you. it looks to me like it was combination of the slow shutter speed and not panning at the same speed as the subject moving. only cure for that is lots of practice. panning is a skill that requires practice to get great results from it consistently.
 

sbm

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I agree with RAH, that's pretty good – especially at 1/15s. And Phocal's right. The only way to nail sharpness is to pan at the exact same speed as the subject. I practiced this a bit at a fair earlier this month, and it's not easy by any means.
_1067117 happy sizzlers.jpg
 

sbm

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One thing I find helpful is making sure my technique stays as consistent as possible. I try to keep my elbows tucked into my torso, so that I can rotate my body with the movement of my subject, which allows a stable base and makes it easier to match speed while minimizing wobble of the camera (using the S-IS2 stabilizing mode would likely be useful as well - forget what it's called on Panny, but I try to remember to get off 5-axis correction, which I use >90% of the time).
 

doady

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Feet seem sharper than the face too, at that resolution. So apparently the pan matched the feet more than the face.

Panning isn't just about the proper speed, but also the proper direction. You can see from the lines along the top of the photo that the panning wasn't straight. Apparently the camera or the lens lowered during the middle of the panning. Match the speed of the subject, but also match the direction that the subject is moving.
 
Joined
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Ambler Pa. Just northwest of Phila
Real Name
Dave
One thing I find helpful is making sure my technique stays as consistent as possible. I try to keep my elbows tucked into my torso, so that I can rotate my body with the movement of my subject, which allows a stable base and makes it easier to match speed while minimizing wobble of the camera (using the S-IS2 stabilizing mode would likely be useful as well - forget what it's called on Panny, but I try to remember to get off 5-axis correction, which I use >90% of the time).
Thx Sam keeping the elbows tucked in is agood tip. Your picture at the fair is very sharp. Great technique
 
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Dave
Feet seem sharper than the face too, at that resolution. So apparently the pan matched the feet more than the face.

Panning isn't just about the proper speed, but also the proper direction. You can see from the lines along the top of the photo that the panning wasn't straight. Apparently the camera or the lens lowered during the middle of the panning. Match the speed of the subject, but also match the direction that the subject is moving.
 

doady

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Oh, my mistake, I am an idiot. The lines have a U shape at the top, but inverted U shape at the bottom, so you did sort of pan straight in one direction. I'm guessing that, during the pan, you moved the lens more than the camera body. You turned the camera to the left more than shifted the entire camera to camera to the left, so the camera was kind of stationary in one place even if it remained pointed at the boy. I don't think I've ever seen that before. That's weird, it's not actually a bad effect, but it probably only works if the subject is in the centre of the frame. If you want to do a proper pan, try to keep the camera pointed in one direction and move the entire camera to keep up with the moving subject, instead of just turning the camera and moving only the lens.
 

RAH

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... If you want to do a proper pan, try to keep the camera pointed in one direction and move the entire camera to keep up with the moving subject, instead of just turning the camera and moving only the lens.
Using this technique isn't really what is considered a regular "pan," I think. A regular pan is really just turning the camera (as a pivot) and the lens actually moving to follow the subject. Moving the entire camera to follow the subject as it whizzes by is a different thing entirely, I would think.

What I'm getting at is that the S-IS2 "panning" mode might NOT be appropriate for this other type of use. I think it is intended for "regular" panning as with video. I think that all-direction IBIS (S-IS1) might be better for this other use. Try everything! Fortunately, I have very few things whizzing by me most of the time, so I can just sit here and drink my beer in peace... ;)
 

ac12

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When you are practicing, shoot SINGLE frame, not continuous.
As has been said, panning requires a LOT of practice, and is a lot harder than it looks.
The muscle control to SMOOTHLY move your body, tracking the subject, is hard.

Learning trick:
Go to a park that is next to a road.
From about 100 yards from the road, practice panning on the moving cars.
As it gets easier, move closer to the road.
 

damianmkv

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i'd say you did pretty well - the closer the subject, the more difficult it is to get sharp images

As mentioned, the sharpest part appears to be the feet which i guess is because they don't move. At 1/15s, tiny movement of the head will result in being slightly OOF.

Panning is frustrating. I have good days and bad days even though my technique has been the same for years and years. Just the way it is sometimes
 

Stanga

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You did quite well panning from right to left. I am far better at it from left to right. When I used to go hunting I ended up avoiding shooting at anything that was running or flying from right to left for that reason.
 

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